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Course Listings - Office of the Registrar - University of Alberta

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University of Alberta

Course Listings

512

Course Listings 230

Details of Courses  514

231

Course Listings  515

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Abroad, Study Term, ABROD  515 Accounting, ACCTG  515 Administration, ADMI  518 Agreement Formal (Registration), AGRMT  518 Agricultural and Resource Economics, AREC  518 Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, AFNS  520 Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, ALES  523 American Sign Language, ASL  523 Anatomie, ANATE  523 Anatomy, ANAT  524 Andragogie, ANDR  524 Anglais, ANGL  524 Anglais langue seconde, ALS  525 Animal Science, AN SC  525 Anthropologie, ANTHE  527 Anthropology, ANTHR  527 Arabic, ARAB  529 Art, ART  530 Art dramatique, ADRAM  531 Art History, ART H  532 Astronomy, ASTRO  533 Augustana Faculty - Accounting, AUACC  534 Augustana Faculty - Art, AUART  534 Augustana Faculty - Biology, AUBIO  535 Augustana Faculty - Chemistry, AUCHE  537 Augustana Faculty - Classical Studies, AUCLA  538 Augustana Faculty - Community Service Learning, AUCSL  539 Augustana Faculty - Computing Science, AUCSC  539 Augustana Faculty - Crime and Community, AUCRI  541 Augustana Faculty - Drama, AUDRA  541 Augustana Faculty - Economics, AUECO  543 Augustana Faculty - Education Field Experience, AUEFX  545 Augustana Faculty - Educational Computing, AUEDC  545 Augustana Faculty - Educational Psychology, AUEPS  545 Augustana Faculty - English, AUENG  545 Augustana Faculty - Environmental Studies, AUENV  549 Augustana Faculty - French, AUFRE  551 Augustana Faculty - Geography, AUGEO  552 Augustana Faculty - German, AUGER  553 Augustana Faculty - Global and Development Studies, AUGDS  555 Augustana Faculty - Greek, AUGRE  555 Augustana Faculty - History, AUHIS  556 Augustana Faculty - Interdisciplinary Studies, AUIDS  558 Augustana Faculty - Language Studies, AULAN  559 Augustana Faculty - Latin, AULAT  559 Augustana Faculty - Management, AUMGT  559 Augustana Faculty - Mathematics, AUMAT  560 Augustana Faculty - Music, AUMUS  561 Augustana Faculty - Philosophy, AUPHI  567 Augustana Faculty - Physical Activity, AUPAC  568 Augustana Faculty - Physical Education, AUPED  569 Augustana Faculty - Physics, AUPHY  571 Augustana Faculty - Political Studies, AUPOL  572 Augustana Faculty - Psychology, AUPSY  574 Augustana Faculty - Religion, AUREL  576 Augustana Faculty - Scandinavian, AUSCA  578 Augustana Faculty - Sociology, AUSOC  579 Augustana Faculty - Spanish, AUSPA  581 Augustana Faculty - Statistics, AUSTA  582 Augustana Faculty - World Literatures, AULIT  582 Biochemistry, BIOCH  583 Biochimie, BIOCM  585 Bioinformatics, BIOIN  585 Biologie, BIOLE  585

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Biology (Biological Sciences), BIOL  586 Biomedical Engineering, BME  589 Botanique, BOTQ  590 Botany (Biological Sciences), BOT  590 Business, BUS  591 Business Economics, BUEC  592 Business Law, B LAW  594 Canadien-français, CA FR  595 Cell Biology, CELL  595 Chemical and Materials Engineering, CME  596 Chemical Engineering, CH E  597 Chemistry, CHEM  599 Chimie, CHIM  603 Chinese, CHINA  603 Christian Theology at St Joseph’s College, CHRTC  605 Christian Theology at St Stephen’s College, CHRTP  606 Civil Engineering, CIV E  606 Classics, CLASS  611 Communications and Technology, COMM  612 Community Service-Learning, CSL  613 Comparative Literature, C LIT  613 Computer Engineering, CMPE  614 Computing Science, CMPUT  615 Dance, DANCE  618 Dance Activity, DAC  618 Dental Hygiene, D HYG  619 Dentistry, DENT  620 Dentistry, DDS  620 Dentistry/Medicine, DMED  621 Design, DES  621 Drama, DRAMA  623 Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, EAS  626 East Asian Studies, EASIA  631 Economics, ECON  631 Economie, ECONE  634 Education, EDU  634 Education - Adult, EDAE  635 Education - Career Technology Studies, EDCT  636 Education - Elementary, EDEL  636 Education - Elementary and Secondary, EDES  639 Education - Field Experience, EDFX  640 Education - Fondements, EDU F  640 Education - Instructional Technology, EDIT  641 Education - Methodologie et Curriculum, EDU M  641 Education - Policy Studies, EDPS  643 Education - Psychologie, EDU P  645 Education - Psychology, EDPY  646 Education - Secondary, EDSE  649 Education - Stage, EDU S  653 Electrical and Computer Engineering, ECE  653 Electrical Engineering, E E  660 Engineering, Computer, ENCMP  661 Engineering, General, ENGG  661 Engineering Management, ENG M  661 Engineering Physics, EN PH  663 English, ENGL  663 English for Academic Purposes, EAP  667 Entomology (Biological Sciences), ENT  667 Environmental and Conservation Sciences, ENCS  668 Environmental Engineering, ENV E  668 Espagnol, ESPA  669 Etudes canadiennes, ETCAN  669 Etudes de la religion, ET RE  670 Etudes interdisciplinaires, ETIN  670 Exchange Program, EXCH  670 Extension, EXT  670 Family Medicine, F MED  671 Film Studies, FS  671

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Finance, FIN  672 Forest Economics, FOREC  674 Forest Science, FOR  674 Français, FRANC  675 French for Educators / Français pour éducateurs, FR ED  676 French Language and Literature, FREN  676 Genetics (Biological Sciences), GENET  678 Geophysics, GEOPH  679 German, GERM  680 Greek, GREEK  681 Health Education, HE ED  682 Hebrew, HEBR  682 Hindi, HINDI  682 Histoire, HISTE  682 History, HIST  683 Human Ecology, HECOL  687 Human Geography and Planning, HGP  690 Humanités, HUME  691 Humanities Computing, HUCO  691 Hungarian, HUNG  691 Immunologie, IMINE  692 Immunology and Infection, IMIN  692 Industrial Relations, IND R  692 Informatique, INFOR  692 Integrated Petroleum Geosciences, IPG  693 Interdisciplinary Undergraduate and Graduate Courses, INT D  693 Italian, ITAL  697 Japanese, JAPAN  697 Korean, KOREA  699 Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, LABMP  699 Latin, LATIN  700 Latin American Studies, LA ST  701 Law, LAW  701 Library and Information Studies, LIS  706 Linguistics, LING  708 Linguistique, LINGQ  710 Maintaining Registration, M REG  710 Management Information Systems, MIS  710 Management Science, MGTSC  711 Marine Science (Biological Sciences), MA SC  712 Marketing, MARK  713 Master of Internetworking, MINT  715 Materials Engineering, MAT E  715 Mathematical Physics, MA PH  717 Mathematics, MATH  718 Mathématiques, MATHQ  722 Maîtrise ès sciences de l’éducation, M EDU  723 Mechanical Engineering, MEC E  725 Medical Genetics, MDGEN  728 Medical Laboratory Science, MLSCI  728 Medical Microbiology and Immunology, MMI  730 Medicine, MED  731 Microbiologie, MICRE  733 Microbiology (Biological Sciences), MICRB  733 Middle Eastern and African Studies, MEAS  734 Mining Engineering, MIN E  735 Modern Languages and Cultural Studies, MLCS  736 Music, MUSIC  738 Musique, MUSIQ  743 Nanotechnology and Nanoscience, NANO  744 Native Studies, NS  744 Neuroscience (Centre for), NEURO  747 Norwegian, NORW  748 Nursing, NURS  748 Nutrition, NUTR  752 Nutrition and Food Sciences, NU FS  754 Obstetrics and Gynaecology, OB GY  755 Occupational Therapy, OCCTH  755 Oncology, ONCOL  757 Operations Management, OM  759

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Ophthalmology, OPHTH  760 Oral Biology, OBIOL  760 Paediatrics, PAED  760 Paleontology, PALEO  761 Persian, PERS  761 Petroleum Engineering, PET E  761 Pharmacology, PMCOL  763 Pharmacy, PHARM  764 Philosophie, PHILE  768 Philosophy, PHIL  768 Physical Activity, PAC  771 Physical Education and Sport, PEDS  773 Physical Education, Recreation and Leisure Studies, PERLS  775 Physical Therapy, PTHER  777 Physics, PHYS  778 Physiologie, PHYSE  781 Physiology, PHYSL  781 Physique, PHYSQ  782 Plant Science, PL SC  783 Polish, POLSH  783 Political Science, POL S  784 Portuguese, PORT  787 Postgraduate Dental Education, PGDE  787 Postgraduate Medical Education, PGME  788 Psychiatry, PSYCI  788 Psychologie, PSYCE  789 Psychology, PSYCO  789 Punjabi, PUNJ  793 Radiation Therapy, RADTH  793 Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, RADDI  793 Recreation and Leisure Studies, RLS  794 Rehabilitation Medicine, REHAB  795 Religious Studies, RELIG  796 Renewable Resources, REN R  797 Research, RSCH  803 Rural Sociology, R SOC  803 Russian, RUSS  804 Scandinavian, SCAND  805 School of Public Health, SPH  805 Science, SCI  810 Science politique, SC PO  810 Science, Technology, and Society, STS  811 Sciences de la Terre et de l’atmosphère, SCTA  811 Sciences infirmières, SC INF  811 Sciences sociales, SCSOC  812 Sciences socio-politiques, SCSP  812 Slavic and East European Studies, SLAV  812 Sociologie, SOCIE  812 Sociology, SOC  813 Spanish, SPAN  816 Speech Pathology and Audiology, SPA  818 Statistics, STAT  819 Statistique, STATQ  821 Strategic Management and Organization, SMO  821 Surgery, SURG  826 Swahili, SWAH  826 Swedish, SWED  826 Theatre Design, T DES  827 Thesis, THES  828 Ukrainian, UKR  828 University, UNIV  830 Women’s and Gender Studies, WGS  830 Work Experience, WKEXP  831 Writing (Creative Writing), WRITE  832 Writing Studies, WRS  832 Zoology (Biological Sciences), ZOOL  833

513

Course Listings

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University of Alberta

Course Listings

514

University of Alberta

230 Details of Courses Courses taught at the University of Alberta are listed alphabetically. All courses, except those taught by Faculté Saint-Jean, are described in English. Each course is designated by its computer abbreviation and a number. Students should use this abbreviation and number when completing any form requiring this information. Courses are numbered according to the following system: 000-099 Pre-University 100-199 Basic Undergraduate. Normally requires no university-level prerequisites. Designed typically for students in the first year of a program. 200-299 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 100-level. Designed typically for students in the second year of a program. 300-399 Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 200-level. Designed typically for students in the third year of a program. 400-499 Advanced Undergraduate. Prerequisites, if any, are normally at the 300-level. Designed typically for students in the fourth year of a program. 500-599 Graduate. Designated for graduate students and certain advanced or honors undergraduate students in their final year. 600-799 Graduate Courses 800-899 Special Registrations 900-999 Graduate Thesis and Project Numbers For the purposes of program descriptions and prerequisite designation, courses numbered 100-199 are designated as Junior Courses and courses numbered 200-499 are designated as Senior Courses. Note: Some exceptions to the course number system described above have been granted to the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.

Course Description Symbols and Figures Several symbols and figures are used to indicate the type, duration, and weight of courses. (1) Œ—Indicates “units of course weight,” and usually follows the course title. The accompanying number indicates the weight of the course as used in computing grade point averages and for meeting degree requirements. A course which runs throughout the Fall/Winter (i.e., from September through April) is usually weighted Œ6. A course that runs for only one term (i.e., Fall: from September to December, or Winter: from January through April) is usually weighted Œ3. Certain courses are offered over Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer, or in one term, with weights of Œ1, Œ2, and Œ4. These are considered as one-sixth, one-third, and two-thirds of a Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer course, respectively. Some honors and graduate courses involving research may vary in weight according to the length and difficulty of the project. Some clinical courses may vary in weight according to the length of clinical experience. Some courses, not included in the computation of grade point averages, are offered for credit only and either carry a weight of Œ0, or are marked as “Credit.” Undergraduate students who take courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering but are not registered in Engineering will have a course weight assigned for these courses according to the protocol of their home Faculty. (2) fi—Denotes: “fee index,” the value used to calculate the instructional fees for each course. The fee index is multiplied by the fee index value (given in the appropriate subsection of §22.2) to give the dollar value of instructional fees for the course. For normal courses, the fee index is twice the value of the units of course weight; for example, a course with Œ3 normally has fi 6. In cases where exceptional fees considerations need to be made, the fee index is set differently by the Board of Governors. Note that certain programs (e.g., MD, DDS, etc.) are assessed on a program fee basis for all or certain years. In these cases, the fee index calculation does not apply. (3) (x term, a-b-c)—These figures in parentheses give information on when the course is offered and the hours of instruction required by the course in a week, or in some cases the total time in a term. In the case of a single-term course, the term in which the course is given is mentioned (item x). The designation “either term” means that the course may be offered either in the first term or in the second term or in each term, at the discretion of the department concerned. The designation “variable” means that the course may be taught either as a single-term or as a full-session course.

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Item a indicates lecture hours. Item b indicates seminar hour(s), demonstration hours (d), clinic hours (c), or lecture-laboratory hours (L). Item c indicates laboratory hours. For two-term courses, the hours of instruction are the same in both terms unless otherwise indicated. The expression 3/2 means 3 hours of instruction every second week; 2s/2 means 2 seminar hours every second week. Examples: (first term, 3-0-3): a course taught in first term with 3 hours lecture, no seminar, and 3 hours lab per week. (second term, 0-1s-2): a course taught in second term with no lectures, 1 seminar hour, and 2 hours of lab per week. (either term, 3-0-0): a course taught in either first or second term, or each term, with 3 lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab. (two-term, 3-0-3): a course taught over both first and second term with three lecture hours, no seminar, and three hours lab per week. (variable, 3-0-0): a course which may be taught in either first or second term or over two terms with three lecture hours per week, no seminar, and no lab. (4) Prerequisite—This provides information on courses which must be successfully completed before registering in the more advanced course. Corequisite—This provides information on courses which must be taken before or at the same time as the course described in the listing. Note: Departments are authorized to cancel the registration of those students registered in a course offered by the department if they do not meet the prerequisite and/or corequisite requirements stated in the course description in this Calendar. (5) [Department]— This indicates the department responsible for registration for interdepartmental courses. Normally, courses will be credited to the discipline listed in the square brackets. (6) Open Studies Courses— O indicates a course available to students of Open Studies. L indicates that a course is available to Open Studies students on a delayed registration basis only (see §220.2.2).

Important: Registration Procedures for Two-Term Courses Students are strongly advised to refer to the Registration and Courses menu at www.registrarsoffice.ualberta.ca for details. Two-term courses are normally offered over two terms (either Fall/Winter or Spring/Summer). In a few instances, two-term courses are offered within a single term. In all cases these are identifiable in the Class Schedule because they consist of part A and part B (e.g., English 111A and 111B). To successfully register in a two-term course, students, must do the following: • Register in both the part A and part B for all types of sections offered (Lectures, Labs, Seminars, etc.); • Register in the same section numbers for part A and part B of a course (e.g., Lecture A1 for both part A and part B, and Lab E3 for both part A and part B); • Register in all the appropriate sections on the same day. All of the above must be done or the course registration is invalid and will be deleted. Invalid registrations will be deleted nightly. It is the student’s responsibility to attempt the course registration again, subject to availability. Example: A student wishes to register in ABCD 101, a two-term course. It has a lecture and a lab section. Based on the student’s timetable planning, decides to take Lecture C3 and Lab C8. The student must add In Fall Term ABCD 101A Lec C3 and ABCD 101A Lab C8, and In Winter Term ABCD 101B Lec C3 and ABCD 101B Lab C8. All these sections must be added on the same day to successfully register. Otherwise the registration in ABCD 101 will be deleted overnight and the student’s place in the course will be lost.

Course Renumbering Over the years many courses have been renumbered. Old numbers can be found within individual course listings of previous Calendar editions.

Courses on Reserve Courses not offered in the past four years are removed from this Calendar and placed on Reserve. These courses may be taught again in the future, in which case they would be brought back into the active Course Listings and placed in the Calendar. Information about Reserve Courses is available through the Registrar’s Office, the University Secretariat, and Faculty Offices.

Faculty Specific Regulations Regarding Courses For specific Faculty regulations relating to courses and for a complete list of subjects taught by a Faculty, please consult the Undergraduate Programs section of the Calendar at the end of each Faculty section.

University of Alberta

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The University has a commitment to the  education of all academically qualified students and special services are frequently provided on campus to assist disabled students. Nevertheless, some courses make certain unavoidable demands on students with respect to the possession of a certain level of physical skill or ability if the academic objectives of the course are to be realized. In case of doubt, students are advised to contact the Department concerned and Specialized Support and Disability Services (SSDS), Office of the Dean of Students. Because support services cannot be guaranteed for all off-campus courses, instructors may be obliged to refuse registration in such courses.

Course Availability The following is a comprehensive course listing of all the approved courses that the University of Alberta may offer. The appearance of a course in this list does not guarantee that the course will actually be offered. The most current information on courses is available on Bear Tracks at http://www.beartracks. ualberta.ca

231 Course Listings 231.1

Abroad, Study Term, ABROD Education Abroad Program

Undergraduate Courses ABROD 800 Study Term Abroad Œ0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned). This course is reserved for students who wish to maintain registration while participating in formal University of Alberta managed and approved Study Abroad programs. Students are registered in this course for each approved term of study abroad. The only fees assessed for this registration are the normal registration and transcript fees associated with the term. Students are eligible to register in the course on more than one occasion. Closed to web registration. Contact the Education Abroad Program, University of Alberta International.

231.2

Accounting, ACCTG Department of Accounting, Operations and Information Systems Faculty of Business

Notes (1) Enrolment in all ACCTG courses, except ACCTG 300, is restricted to students registered in the Faculty of Business, or to students registered in specified programs that require Business courses to meet degree requirements and who have obtained prior approval of their Faculty. (2) See also Management Information Systems listing.

Undergraduate Courses ACCTG 300 Introduction to Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Provides a basic understanding of accounting: how accounting numbers are generated, the meaning of accounting reports, and how to use accounting reports to make decisions. Note: Not open to students registered in the Faculty of Business. Not for credit in the Bachelor of Commerce Program. ACCTG 311 Introduction to Accounting for Financial Performance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1.5s-0). How to prepare and interpret financial statements that report to decision makers external to the enterprise, such as shareholders and creditors. Course includes principles and standards of balance sheet valuation, income measurement, financial disclosure and cash flow analysis that link preparation and use of such statements. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. ACCTG 322 Introduction to Accounting for Management Decision Making Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In contrast to the external orientation of ACCTG 311, this course focuses on how to prepare and use accounting information for management decision making. Major topics include: the role of corporate goals, planning and control concepts, how costs behave and how to analyze and manage them, budgeting and performance measures. Prerequisite: ACCTG 311. ACCTG 412 Financial Reporting for Managers and Analysts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Course is for students who are not accounting majors and is especially useful for those contemplating a career in financial management or a CFA designation. It is for students who want to build on the

The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. 

financial accounting knowledge developed in ACCTG 311, and provides the necessary foundation for courses in financial statement analysis and tax. Further depth is provided in balance sheet valuation, income measurement, earnings per share and cash flow analysis. Prerequisite: ACCTG 311. Corequisite: FIN 301. Not open to students with credit in ACCTG 414 or 415. ACCTG 414 Intermediate Financial Accounting I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). First of two courses covering principles, methods and applications of current and proposed Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Emphasizes accounting for operating and investment assets, and related income measurement and disclosure. Prerequisites: ACCTG 311 and 322. Not open to students with credit in ACCTG 412. There is a consolidated exam for ACCTG 414. ACCTG 415 Intermediate Financial Accounting II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Second of two courses (see ACCTG 414) covering principles, methods and applications of current and proposed Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Emphasizes accounting for financing, liabilities and equity, related income measurement and disclosure, and cash flow. Prerequisites: FIN 301, and a minimum grade of C- in ACCTG 414 or 412. ACCTG 416 Accounting Theory and Current Issues Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major concepts and current issues in accounting thought are examined in an interactive setting. Topics include: the conceptual framework, standard-setting, concepts of income and value, accounting’s role in capital markets and in contracts such as for lending and compensation, and recent and emerging issues related to financial and managerial accounting information. Prerequisites: ACCTG 414 or 412; FIN 301. Open only to fourth-year Business students, or by consent of the Department Chair. There is a consolidated exam for ACCTG 416. ACCTG 418 Advanced Financial Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course analyzes the concepts and practices underlying financial reporting in more complex areas such as business combinations, multinational operations, future income taxes and not for profit organizations. Prerequisite: ACCTG 415. Open only to fourth-year Business students or by consent of the Department Chair. ACCTG 424 Intermediate Management Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Emphasizes mastery of techniques for implementation and evaluation of cost systems for management and decision making. Cost issues include: accumulating and analyzing costs using actual, standard and activity-based approaches, overhead allocation and cost estimation. Management topics include: pricing, production and investment decisions, revenue analysis, performance evaluation, management incentive systems and strategy analysis. Linear programming and multiple regression may be used. Prerequisites: ACCTG 322 and MGTSC 312. There is a consolidated exam for ACCTG 424. ACCTG 426 Management Control Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Current research and cases in managerial accounting and control with a particular focus on strategy, governance and control processes in modern organizations. Topics include: control system design (including governance and audit), responsibility accounting, performance management, and strategic management accounting. Prerequisite: ACCTG 424. Open only to fourth year Business students, or by consent of Department Chair. ACCTG 432 Financial Statement Analysis I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). May be taken on its own or as the first of a twocourse sequence that develops student competence in using financial information. Using case analysis, students learn to value a firm through the use of a five-step process: (1) examination of firm’s industry, markets and strategy, (2) evaluation of firm’s accounting policies and their impact on the financial reports, (3) applying fundamental analysis to assess financial strengths and weaknesses, (4) forecasting future earnings and cash flows, and (5) applying valuation models. Corequisites: ACCTG 415 or 412. ACCTG 433 Financial Statement Analysis II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Second in a two-course sequence that develops student competence in the application of the tools of financial analysis. Topics include: evaluation of common rule-of-thumb valuation tools such as price to earnings and price to sales ratios in the light of more complete valuation models; analysis for credit and lending decisions; valuing high tech firms; forecasting quarterly and annual earnings; links between stock prices and earnings; using segment information; and other current issues. Prerequisite: ACCTG 432. ACCTG 435 Information, Ethics and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). For students in all majors who are interested in information and the roles it plays in business and society. Focus is on the nature and basic characteristics of information, and its importance in contemporary society, viewing information as a commodity that is produced, used, bought and sold. Two aspects of the ways in which information affects people are emphasized: (1) ethical issues relating to professions, businesses, government, and individuals; (2) the impact of information technology and technological change on society. Prerequisites: Open only to third or fourth year Business students, or by consent of the Department Chair. Credit may be granted for only one of ACCTG 435, BUS 435 or MIS 435.

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A Course Listings

Physical Requirements for University Courses

515

Course Listings A

516

University of Alberta

ACCTG 437 Accounting Information Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the field of computerized accounting information systems in organizations: basic transaction processing, record updating and maintenance, and financial and managerial reporting functions. Concentrates on the scope of accounting information systems in organizations; impacts of computerized accounting information systems on the role of the professional accountants; design issues for accounting information systems: security, accuracy, integrity, recovery, and operational control issues relating to accounting information systems; and impacts of computerized accounting information systems on the auditing processes in organizations. Prerequisites: ACCTG 311, 322, MIS 311. Credit may be granted for only one of ACCTG 437 or MIS 437. ACCTG 442 International Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). How international business transactions are reflected in a company’s financial statements, and how to manage international operations ‘by the numbers.’ Managers will develop the tools necessary to understand foreign partners’/competitors’ financial statements. Prerequisites: ACCTG 311, 322. ACCTG 456 Assurance on Financial Information Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Focuses on the external auditor’s provision of assurance services on financial information. Topics include: society’s demand for various assurance services; the role, profession, ethics, independence and liability of the assurance provider; assurance risk and strategy; assurance planning, operations and reports; computerization and internal control; and emerging assurance services. Prerequisite: ACCTG 414 or 412. ACCTG 463 Accounting for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers accounting rules and practice in the area of natural resources, energy and the environment. Some topics include mineral rights and exploration costs, emissions trading, environmental reporting and liabilities. While it does contain technical material, it is meant for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both International and U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) will be explored. The focus will be on understanding how firms in this area report their natural resource assets and related liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCTG 311. ACCTG 412 or 414 are recommended. ACCTG 467 Basic Income Tax Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines the concepts, regulations and interpretations underlying individual and corporate income tax from the tax professional’s perspective. Topics include: structure of the Income Tax Act, residency requirements, employment income, business and property income, capital gains, and the calculation of tax payable for individuals. Tax planning is introduced and opportunities for tax planning are identified where appropriate as topics are covered. Prerequisite: ACCTG 414 or 412. ACCTG 468 Corporate Taxation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of the major tax concepts behind the specific provisions of the Income Tax Act in the taxation of corporations, corporate distributions and transactions between corporations and their shareholders. Emphasis on applying the Act in practical problems and case settings. Prerequisite: ACCTG 467. ACCTG 480 Accounting Honors Seminar Part I Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). This is primarily a case-based course that covers the preparation of integrated pro forma financial statements and their use in making financial decisions, as well as selected other topics in financial accounting. Topics will vary from year to year with case selection, and may include (but are not necessarily limited to) the areas of revenue recognition, cash flow analysis, intangible assets, asset impairment, inter-corporate investments, hybrid debt securities, leases, pensions, and equity-based compensation. While the course contains sufficient technical material to ensure familiarity with the financial reporting issues discussed, the main emphasis of the course will be on the interpretation and use of financial information for purposes of decision making. Prerequisites: ACCTG 415, FIN 301 ACCTG 481 Accounting Honors Seminar Part II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers 3 topic areas: (1) History of accounting thought including coverage of current standard setting activities, (2) Professionalism in accounting including exposure to current practical issues requiring professional judgment, and (3) Exposure to current accounting research and design of research studies. Prerequisite: ACCTG 415. ACCTG 495 Individual Research Project I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special Study for advanced undergraduates. May be considered as a Group A or Group B elective at the discretion of the Department. Prerequisites: consent of Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program. ACCTG 496 Individual Research Project II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special Study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: ACCTG 495, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program. ACCTG 497 Individual Research Project III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special Study for advanced undergraduates.

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Prerequisites: ACCTG 496, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program.

Graduate Courses ACCTG 501 Introduction to Financial Reporting and Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Accounting information’s role in recording and reporting on economic and business events including the primary financial statements: balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow. Concepts and purposes underlying financial reporting. Selection of accounting policies and their informational effects for external users. The course begins to develop students’ abilities to evaluate and interpret financial information through basic financial analysis. ACCTG 523 Accounting Information and Internal Decision Making Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Accounting concepts used by managers in planning and decision-making. The course introduces concepts of cost and profit behavior, contribution margin, and activity-based costing, as well as relevant costs and revenues for production, marketing and capital budgeting decisions. The course also introduces students to the management planning and control system and its components - budgets, variance analysis, performance evaluation in centralized and decentralized organizations, and management compensation plans. The importance of designing a system to fit the organizations’ strategy is emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. ACCTG 586 Selected Topics in Accounting Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics in this seminar may vary from year to year and are chosen at the discretion of the Instructor. ACCTG 610 Financial Reporting for Managers and Analysts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intended for students who would like to build on the financial accounting knowledge developed in ACCTG 501, and is especially useful for those contemplating a career in financial management. Useful both as a stand-alone course and as a foundation for further study in financial statement analysis. Provides further depth in balance sheet valuation and income measurement in order to enhance students’ ability to use financial accounting as a management tool. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. Corequisite: FIN 501 or 503. Students may receive credit for only two of the following three courses: ACCTG 610, 614 and 615. ACCTG 613 Financial Information and Capital Markets Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Uses of financial information by consumers and the incentives that producers face. Prerequisites: ACCTG 501, FIN 501 or 503, and MGTSC 501. ACCTG 614 Intermediate Financial Accounting I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). First of two courses covering the theory, methods, strengths, and weaknesses of current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. Students may receive credit for only two of ACCTG 610, 614, and 615. ACCTG 615 Intermediate Financial Accounting II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Second of two courses covering theory, methods, strengths, and weaknesses of current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Prerequisite: ACCTG 614. Students may receive credit for only two of the following three courses: ACCTG 610, 614, and 615 . ACCTG 616 Seminar in Financial Accounting Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The theory and propositions underlying current financial accounting practices and alternative theories of accounting measurement as proposed in the literature. The function of accounting in relation to the decision processes of the principal external users of accounting data is considered. Prerequisites: ACCTG 614 or 610, FIN 501 or 503. ACCTG 618 Seminar in Advanced Accounting Issues Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The application of accounting methods to incorporate investments and other advanced topics in financial reporting. Prerequisites: ACCTG 615. ACCTG 624 Seminar in Management Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Seminar consisting of topics concerned at an advanced level with generating and using accounting and related data in the planning and control functions of organizations. Prerequisite: ACCTG 523. ACCTG 626 Seminar in Managerial Control Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Current research and cases in managerial accounting. Prerequisites: ACCTG 523. ACCTG 630 Financial Statement Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Develops students’ competence in analyzing financial statements and using financial information to make investment decisions, both equity and debt. The primary thrust of the course is aimed at equity investments. Students learn a five step process of analysis for equity investments: (1) An examination of the firm’s industry, markets and strategy, (2) An evaluation of the firm’s accounting policies and their impact on the financial reports, (3) Applying fundamental analysis to assess financial strengths and weaknesses, (4) Forecasting future earnings and cash flows, and (5) Applying valuation models to assess the current price. A comparable process for lending decisions is then developed. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. Corequisite: FIN 501 or 503.

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ACCTG 662 Strategic Tax Planning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course provides a general economic background to embed the consideration of tax provisions in organizational decision-making. The concepts learnt should be applicable and transferable to different tax regimes. Applications include showing how better decisions can be made by applying tax planning concepts and knowledge of specific tax regimes to investment decisions, compensation planning, choice of organizational form, and mergers and acquisitions. International tax planning is also covered. ACCTG 663 Accounting for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers accounting rules and practice in the area of natural resources, energy and the environment. Some topics include mineral rights and exploration costs, emissions trading, environmental reporting and liabilities. While it does contain technical material, it is meant for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both International and U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) will be explored. The focus will be on understanding how firms in this area report their natural resource assets and related liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCTG 501. ACCTG 667 Basic Income Tax Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines the concepts, regulations and interpretations underlying individual and corporate income tax from the tax professional’s perspective. Topics include: structure of the Income Tax Act, residency requirements, employment income, business and property income, capital gains, and the calculation of tax payable for individuals. Tax planning is introduced and opportunities for tax planning are identified where appropriate as topics are covered. Prerequisite: ACCTG 614 or 610. ACCTG 686 Selected Topics in Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics may vary from year to year and are chosen at the discretion of the instructor. ACCTG 701 The Methodological Foundations of Accounting Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Because the practice of accounting and the use of accounting information are complex and multifaceted, a wide variety of research approaches provide an understanding of accounting. These approaches are primarily in the social sciences, but also in mathematics and some of the humanities, such as history and philosophy. The purpose of this course is to examine some of the fundamental ideas and concepts underlying the research process in accounting. It focuses on the philosophy of the social sciences, since they provide the core of theory and methods for accounting research. Topics include the objectives of social science research; the nature and role of theories; the relationship between facts and values; theory construction, testing, falsification and inference; positivist vs. non-positivist methods; social studies of science and scientists; and research ethics (including research involving human subjects). The emphasis is on the scientific method broadly construed and applied, rather than on specific techniques. Open to all doctoral students or with written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students. ACCTG 703 Accounting Research Workshop Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 3-0-0). Based on the Department’s research workshop program, this course will discuss research methodology as it applies to accounting and ensure students learn how to review/evaluate current research and literature. Students are expected to present their own research and to analyze the research of others. This workshop is a single term course offered over two terms. Students are expected to attend regularly throughout their doctoral program, but register for credit in their second year (prior to taking accounting comprehensive examination). ACCTG 705 Individual Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). ACCTG 706 Behavioral Research in Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A generalist course on research that is primarily oriented to individual behavior in accounting settings. Topics covered will include individual cognitive processes and limitations, the experimental method, and a broad survey of experimental studies (drawing on psychology and economics) conducted in accounting settings. Open to all doctoral students or with the written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students. ACCTG 707 Introduction to Accounting in its Organizational and Social Context Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A generalist course that examines historical, sociological and organizational perspectives on accounting. Topics covered will vary, but will include the development of accounting thought, historical and

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field methods in accounting research, theories of accounting change, political economy of accounting, and analysis of the accounting profession and regulatory institutions. Open to all doctoral students or with the written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students. ACCTG 708 Introduction to Financial Economics Based Research in Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introductory course on research that examines the role of accounting information in market economies and organizations. Topics covered will vary, but will include the theory and developments underlying financial economic research and a broad survey of empirical and analytical studies conducted in accounting settings. Open to all doctoral students or with the written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students. ACCTG 721 Advanced Topics in Interdisciplinary Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A specialist course on the conduct of interdisciplinary accounting research. Content will vary depending on the interests of students and faculty, but the emphasis will be on organizational, institutional, social, political or philosophical perspectives on accounting and auditing. Open to all doctoral students or with written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students. ACCTG 732 Analytical Research in Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Develops an information economics framework for understanding the role of accounting information in financial markets and in organizations. Involves significant microeconomics, game theory, and mathematics. Pre- or corequisite: ACCTG 731 or equivalent. Open to all doctoral students or with written permission of the instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students. ACCTG 810 International Financial Reporting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course uses cases and current contentious topics to cover important financial reporting issues and how these issues relate to the firm’s strategy. The course emphasizes International Accounting Standards with appropriate references to American standards, underlining differences in specific standards or underlying philosophy. Content is covered from the perspective of the firm and its ability to fully inform its external investors and how financial reporting is both an integral part of the firm’s governance system and a significant input to its ability to raise capital. ACCTG 820 Financial Accounting Œ3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0). Reporting of financial results of operations and financial positions to investors and managers; the use of accounting information for decision making. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. ACCTG 826 Management Accounting for Decision and Control Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course focuses on information for decisionmaking and control. Topics include designing and implementing cost systems that will enhance operating decisions relating to pricing, production, marketing alternatives and investment decisions. The creation of performance measurement systems that are consistent with organizational structures and compensation systems are covered. Cases are used to provide context and to develop students’ knowledge in a practical setting. ACCTG 830 Organization Planning and Control Œ3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0). Implementing financial performance measurement, evaluation and control systems, and organizational designs that enhance performance; understanding organizational structures and processes. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. ACCTG 832 Valuation and Financial Statement Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Develops students’ competence in analyzing financial statements and using financial information to make investment decisions, both equity and debt. The CFO needs to understand how analysts are likely to perceive and translate financial reports into valuation estimates, and ultimately investment decisions. Students learn current valuation models that translate the financial information based on reasonable assumptions into projections of a firm’s value investors. All valuations are informed by: (1) the firm’s industry, markets and strategy, (2) the appropriateness of the firm’s accounting policies, (3) an assessment of financial strengths and weaknesses, (4) forecasts of future earnings and cash flows, and (5) using valuation models to translate the information to a price. ACCTG 856 Internal Control and Audit Function Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course takes the student through internal control including the basic tenets, types and sources of audit assurance, value for money audits, how internal control serves as a basis for external audits, and how internal control is necessary to organizational governance. The course also explains the external demand for audited financial information and its relationship to corporate reporting and the ability to access different types of external financing. The course also reviews the implications of recent developments by which global securities regulators mandate the attestation of a strong internal control function. ACCTG 864 Strategic Tax Planning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course provides a general economic background

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ACCTG 656 Auditing History, Theory, and Current Thought Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Focuses on the external auditor’s provision of assurance services on financial information. Topics include: society’s demand for various assurance services; the role, profession, ethics, independence and liability of the assurance provider; assurance risk and strategy; assurance planning, operations and reports; computerization and internal control; and emerging assurance services. Prerequisite: ACCTG 614 or 610.

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Course Listings A

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to embed the consideration of tax provisions in organizational decision making. The concepts learnt should be applicable and transferable to different tax regimes. Applications include showing how better decisions can be made by applying tax planning concepts and knowledge of specific tax regimes to investment decisions, compensation planning, choice of organizational form, and mergers and acquisitions. International tax planning is also covered.

231.3

Administration, ADMI Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle O ADMI 301 Fondements légaux de l’économie canadienne Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Étude synoptique du système légal canadien, mettant l’accent sur les considérations sous-jacentes de politique sociale. Tout en considérant la nature, les sources, et la philosophie du droit, ainsi que les objectifs des politiques qu’il codifie, des sujets choisis dans les champs de la responsabilité civile délictuelle et contractuelle seront analysés. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour B LAW 301. ADMI 302 Introduction à la finance Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-1s-0). Différents types de titres boursiers et méthodes d’évaluation de base. Évaluation et sélection d’actifs matériels et intellectuels. Fonctionnement et efficience des marchés financiers. Mesures de risque et méthode de réduction du risque. Politique de financement, incluant le choix entre l’endettement et les fonds propres. Note: On s’attend à ce que les étudiants soient familiers avec les logiciels informatiques de base. Préalable(s): STAT 151 ou équivalent. Autres cours préalable(s) ou concomitant(s): MGTSC 312, ACCTG 300 ou ACCTG 311. O ADMI 311 Introduction à la comptabilité Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-1.5s-0). Postulats, principes, cycle comptable, calcul du capital et du revenu, préparation et analyse d’un état financier, instance sur les rapports à présenter aux actionnaires et autres agents externes détenant des pouvoirs de décision. Préalable(s): ECONE 101/102. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ACCTG 311. O ADMI 322 Gestion et méthodes de contrôle Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Objectifs d’une entreprise, concepts de planification et de contrôle, accumulation des coûts en vue de l’établissement des prix et de l’évaluation du prix de revient des produits. Préalable(s): ADMI 311 ou ACCTG 311. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ACCTG 322. ADMI 342 Introduction au Commerce International Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Introduction aux outils requis pour réussir dans un monde des affaires de plus en plus international. Sert de tremplin à des cours plus avancés en affaires internationales. Les sujets couverts incluent les différences entre les pays, le commerce international, l´investissement direct étranger, l´intégration économique internationale, le marché des changes, et la stratégie et les opérations en affaires internationales. Note : Ce cours n´est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour BUEC 342. O ADMI 441 Stratégie d’entreprise Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 1.5-1.5s-0). Examine les décisions prises par les directions d’entreprises et met l’accent sur le développement de stratégies d’affaires et corporatives. Intègre les principes de gestion étudiés dans le tronc commun en administration des affaires, en utilisant des études de cas. Pourra inclure des invités de l’Université et du monde des affaires. Préalable(s): FIN 301, MARK 301, SMO 201 or 310. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour SMO 441. O ADMI 444 Commerce international Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Problèmes et opportunités lorsqu’une entreprise opère dans plus d’un pays: le choix à faire entre opérer à l’étranger, l’exportation et l’utilisation de licences; nature et causes de l’émergence des nouveaux marchés de capitaux; institutions internationales facilitant le financement de l’exportation; programmes de stabilisation des prix des produits de base; implications des politiques commerciales, fiscales et d’intégration pour les décisions d’entreprises; aspects de la gestion internationale, incluant la couverture contre le risque de fluctuation des taux de change, coûts de transfert et choix de structure de capital optimale. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour BUEC 444. O ADMI 445 Stratégies concurrentielles en commerce international Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Le processus de conception et d’exécution de stratégies compétitives par des firmes opérant dans plusieurs pays ou globalement. Accent sur les cadres de stratégies concurrentielles, les formes changeantes de la compétition internationale, les niveaux d’analyse de la compétition internationale, la formulation et l’exécution de stratégies compétitives internationales. La matière est illustrée par des études de cas spéciaux de firmes

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canadiennes. Préalable(s): BUEC 311. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour BUEC 445. O ADMI 463 L’énergie et l’environnement: Structure industrielle, performance et défis Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Dans ce cours on utilise les outils de l’économique pour obtenir une meilleure compréhension des marchés et de l’industrie de l’énergie. Les différences et similarités entre les industries (pétrole, gaz naturel, électricité, etc.) et entre les différents segments (exploration, production, vente) sont expliquées. On y analyse les grands défis de l’industrie, entre autres la question environnementale et la mondialisation des marchés et les nouvelles formes de la concurrence. On verra comment cette transformation de l’industrie affectera les performances et stratégies de l’industrie. Préalable(s): ECONE 281 ou ECON 281 ou BUEC 311. O ADMI 479 L’entreprise et le gouvernement au Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Analyse de l’interaction entre l’entreprise et l’administration publique. On s’intéresse en particulier à la dynamique d’ajustement de la firme et du gouvernement dans les changements d’environnement et de politiques. Les motivations et comportements des décideurs publics et des personnes responsables de l’application des mesures sont présentés dans le contexte d’interaction entre les différents groupes impliqués. Sont posées les bases d’une analyse de l’efficacité des différentes politiques, tant fiscales que réglementaires, visant la firme. On y aborde aussi les conséquences des changements de l’environnement économique, technologique et social pour la firme. Préalable(s): ECONE 281 ou BUEC 311. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour BUEC 479.

231.4

Agreement Formal (Registration), AGRMT Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

Graduate Courses AGRMT 900 Formal Agreement Registration Œ0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned). This course is reserved for University of Alberta graduate students participating in an approved program administered under a formal agreement between the University of Alberta and other institution(s), who wish to maintain part-time registration at the University of Alberta while studying at an approved partner institution. Closed to web registration. Registration is recommended to the FGSR by the student’s home unit. AGRMT 909 Formal Agreement Registration Œ0 (fi 0) (either term, unassigned). This course is reserved for University of Alberta graduate students participating in an approved program administered under a formal agreement between the University of Alberta and other institution(s), who wish to maintain full-time registration at the University of Alberta while studying at an approved partner institution. Closed to web registration. Registration is recommended to the FGSR by the student’s home unit.

231.5

Agricultural and Resource Economics, AREC Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

Notes (1) Before 2003-2004, Agricultural and Resource Economics courses (AREC) were listed as Agricultural Economics (AG EC). (2) See also Environmental and Conservation Sciences (ENCS), Forest Economics (FOREC), Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Courses (INT D) and Rural Sociology (R SOC) listings for related courses.

Undergraduate Courses O AREC 173 The Plate, the Planet and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A cornerstone course that provides an introduction to social perspectives on everything from what we eat for breakfast to how we protect endangered species and agricultural landscapes. Topics covered include current issues around food production and consumption and issues related to sustainability of our natural and social systems. Debates over new technologies (e.g., GMOs, nanotechnology), food, environment, and health can only be understood in the context of political, economic and personal decisions. O AREC 200 Current Economic Issues for Agriculture and Food Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Applications of economic principles to problems and current issues relating to agriculture, food and the environment. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or consent of Department. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 200 and AG EC 200.

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O AREC 313 Statistical Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-2). Analysis of economic data relating to renewable resource sectors including agriculture, food, forestry, and the environment; collection of data, sampling methods, tests of hypotheses, index numbers, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation; time series analysis. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics course. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 313 and AG EC 416. O AREC 323 Introduction to Management for Agri-Food, Environmental, and Forestry Businesses Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Principles and practical aspects of business management, and their relevance to the managing businesses involved in a variety of industries, including agriculture, environment, food, and forestry. Topics include business planning and organizing, and issues related to the management of financial, physical, and human resources. Prerequisite: ECON 101. Corequisite: ECON 102. Not open to students in BSc Agriculture Business Management, Food Business Management, or Forest Business Management. O AREC 333 Economics of Production and Resource Management Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-2). Application of economic concepts and introduction of management tools related to production decision-making for resource-based businesses. Integration of biophysical and environmental relationships with economic objectives in allocating resources. Introduction to quantitative tools used in applied production management decision-making. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AG EC 200, ECON 281, INT  D 365, AREC 365 or equivalent. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 333 and AG EC 333. O AREC 365 Natural Resource Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economics of natural resources; resource scarcity, conservation, sustainability, water resource issues, fisheries, forestry, agriculture, recycling, property and tenure institutions, and public resource policy. Credit will be given for only AREC 365 and ECON 365. Prerequisite: ECON 101. O AREC 375 World Food and Agriculture Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Economic issues in international agriculture including the world food problem, agricultural development; agricultural and food trade and policy and selected agricultural biotechnology issues. Selected international applications and issues are stressed. Prerequisite: One of the following: ECON 101 or consent of Department. Credit will only be given for one of INT  D 303, AREC 375, AREC 475 and AG EC 475. O AREC 384 Food Market Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1). Applications of price and market theories to marketing problems and issues for food and agricultural products. Topics include: market structures and marketing functions; price analysis; futures markets; economics of food safety and quality; and international food marketing. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AG EC 200, ECON 281, INT D 365, AREC 365 or equivalent. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 384 and AG EC 384. O AREC 400 Special Topics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Individual study of a selected topic or problem supervised by a Faculty member, requiring preparation of written reports. Prerequisite: consent of the Department Chair. AREC 410 Advanced Methods and Applications in Applied Economics Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 6-0-0). Empirical applications of methods used in resource, environmental, agri-food, and forest economics. Involves one or more case study projects that focus on the empirical examination of economic issues in renewable resource management. Credit will be given for only one of AREC 410 and ENCS 410. Prerequisites: AREC 313 by consent of Instructor. Open to fourth year students in Agricultural/Food Business Management, Agriculture (Agricultural and Resource Economics major), Environmental and Conservation Sciences (Environmental Economics and Policy major) and Forest Business Management programs, or consent of Instructor. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AREC 423 Advanced Management Methods and Applications for AgriFood, Environmental and Forestry Businesses Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Empirical applications of management and research methods used by business managers. Emphasis is given to integrating economic and business management concepts with applications to problems and issues in agriculture, food, the environment and forestry. Prerequisites: AREC 313 or consent of Instructor. Open to fourth year students in Agricultural/Food Business Management, Agriculture (Agricultural and Resource Economics major), Environmental and Conservation Sciences (Environmental Economics and Policy

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major) and Forest Business Management, Nutrition and Food Science (Food marketing minor and Food Policy minor) programs, or consent of Instructor. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AREC 430 Economic Impact Assessment Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Examination of the theory and application of economic assessment methods with a focus on the evaluation of environmental, agricultural and natural resource projects, regulatory policy, and planning. Includes case studies of recent project and policy proposals to illustrate the methods used to evaluate economic benefits and costs of such proposals. Applications to estimating private economic benefits. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 281, or equivalent, or consent of Instructor. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 430, 450, 530 and 550. O AREC 433 Financial Management in Resource Industries Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Recent theoretical and empirical developments in finance are applied to natural resource industries including agribusiness, farming, forestry and food. Emphasis on capital budgeting, financial risk, and associated topics for long run investment planning in smaller business enterprises. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AG EC 200, ECON 281, INT  D 365, AREC 365, FIN 301 or equivalent. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 433 and AG EC 433. AREC 465 Advanced Natural Resource Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Applied economic modeling of renewable resource utilization and environmental issues with a focus in forestry and agriculture. Topics may include current Canadian and international issues in the area of environmental valuation, energy, climate change, biodiversity and conservation as related to Forestry and Agriculture. Prerequisite: AREC 365 or permission of Instructor; (AG EC 416 or AREC 313) and ECON 281 recommended. Credit will be given for only one of AREC 465 and INT  D 465. O AREC 471 Society and Well-Being Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Economic, political, historical, and legal perspectives on how and why governments promote well-being in areas such as food safety, nutritional policy, consumer protection, recreation, and the workplace. Topics include the historical development of wellness-related policies, how these decisions are made in society, and economic and moral justifications for such interventions. Prerequisites: One of the following: AREC 200, ECON 281, AREC 365, ECON 365, or consent of the instructor. O AREC 473 Food and Agricultural Policies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economics of public policy for agriculture and food industries. Public choice principles and institutions. Farm and food policy in Canada and selected countries. Case studies on price and output policy; agricultural trade; food safety and quality; resource use and environmental sustainability; and/or rural change/restructuring. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, ECON 281, AREC 365, ECON 365, or equivalent. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 473 and AG EC 473. O AREC 482 Cooperatives and Alternative Business Institutions Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). The impact of agri-food and resource market structures on market conduct and performance; the impact of market structure on selection of cooperative versus investor owned firms including differences in firm objectives, performance and management incentives; topics may also include effects of firm type on community development and policy formation. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AG EC 200, ECON 281, INT D 365, AREC 365 or equivalent. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 482 and AG EC 482. O AREC 484 Strategic Management in Food and Resource Businesses Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of strategic management concepts and applications to agri-food and resource industries. The development of business and corporate strategies including competitive positioning; sustaining competitive advantage; vertical coordination and strategic alliances in value chains; corporate diversification and global business strategy. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AREC 323, AG EC 200, AG EC 323, ECON 281, INT  D 365, AREC 365 or equivalent. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 484 and AG EC 484. O AREC 485 Trade and Globalization in Food and Resources Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Principles and policies affecting international trade in food, forestry and natural resources. Current issues in trade, including fair trade concerns, trade in capital and services, effects of food safety and quality standards, and environmental issues surrounding trade agreements and institutions. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 365, R SOC 355 or equivalent. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 485 and AG EC 485. O AREC 487 Managing Market Risk in Resource Industries Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the mechanics and economic functions of commodity futures and options derivative markets. Topics include the theory and practice of hedging, price formation and issues unique to commodities. Emphasis on concepts and analysis to evaluate derivative markets; use of derivatives to manage market risk in agribusiness, forestry and other resource businesses. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 281, FIN 301, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

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A Course Listings

O AREC 214 Applications of Linear Models to Food, Resources and the Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-2). An introduction to methods and tools that are used to solve linear quantitative problems. Emphasis is on the use of these techniques for economic analysis in applications related to agriculture, food, forestry, and the environment. Classroom examples, laboratory assignments and computer tutorials are provided to give practice in applying quantitative tools to empirical problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. Credit will be granted for only one of AREC 214 and AG EC 316.

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520

University of Alberta

AREC 488 Introduction to Agricultural and Resource Game Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Game theory analyzes situations in which payoffs to agents depend on the behavior of other agents. Basics of game theoretic analysis are introduced. Applications to the agri-food and resource industries are discussed. Prerequisites AREC 200, AREC 365, or ECON 281.

Graduate Courses Notes (1) See also INT  D 565 for a course offered by more than one Department or Faculty and which may be taken as an option or as a course. (2) Undergraduate AREC courses at the 400 level may be taken for credit by graduate students in Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology. AREC 500 Special Topics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Individual study or special topics course in agricultural and resource economics under the supervision of a Faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of Department Chair. O AREC 502 Advanced Price Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Principles of consumer demand and producer supply analysis including theoretical and empirical approaches to the analysis of consumer and producer choice. Applications include food demand analysis (single equations and systems approaches), price expectations and producer supply decisions, market model simulation and policy evaluation, and economic welfare measurement. Corequisite: ECON 481. O AREC 513 Econometric Applications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Econometric theory, multiple linear regression analysis and interpretation, simultaneous equation estimation, qualitative choice models, time series analysis, applications of econometric techniques to resource and agricultural economic problems. Prerequisite: Intermediate course in statistics or econometrics. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 513 and AG EC 513. O AREC 514 Quantitative Techniques Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Selected applications of econometrics, operations research, and mathematical programming to economic problems in resource, agriculture, forestry, and food sectors. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 514 and AG EC 514. AREC 530 Economic Impact Assessment Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Examination of the theory and application of economic assessment methods with a focus on the evaluation of environmental, agricultural and natural resource projects, regulatory policy, and planning. Includes case studies of recent project and policy proposals to illustrate the methods used to evaluate economic benefits and costs of such proposals. Applications to estimating private economic benefits. Prerequisite: One of the following: AREC 200, AREC 365, ECON 281, or equivalent, or consent of Instructor. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 430, 450, 530 and 550. O AREC 533 Production Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Static and dynamic firm theory, production principles applied to resource use, resource and product combination, cost structure, uncertainty and expectations. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor; (AREC 313 or AG EC 416) and ECON 481 recommended. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 533 and AG EC 533. O AREC 534 Agricultural Finance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced capital budgeting and financing issues relating to agriculture and small businesses. Risk measurement and management. Cost of capital and valuation of assets. Development of stochastic simulation and real options models. Prerequisites: consent of Instructor; (AREC 313 or AG EC 416) and (AREC 433, AG EC 433 or FIN 301) recommended. AREC 543 Advanced Topics in Production Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theoretical models and empirical methods for issues and problems in production economics. Topics will vary with developments in this field but may include efficiency analysis, risk and uncertainty, simulation and mathematical programming models. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor. AREC 533 and ECON 481 recommended. AREC 565 Economic Valuation of Ecosystem Services Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economic valuation of ecosystem goods and services. Topics include: Theoretical and empirical analysis of environmental valuation methods, advanced benefit cost analysis, welfare economics, valuation of ecosystem goods and services, valuation of health impacts from environmental quality change, and linkages to experimental and behavioural economics. Prerequisite: Œ3 Introductory Econometrics course and consent of instructor; AREC 502 recommended. [Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology] O AREC 569 Advanced Topics in Natural Resource and Environmental Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theoretical analysis and modeling of renewable resource and environmental issues at local and global levels. Includes analysis of international environmental issues, the effect of economic growth on the environment, sustainable development, and local and global commons management.

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Prerequisite: ECON 481 or consent of Department. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 569 and AG EC 569. O AREC 573 Agricultural Economics Policy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Goals and instruments of agricultural policy, model constructions with decision and control criteria; national, regional, and provincial agricultural application. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor; (AREC 313 or AG EC 416) and (AREC 502 or AG EC 502) recommended. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 573 and AG EC 573. O AREC 575 Agriculture in Developing Countries Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Role of agriculture in the economic growth of developing countries; influence of international trade and commodity agreements on economic development. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor; (AREC 475 or AG EC 475) and (AREC 502 or AG EC 502) recommended. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 575 and AG EC 575. AREC 582 Industrial Organization in Food and Resource Industries Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of firm behavior and market structure in agri-food and resource sectors using industrial organization principles. Introduction to the internal organization of firms with applications to incentives, contracts, and corporate finance. Other topics involve ownership forms such as co-operatives; impacts of market structure on selection of firm structure; and the importance of firm objectives, performance and management incentives. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, ECON 481 recommended. O AREC 584 Marketing Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Microeconomic theory and analysis of markets for agricultural and food products. Topics will vary with the evolution of the literature but may include alternative market structures, market regulation, empirical price analysis, advertising, location theories, the role of information in markets, the role of uncertainty in markets, and organization structures. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. (AREC 313 or AG EC 416) and (AREC 502 or AG EC 502) recommended. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 584 and AG EC 584. O AREC 585 Agricultural Trade Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Concepts and principles underlying international trade and specialization applied to agricultural and food products. Protection and its economic impacts. Agricultural trade policy, institutions and agreements. The role of agricultural trade in developed and less developed countries. Analysis of imperfect markets and alternative approaches to trade liberalization. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Credit will only be given for one of AREC 585 and AG EC 585. AREC 600 Directed Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Analysis of selected research problems and design of research projects in production economics, natural resource economics, or marketing economics. Prerequisite: consent of Department Chair. AREC 900 Directed Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned). Credit will only be given for one of AREC 900 and AG EC 900.

231.6

Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, AFNS Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

Note: See also Animal Science (AN SC), Environmental and Conservation Sciences (ENCS), Interdisciplinary (INT  D), Nutrition (NUTR), Nutrition and Food Science (NU FS), Plant Science (PL SC), Renewable Resources (REN R) and Soil Science (SOILS) for related courses.

Undergraduate Courses AFNS 414 Lipid Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Fundamentals in lipid biochemistry featuring learning modules of relevance to students of plant, food and animal science, and human nutrition, and other life science. Topics include characteristics of lipids, environmental effects on lipid metabolism, oilseed biotechnology and biomass solutions for petrochemical alternatives. Offered in alternate years commencing 2009/10. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 514). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 414 and 514. Prerequisites: (BIOCH 200 or PL SC 331 or 345) or consent of Instructor. AFNS 416 One Health Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). ‘One Health’ is an emerging paradigm in public and veterinary health which recognizes that human, animal and environmental health are interlinked. The course will address food and water safety, the increase in prevalence of antibiotic resistant organisms, emerging infectious zoonotic diseases, environmental protection and environmental sustainability, emphasizing the interaction of these diverse yet interconnected disciplines in protecting the health of populations. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 516).

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O AFNS 460 Applied Bioinformatics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Introduction to databases, software tools, and analysis methods used to characterize DNA and protein sequences. Topics include information retrieval from sequence databases, protein function prediction, assessing sequence similarity, biological pathway analysis, measuring gene expression, proteomics, and protein identification. Prerequisites: STAT 151 and (BIOL 207, BIOCH 200 or PL SC 331).

Graduate Courses Note: Prerequisites are shown to provide an indication of the background that is expected for these courses. Students not having the prerequisites for a course are encouraged to discuss their case with the course Instructor. AFNS 500 Individual Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Project or reading course under the supervision of a Faculty member requiring preparation of a comprehensive report. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: May be taken more than once provided the topic is different. AFNS 501 Advanced Human Metabolism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-1s-0). This is an advanced course that highlights recent developments in human metabolism research. Lectures in fundamentals of human metabolism and nutrition related to each topic will be presented to complement discussion and critical review of readings from primary research and review papers. Application of new findings to understanding of basic metabolic regulation and metabolic diseases will be addressed. Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in Nutrition, Biochemistry, Physiology or a related discipline and consent of Instructor. AFNS 502 Advanced Study of Food Fermentations Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-0). Readings and class presentations on current developments in bacterial or fungal fermentation of foods. Development in Probiotics. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 402, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 502 and NU FS 402. Prerequisite: MICRB 265 or NU FS 361 or 363. AFNS 503 Processing of Milk and Dairy Products Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-0). Technological principles of milk treatment and processes for fluid milk products; concentrated, dried, sterilized and fermented dairy products; cheese, butter and ice cream. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 403, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 503 and NU FS 403. Prerequisite: NU FS 374 or consent of Instructor. AFNS 504 Muscle Food Science and Technology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2). Biological, biochemical, chemical, and technological aspects of the processing of animal muscle food including seafood product technology. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 404, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 504 and NU FS 404. Prerequisite: Œ3 in Biochemistry. AFNS 506 Rangeland Plant Communities of Western Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Examines major rangeland plant communities and their physical environments in western Canada, including individual plant identification and ecology. Includes a review of various land uses such as livestock and wildlife grazing within these communities, their response to disturbances such as herbivory and fire, and other management considerations. Lectures and labs are the same as for ENCS 406, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 506 and ENCS 406. Prerequisite: ENCS 356 or consent of instructor. [Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science] AFNS 507 Science and Technology of Cereal and Oilseed Processing Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3/2). Biological, biochemical, chemical, and technological aspects of the processing of cereals and oilseeds. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 406, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 507 and NU FS 406. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. AFNS 510 Renewable Biomaterials Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Fundamentals in bio-based materials development, characterization, and applications. Sources and classification of biomaterials, synthesis of renewable polymeric biomaterials, their characterization using different techniques, and industrial applications will be discussed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 511 Veterinary Immunology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Application of immunological principles to the understanding of animal health and disease with a focus on livestock and companion animals. Students will apply a broad understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the basic mechanisms of disease progression to assess the short and long-term impact of pathogenesis to the health of animals, their caretakers,

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and consumers. Lectures will be followed by active discussion of selected readings. Lectures are the same as for AN SC 411, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 511 and AN SC 411. Prerequisite: (IMIN 200 or equivalent) and consent of instructor. AFNS 514 Lipid Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Fundamentals in lipid biochemistry featuring learning modules of relevance to students of plant, food and animal science, and human nutrition, and other life science. Topics include characteristics of lipids, environmental effects on lipid metabolism, oilseed biotechnology and biomass solutions for petrochemical alternatives. Offered in alternate years commencing 2009/10. Lectures are the same as for AFNS 414, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 514 and AFNS 414. Prerequisites: (BIOCH 200 or PL SC 331 or PL SC 345) or consent of Instructor. AFNS 516 One Health Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). ‘One Health’ is an emerging paradigm in public and veterinary health which recognizes that human, animal and environmental health are interlinked. The course will address food and water safety, the increase in prevalence of antibiotic resistant organisms, emerging infectious zoonotic diseases, environmental protection and environmental sustainability, emphasizing the interaction of these diverse yet interconnected disciplines in protecting the health of populations. Lectures and labs are the same as for AFNS 416, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 416, 516 or PHS 416, 516. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. AFNS 520 Ruminant Physiology and Metabolic Diseases Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A discussion-based course on current literature in digestive physiology, endocrinology, and metabolic diseases of ruminant animals. Offered only in odd numbered years. Prerequisite: Œ3 in each of Nutrition and Physiology. AFNS 521 Carcass and Meat Quality Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2). The conversion of muscle to meat in livestock and poultry: definitions and measurement of carcass and meat quality; influences of pre- and post-slaughter factors on carcass and meat quality. The lab will consist of a two-day field trip during Reading Week. Lectures and labs are the same as for AN SC 420, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 521 and AN SC 420. Prerequisites: Œ3 Biochemistry or AN SC 320 and consent of instructor. AFNS 524 Nutrition and Metabolism Related to Cancer Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). A lecture and reading course to address nutritional issues specifically related to cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 424, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 524, NU FS 424, ONCOL 524 and 424. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Offered jointly by the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science and the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry). [Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science]. AFNS 527 Nutritional Toxicology and Food Safety Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Providing students with an understanding of the principles of risk: benefit evaluations related to the metabolic consequences of exposure to foodborne chemicals and therapeutic agents, and to safety concerns about foods. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 427, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 527 and NU FS 427. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. AFNS 528 Advances in Functional Foods and Natural Health Products Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Overview of regulations, chemistry, bioavailability, nutrient interactions, bioactivity mechanisms and potential therapeutic role of non-nutritive components of functional foods and natural health products in the prevention of chronic disease. Seminars are the same as for NU FS 428, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 528 and NU FS 428. Prerequisite: One of NUTR 301, 302 or NU FS 305. Œ6 PHYSL recommended. AFNS 532 Advanced Food Protein Chemistry and Technology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Chemistry and technology of food protein purification, modification, structure and functional properties. Food related proteins from animal and plant sources will be discussed. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. AFNS 536 Advanced Topics in Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-2s-0). Exploration of the scientific literature in selected topics in Nutrition. Lectures in fundamentals of human nutrition related to each topic will be presented to compliment discussion and critical review of readings from primary research and review papers. Application of new findings to understanding of human nutrition will be addressed. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 436, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 536 and NU FS 436. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

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Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 416, 516 or PHS 416, 516. Prerequisites: Œ3 microbiology and Œ3 physiology or consent of instructor.

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522

University of Alberta

AFNS 543 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease and Lifestyle Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This is an advanced course examining the relationship between the role of lifestyle factors in the etiology and pathophysiology, as well as the treatment of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Application of recent findings to our understanding of these chronic metabolic diseases will be addressed. Lectures are the same as for NUTR 443, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 543 and NUTR 443. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 552 Nutrition in the Prevention of Chronic Human Diseases Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A lecture and reading course for graduate students which will address the scientific basis for nutritional intervention in the prevention of chronic human disease. Lectures are the same as for NUTR 452, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 552 and NUTR 452. Prerequisites: (NUTR 301 or 303) and (302 or 304) or consent of Instructor. AFNS 554 Unit Operations in Food Preservation Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Processes used in food preservation. Dehydration, freezing, sterilization and canning, irradiation and high pressure processing. Effect of processing on food properties. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 454, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 554 and NU FS 454. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 561 Ruminant Digestion, Metabolism, and Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Integration of theory and practical concepts in ruminant nutrition, digestion and metabolism through topics such as energy flow in ruminants, protein systems and net feed efficiency. Laboratories will involve formulation of rations for various physiological states of beef and dairy cattle, economical rations, feed mixes, protein systems (degradable and undegradable protein systems) and net feed efficiency formulations. Lectures and labs are the same as for AN SC 461, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 561 and AN SC 461. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 562 Swine Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Nutrient utilization and requirements, feed ingredients, and applied feeding program. Feed formulation strategies and current topics in swine nutrition will be discussed in detail. Lectures and labs are the same as for AN SC 462, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 562 and AN SC 462. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 563 Poultry Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Nutritional requirements, feeding programs, and feed ingredients used for poultry. Feed formulation strategies and current topics in poultry nutrition will be discussed extensively. Lectures and labs are the same as for AN SC 463, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AN SC 463, AFNS 515, and 563. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. AFNS 565 Plant Breeding Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course will focus on different plant breeding methods and their relationship to the major crop species, as well as use of different molecular and biotechnology techniques in plant breeding. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 565 and PL SC 465. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. AFNS 566 Advanced Food Microbiology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0). A lecture/discussion course on selected topics in food microbiology. Prerequisite: One of: (MICRB 265, NU FS 361, or 363) and consent of instructor. AFNS 568 Clinical Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Basic principles of nutrition in clinical situations. The role of diet in the management of various diseases. The laboratory sessions include practical experience in providing individualized nutritional care for clients from various cultural backgrounds. Lectures and labs are the same as for NUTR 468, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 568, NUTR 468 and NU FS 468. Pre- or corequisite: NUTR 301. AFNS 569 Advanced Animal Metabolism Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). A discussion-based course on selected topics in energy and nitrogen digestion and metabolism in domestic animals. Offered in even numbered years. Prerequisite: 400 level animal nutrition course and consent of instructor. AFNS 570 Experimental Procedures in Nutrition and Metabolism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Current methodologies in nutrition and metabolism. Prerequisites: NUTR 301 and 302 or equivalent, or consent of Instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for NUTR 504 or AFNS 570. AFNS 571 Applied Poultry Science Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Study of avian anatomy, physiology, behavior, and health as it relates to modern poultry production. Current management practices

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to optimize production efficiency and animal well-being are examined. Lectures and labs are the same as for AN SC 471, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 571 and AN SC 471. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or consent of Instructor. AFNS 572 Practical Case Studies in Rangeland Management and Conservation Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Cumulative effects of fire, grazing, browsing, and improvement practices on the productivity and species composition of range and pasture ecosystems, including management implications. Extended field trip prior to the start of classes. Lectures and labs are the same as for ENCS 471, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 572 and ENCS 471. Offered in alternate years commencing 2001-02. Prerequisite: ENCS 356; ENCS 406 strongly recommended. AFNS 574 Applied Beef Cattle Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Examination of current and potential future production and management practices to optimize production efficiency and animal well-being in the Canadian and international beef industry. Laboratories emphasize practical applications, field trips, and discussion. Lectures and labs are the same as for AN SC 474, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 574 and AN SC 474. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 575 Advanced Functional Genomics Technologies in Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Modular course offering training in a variety of research technologies. Modules offered will vary from term to term. Modules may include HPLC, gel electrophoresis, real-time PCR, gene isolation and cloning, gene amplification, cDNA library screening and microarray. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. AFNS 576 Applied Swine Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Evaluation of swine breeding, feeding, housing management, and disease prevention practices that optimize production efficiency and animal well-being. Laboratories involve analysis of production practices with a view to optimizing efficiency. Lectures and labs are the same as for AN SC 476, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 576 and AN SC 476. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or consent of Instructor. AFNS 577 Advanced Community Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Examination of nutrition problems in contemporary communities that relate to health promotion, food security, policy, program planning and community nutrition throughout the life cycle. Discussion of nutrition programs and resources. Students will develop the skills to write a community grant application. Lectures and labs are the same as for NUTR 477, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 577 and NUTR 477. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 578 Advanced Clinical Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). The principles of diet therapy in selected areas of current interest. Emphasis on case studies, research and practical problems in clinical dietetics. Lectures and labs are the same as for NUTR 476, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 578 and NUTR 476. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. AFNS 579 Advanced Nutrition: Vitamins and Inorganic Elements Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). A lecture and reading course in vitamins and inorganic elements. Introduction to seminar presentation and critical evaluation of current literature. Students will also learn the skill of writing a scientific paper. Lectures are the same as for NUTR 479, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 579, NUTR 479, and NU FS 479. Prerequisite: NUTR 302. NUTR 301 (or 303) recommended. AFNS 580 Advanced Study of Foodborne Pathogens Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-0). Emerging issues in microbiological safety of foods. Reading and class presentations on current developments in the microbiological safety of foods. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 480, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 580 and NU FS 480. Prerequisite: MICRB 265 or NU FS 361 or 363. AFNS 581 Advanced Foods Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Critical evaluation of current literature on the effects of ingredients and processing on quality characteristics of foods. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 481, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 581 and NU FS 481. Prerequisites: NU FS 374 and Œ3 Biochemistry or consent of instructor. AFNS 582 Diseases of Field and Horticultural Crops Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Diseases of cereal, oilseed, pulse, forage, vegetable, fruit, and ornamental crops. Course is the same as PL SC 481, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Offered in alternate

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AFNS 585 Advanced Quantitative Genomics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Genetics and analysis of quantitative traits in farm animals and plants. Detecting, locating and measuring effects of quantitative trait loci (QTL). Recent developments in QTL mapping and discovery. The laboratory sessions include commonly used software for analyzing data from breeding and genomics experiments. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. AFNS 595 Integrated Crop Protection Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Integrated agronomic, mechanical, biological, and chemical control of insects, disease organisms, and weeds that interfere with field crop and horticultural crop production. Lectures are the same as for PL SC 495, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 595 and PL SC 495. Prerequisites: At least two of ENT 207, PL SC 352 or PL SC 380 as prerequisites and the third as a corequisite. AFNS 599 Advanced Agri-Chemical Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Advanced analysis of food and agri-industrial materials with a focus on good laboratory practices (GLP), chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC), mass spectrometry, and other modern techniques from sample preparation to analysis of data. Lectures are the same as for NU FS 499, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 599 and NU FS 499. Prerequisite: NU FS 372 or consent of Instructor. AFNS 601 Seminar Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-2s-0). Covers specialized topics of current interest to graduate students in AFNS. Presentations by students, faculty and invited speakers. Students register in one of four sections - Animal Science, Plant Science, Food Science or Human Nutrition. Attendance is required of all graduate students throughout their program. MSc students normally register for one term in year 2, and are required to present one seminar; PhD students normally register for one term in each of year 1 and 3, and are required to present one seminar per term. Only open to graduate students in AFNS. AFNS 602 Graduate Reading Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Individual study. Critical reviews of selected literature under the direction of a Faculty member. Note: May be taken more than once if the topic is different. Prerequisite: consent of Department. AFNS 603 Graduate Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Directed laboratory study under supervision of a Faculty member. Note: May be taken more than once if the topic is different. Prerequisite: consent of Department. AFNS 660 Communication in Science Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Course designed for graduate students in the early stages of their graduate program. Students will learn effective communication skills for life as a graduate student and a future scientist. Topics will include the scientific method; paper, thesis and grant writing; poster and lecture development and delivery; ethics in science; graduate student supervisor relationships. Open only to graduate students in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science. Preference given to those in the first year of their program. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. AFNS 670 Current Topics in Nutrition and Metabolism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in digestive physiology, fat/ carbohydrate/protein metabolism, vitamins/minerals, dietary modulation of function or ruminant nutrition. May be taken for credit more than once. AFNS 680 Doctoral Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Discussion and presentations based on current topics to provide PhD candidates with experience and understanding in advanced nutrition. Students also learn about research funding and how to develop a major grant application. Credit cannot obtained for NU FS 680 and AFNS 680.

skills. This course focuses on interpersonal communication in professional settings, examining factors that enhance or impede communication and exploring strategies for communicating more effectively with different audiences. Students develop written, visual, and oral communication skills that help them connect with others both in and outside the organization, and convey information in positive and persuasive ways. Open only to Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences students. [Human Ecology] ALES 291 Topics in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences Œ3-6 (variable) (variable, variable). Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. ALES 391 Topics in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences Œ3-6 (variable) (variable, variable). Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year. ALES 491 Topics in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences Œ3-6 (variable) (variable, variable). Offered by various departments depending upon the content of the course in a given year.

231.8

American Sign Language, ASL Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies Faculty of Arts

Notes (1) The Department reserves the right to place students in the language course appropriate to their level of language skill. (2) Placement tests may be administered in order to assess prior background. Students with an American Sign Language background should consult a Department advisor. Such students may be granted advanced placement and directed to register in an advanced course more suitable to their level of ability. Students seeking to fulfill their Language Other than English requirement may begin at any one appropriate level, but must take the full Œ6 in one language. (3) The Department will withhold credit from students completing courses for which prior background is deemed to make them ineligible. For example, 100-level courses are normally restricted to students with little or no prior knowledge in that language. Should a student with matriculation standing, or those possessing prior background (such as native speakers or those for whom it is their first language) register in the 100-level course, credit may be withheld.

Undergraduate Courses O ASL 111 Beginners’ American Sign Language I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). Designed to provide basic practical communication and conversational skill in American Sign Language for students with little or no previous background. Covers material in matriculation-level ASL. Note: Not to be taken by students with native or near native proficiency, or students with credit in ASL 35 or its equivalents in Canada or other countries. Not to be taken by students with credit in EDPY 474 or 565. O ASL 112 Beginners’ American Sign Language II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). Prerequisite: ASL 111 or consent of Department. Note: Not to be taken by students with native or near native proficiency, or students with credit in ASL 35 or its equivalents in Canada or other countries. O ASL 211 Intermediate American Sign Language I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). Intensive instruction in ASL Topics covered on deaf community and culture. Prerequisite: ASL 35 or ASL 112 or consent of Department.

AFNS 900 Directed Research Project (Course-based Masters) Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). Individual study supervised by the student’s supervisor, requiring the preparation of a comprehensive report, presentation of a seminar and oral examination by the student’s supervisor and one additional faculty member. Open only to students in the MAg, MEng or MSc course-based program.

O ASL 212 Intermediate American Sign Language II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). Prerequisite: ASL 211 or consent of Department.

231.7

Cours de 1er cycle

Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, ALES

231.9

Anatomie, ANATE Faculté Saint-Jean

Undergraduate Courses

ANATE 140 Anatomie Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Introduction aux structures du corps humain. Doit être complété avant l’année 2 du BScInf (bilingue). Notes: La priorité sera accordée aux étudiants du BScInf (bilingue). Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour NURS 140.

ALES 204 Communication Fundamentals for Professionals Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Successful professionals require strong communication

ANATE 409 Histologie Humaine Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-3). Ce cours d’introduction à l’histologie

Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

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years commencing in 2002-03. Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 582 and PL SC 481. Prerequisite: PL SC 380 or consent of instructor.

523

University of Alberta

Course Listings A

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mettra l’accent sur la reconnaissance et l’identification de la structure et de l’organisation cellulaire associée à la physiologie normale des divers tissus et organes du corps humain. Ce cours comportera une part égale de cours théoriques et de laboratoires étant donné qu’il est essentiel d’acquérir et développer le sens de l’observation nécessaire à l’étude de l’histologie. Ce cours devrait permettre une compréhension de la relation étroite entre l’histologie, la physiologie et la pratique médicale. Préalables: BIOLE 201, PHYSE 210, ou PHYSL 210, ou PHYSL 212 et 214, ou ZOOL 241 et 242.

231.10

Anatomy, ANAT Division of Anatomy Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

Undergraduate Courses O ANAT 200 Human Morphology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introductory survey course in general human anatomy. The course covers the gross and microscopic anatomy of the tissues, organs and organ systems of the body, with emphasis on the relationships, interactions and functions of major structures. ANAT 305 Cross-Sectional Anatomy Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-2). A study of human gross anatomy from a regional perspective, with a particular emphasis on cross-sectional structure and threedimensional relationships. Students will apply their knowledge to correlate prosected human cadaveric specimens with radiological images derived from a variety of techniques. This course is intended to prepare students who are considering a career in applied radiological imaging and radiotherapy. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or permission of the Department. O ANAT 400 Human Embryonic Development Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). A study of the development of the human embryo from conception to birth. The development of cells, tissues and organs of specific major structures will be covered including their relative development to other systems and structures. An understanding of anomalous development and the ability to survive will be included based on a thorough understanding of normal development. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or consent of Division. Note: Credit will be granted for only one of ANAT 300 or 400. O ANAT 401 Human Neuroanatomy Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A study of the human nervous system including its development and function from an anatomical viewpoint. Both the central and peripheral nervous systems will be presented with some emphasis on abnormal development and its consequences. There will be an emphasis on clinical application where appropriate. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or consent of Division. Note: Credit will be granted for only one of ANAT 301 or 401. O ANAT 402 Human Histology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). A detailed study of the histology of the tissues and organ systems of the human body and the structural principles that govern their organization, interaction and physiological function. Will be based on selfstudy, utilizing an interactive, web-based learning program, and group discussions during weekly seminar sessions. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or equivalent and consent of Division. O ANAT 403 The Human Body Œ6 (fi 12) (first term, 3-0-5). A detailed, regional study of the gross anatomy of the human body using functional, clinical, and evolutionary perspectives. Will include lectures and laboratory sessions involving dissection of human cadavers. Prerequisite: ANAT 200 or equivalent and consent of Division. O ANAT 490 Individual Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Registration is contingent upon a student having made prior arrangements with a Faculty member in the Division. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. This is primarily a supervised self-study in any of the anatomical disciplines. Prerequisite: consent of Division. O ANAT 491 Current Topics in Anatomy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-0). Discussion of topics relevant to the anatomical disciplines. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. Prerequisite: consent of Division. O ANAT 497 Research Project Œ4-8 (variable) (variable, variable). Directed research carried out in the laboratory of an assigned member of the Division. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. Successful completion requires a written report and oral presentation on the research project. Registration is contingent upon a student having made prior arrangements with a Faculty member in the Division. Prerequisite: consent of Division.

Graduate Courses O ANAT 600 Medical Gross Anatomy Œ8 (fi 16) (two term, 0-0-12). Advanced study of human gross anatomy. Will entail

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supervised, self-directed, hands-on dissection by the student for the examination of human structure and function. Particular emphasis will be placed on the clinical relevance of Human Anatomy and its importance to clinical medicine. Prerequisite: consent of Division. O ANAT 603 Medical Histology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-1). Advanced study of human histology with an emphasis on the relevance of histological examination to clinical medicine. Students will participate in discussions and complete a web-based interactive program. Prerequisite: consent of Division. O ANAT 604 Medical Embryology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1). Advanced study of human development from conception to birth with particular reference to clinical issues in humans. Lectures will be supplemented with practical examination of specimens. Prerequisite: consent of Division. O ANAT 606 Selected Topics in Advanced Human Anatomy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3). An in-depth, supervised, self-directed study focussing on topics relevant to the anatomical disciplines. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. Registration is contingent upon a student having made prior arrangements with a Faculty member in the Division. Prerequisite: consent of Division. O ANAT 607 Current Topics in Human Anatomy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-0). Discussion of topics relevant to the anatomical disciplines. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. Prerequisite: consent of Division.

231.11

Andragogie, ANDR Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 2e cycle ANDR 520 Formation expérientielle à la dynamique de groupe Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 1-2s-0). Les concepts de groupe, d’organisation et d’institution. La dynamique de groupe: définition, ses différentes étapes, son utilisation dans le groupe de tâche et d’apprentissage. Préalable: ANDR 510.

231.12

Anglais, ANGL Faculté Saint-Jean

Notes (1) Only one Œ6 or two Œ3 courses at the 100 level can be credited to the BA program. (2) Prerequisite for 200, 300, and 400 level courses is Œ6 of junior level English/ Anglais. (3) Œ6 of junior level English/Anglais can include ANGL 111 (Œ6) or ANGL 113 (Œ6), or ANGL 122 (Œ3) and ANGL 126 (Œ3), (4) ANGL 102 was previously the final course in the series of Anglais langue seconde courses (ALS). It does not qualify for credit toward the required Œ6 of junior level English/Anglais. (see §183.5.2 and notes §231.13). (5) ANGL 102 is now called ALS 125. The course remains the same.

Undergraduate Courses O ANGL 111 Language, Literature and Culture Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-0). Studies in the literary and cultural uses of language. Not to be taken by students with Œ6 in approved junior English/Anglais including ANGL 101. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 30-1 or ANGL 102 or ALS 125 or equivalent. O ANGL 113 English Literature in Global Perspective Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-0). Studies in the literatures of the English-speaking world. Not to be taken by students with Œ6 in approved junior English/Anglais including ANGL 101. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 30-1 or ANGL 102 or ALS 125 or equivalent. O ANGL 122 Texts and Contexts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course explores a specific issue using a variety of genres and media. Not to be taken by students with Œ6 in approved junior English/Anglais including ANGL 101, 111, 113. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 30-1 or ANGL 102 or ALS 125 or equivalent. O ANGL 126 Exploring Writing Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). This workshop course focuses on both the theory and practice of the writing process to help students experience firsthand how university writers enter into rich ongoing conversations by engaging with the words and ideas of others. Prerequisite: English Language Arts 30-1 or ANGL 102 or ALS 125 or equivalent. Note: Not to be taken by students with credits in WRS 101.

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O ANGL 328 Canadian Women’s Narrative Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected works of different genres by Canadian women writers and filmmakers in English or in French. Content and period focus may vary. Prerequisite: Œ6 in junior Anglais/English, French Language and Literature, and/or Comparative Literature, and knowledge of French and English. O ANGL 429 Canadian Cultural Narratives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selection of Canadian literary, cinematic, and mediatic narratives from French and English Canada, considering the perspective of their relationship to one another both within the Canadian multicultural context and that of world politics. Prerequisite: Œ6 in junior Anglais/English, French Language and Literature, and/or Comparative Literature, and knowledge of French and English.

231.13

Anglais langue seconde, ALS Faculté Saint-Jean

Notes (1) La série de cours d’Anglais langue seconde sont: ALS 105, 110, 115, 120 et ALS 125. (2) Les cours ALS 105, 110, 115, et ALS 125 se destinent aux étudiants qui ne disposent pas de la base nécessaire pour satisfaire aux exigences des cours ANGL 111, 113, 122 et ANGL 126. (3) Affectation par test de placement obligatoire (voir §183.5.2) pour tous les cours ALS 105, 110, 115, 120 et ALS 125.

Cours de 1er cycle O ALS 105 Niveau élémentaire 1 Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-2). Étude des éléments et des structures de base de l’anglais parlé et écrit. Note : Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ANGL 113, ESL ou EAP 140, 145, 150, ALS 100, 110, 115, 120, 125, 160, ANGL 102 ou leurs équivalents. Affectation par test de placement obligatoire. Veuillez consulter l’article « Test obligatoire pour les étudiants ne présentant pas English 30 ou l’équivalent » dans la section de Faculté Saint-Jean de l’annuaire. O ALS 110 Niveau élémentaire 2 Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-2). Étude des éléments et des structures de base de l’anglais parlé et écrit. Note : Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ANGL 113, ESL ou EAP 140, 145, 150, ALS 100, 115, 120, 125, 160, ANGL 102 ou leurs équivalents. Affectation par test de placement obligatoire ou préalable ALS 105. Veuillez consulter l’article « Test obligatoire pour les étudiants ne présentant pas English 30 ou l’équivalent » dans la section de Faculté Saint-Jean de l’annuaire. O ALS 115 Niveau intermédiaire 1 Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-2). Étude des éléments et des structures complexes de l’anglais parlé et écrit. Note : Anciennement ANGL 113 et ALS 160. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ANGL 113, ESL ou EAP 140, 145, 150, ALS 120, 125, 160, ANGL 102 ou leurs équivalents. Affectation par test de placement obligatoire ou préalable ALS 110. Veuillez consulter l’article « Test obligatoire pour les étudiants ne présentant pas English 30 ou l’équivalent » dans la section de Faculté SaintJean de l’annuaire. O ALS 120 Niveau intermédiaire 2 Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-2). Étude des éléments et des structures complexes de l’anglais parlé et écrit. Note : Anciennement ANGL 113 et ALS 160. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ESL ou EAP 140, 145, 150, ALS 125, 160, ANGL 102 ou leurs équivalents. Affectation par test de placement obligatoire ou préalable ALS 115. Veuillez consulter l’article « Test obligatoire pour les étudiants ne présentant pas English 30 ou l’équivalent » dans la section de Faculté Saint-Jean de l’annuaire. O ALS 125 Introduction à l’anglais écrit, niveau universitaire Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-2). Vise à faire acquérir les compétences communicatives écrites nécessaires à l’expression courante de niveau universitaire. Note: Anciennement ANGL 102. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ESL ou EAP 140, 145, 150, ALS 160, ANGL 102 ou leurs équivalents. Affectation par test de placement obligatoire ou préalable ALS 120. Veuillez consulter l’article « Test obligatoire pour les étudiants ne présentant pas English.

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O ALS 130 Pratique avancée de l’expression et de la compréhension orales Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-2). Vise à faire acquérir les compétences communicatives en anglais nécessaires à l’expression orale de niveau universitaire. Affectation par test de placement obligatoire ou préalable ALS 125.

231.14

Animal Science, AN SC Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

Note: See also Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science (AFNS), Environmental and Conservation Sciences (ENCS), Interdisciplinary (INT  D), Nutrition (NUTR), Nutrition and Food Science (NU FS), Plant Science (PL SC), and Renewable Resources (REN R) for related courses.

Undergraduate Courses O AN SC 100 Introduction to Animal Health Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An orientation to current issues and challenges related to animal health and disease in a global context. An interdisciplinary overview of the role and importance of animal health in modern society and its relationship to agriculture, food safety and human health. Causes of disease and the principles of maintaining healthy animals. The history and development of animal health professions and their roles. Not available to students who have credit in AN SC 375. Not available to students with Œ90 in ALES or Science without consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Biology 30. O AN SC 110 Introduction to Equine Science Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Introduction to horses and the horse industry. Principles of equine anatomy, physiology, nutrition, ecology, behavior, genetics, health and welfare. Not available to students with Œ90 in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences or Science without consent of instructor. O AN SC 120 Companion Animals and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Diverse and evolving roles of companion animals in human society. Pets and the companion animal industry. Topics include: behavior, cognition and training; breeds and breeding; performance; nutrition, health and physiology. Not available to students with Œ90 in Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences or Science without consent of Instructor. O AN SC 200 Principles of Animal Agriculture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Principles and practices of modern animal production and management. Brief introduction to the structure of the livestock, poultry, and game ranching industries. Principles of animal management, breeding and feeding. Current issues in animal agriculture. Students gain direct experience with animals in production/research environments. Prerequisite: Biology 30. O AN SC 260 Fundamentals of Animal Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Function, metabolism, homeostasis, requirements and sources of nutrients and energy for animals. Laboratory will involve principles of diet formulation. Prerequisite: Œ3 in university-level biology or chemistry. Credit will be given for only one of AN SC 260, NUTR 260 and 301 or equivalent. AN SC 310 Physiology of Domestic Animals Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Fundamental principles of regulation and maintenance of the internal environment. Includes a review of mechanisms providing for homeorrhesis and well-being of domestic animals in response to changes in the external environment (e.g., light, temperature, social). Prerequisites: BIOL 107 and Œ6 in university-level chemistry. AN SC 311 Metabolic Physiology of Domestic Animals Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). The physiological basis of the metabolic processes in domestic animals. Includes a review of the physiological mechanisms and neuroendocrine regulation of digestion, metabolism, growth and lactation. Prerequisite: AN SC 310 or equivalent. AN SC 312 Reproductive Physiology of Domestic Animals Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). The physiological basis of reproduction, fertility and embryonic development in domestic animals in relation to animal productivity. The study of the physiological mechanisms regulating gonadal function, fertilization, implantation, pregnancy and parturition as well as the physiological basis for sound reproductive management. Prerequisite: AN SC 310 or equivalent. O AN SC 318 Influence of Microorganisms on Animal Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Fundamentals of interactions between microorganisms and animals and how these interactions integrate with animal production and improvement of animal health. Emphasis on the evolution and ecology of the microbial inhabitants with the host and the underlying molecular mechanisms of the host microbial interactions. Pre- or corequisite: MICRB 265 or BIOL 207. O AN SC 320 Livestock Growth and Meat Production Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-0). Concepts of growth and development applied to meat production from farm livestock. Form and function of bone, muscle and

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ANGL 227 Advanced Expository Writing and Communication Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). A workshop course on writing and communication. It focuses on genre knowledge, rhetorical knowledge, discourse community knowledge and writing process knowledge. The course will utilize write-to-learn and process-oriented writing strategies as ways to enhance students’ ability to articulate course content and to engage in disciplinary writing, research and communication. Prerequisite: Œ6 of junior Anglais (ANGL).

525

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526

University of Alberta

fat. Livestock and carcass appraisal. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or Œ3 in university level biology. O AN SC 375 Animal Health and Disease Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Principles of maintaining healthy animals, and an examination of current issues related to animal health and disease. Infectious and non-infectious diseases that affect both animal and human health and may impact international trade and export. Disease surveillance, pathophysiology, treatment, prevention, management and economic impact of specific diseases and risks of bioterrorism. Prerequisite: AN SC 100 and 200 or consent of instructor. AN SC 310 or PHYSL 210 or (ZOOL 241 and 242) are recommended. O AN SC 376 Animal Welfare Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). An overview of animal welfare as it relates to both food and companion animals. Discussion of the scientific and ethical components that underlie our evaluation of the quality of life that animals experience. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or (Œ3 biology and consent of instructor) and Œ60. O AN SC 377 Food Animal Behaviour Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Basic behaviour principles for food animal species including their application in livestock production systems. Fundamentals of experimental research and design in applied ethology. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or consent of instructor and Œ60. O AN SC 378 Companion Animal Behaviour Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Basic behaviour principles for companion animal species such as dogs, cats, and horses, including application of fundamental training and learning techniques to resolve common behaviour problems. Prerequisite: AN SC 120 or consent of instructor and Œ60. O AN SC 391 Metabolism Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Emphasis on metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, nucleic acids and lipids. Prerequisite: PL SC 331 or Œ3 in Biochemistry. O AN SC 400 Individual Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Project or reading course supervised by a Faculty member, requiring preparation of a comprehensive report. Prerequisites: Third year standing or higher and consent of Department. Note: May be taken more than once if topic is different. O AN SC 410 Regulation of Reproduction in Domestic Animals Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-0). Study of basic physiological mechanisms involved in the control of reproduction in domesticated animals as a basis for developing practical approaches for the regulation of reproductive processes. Prerequisite: AN SC 312 or consent of Instructor. O AN SC 411 Veterinary Immunology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Application of immunological principles to the understanding of animal health and disease with a focus on livestock and companion animals. Students will apply a broad understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the basic mechanisms of disease progression to assess the short and long-term impact of pathogenesis to the health of animals, their caretakers, and consumers. Lectures will be followed by active discussion of selected readings. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 511). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 511 and AN SC 411. Prerequisite: (IMIN 200 or equivalent) and consent of instructor. O AN SC 420 Carcass and Meat Quality Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2). The conversion of muscle to meat in livestock and poultry: definitions and measurement of carcass and meat quality; influences of pre- and post-slaughter factors on carcass and meat quality. The lab will consist of a two day field trip during Reading Week. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 521). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 521 and AN SC 420. Prerequisite: Œ3 Biochemistry or AN SC 320, or consent of instructor. O AN SC 461 Ruminant Digestion, Metabolism, and Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Integration of theory and practical concepts in ruminant nutrition, digestion and metabolism through topics such as energy flow in ruminants, protein systems and net feed efficiency. Laboratories will involve formulation of rations for various physiological states of beef and dairy cattle, economical rations, feed mixes, protein systems (degradable and undegradable protein systems) and net feed efficiency formulations. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 561). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 561 and AN SC 461. Prerequisite: AN SC 260or Œ3 NUTR. Corequisite: AN SC 311. O AN SC 462 Swine Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Nutrient utilization and requirements, feed ingredients, and applied feeding programs for swine. Feed formulation strategies and current topics in swine nutrition will be discussed in detail. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 562). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 562 and AN SC 462. Prerequisite: AN SC 260, Œ3 NUTR or NU FS 305. Corequisite: AN SC 311 or Œ6 Physiology or consent of Instructor. O AN SC 463 Poultry Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Nutritional requirements, feeding programs and feed ingredients used for poultry. Feed formulation strategies and current topics in

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poultry nutrition will be discussed extensively. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 563). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 515, 563 and AN SC 463. Prerequisite: AN SC 260, Œ3 NUTR or NU FS 305. Corequisite: AN SC 311 or Œ6 Physiology or consent of Instructor. O AN SC 464 Companion Animal Nutrition Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Aimed at fourth year undergraduate students with an interest in companion animal nutrition. The course will focus on nutrient utilization and requirements of dogs, cats, and horses. Other companion animal species (mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians, etc.) will also be covered. Current issues in pet food nutrition and manufacture will be discussed. Prerequisite: AN  SC 260, Œ3NUTR or NU FS 305. O AN SC 471 Applied Poultry Science Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Study of avian anatomy, physiology, behavior, and health as it relates to modern poultry production. Current management practices to optimize production efficiency and animal well-being are examined. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 571). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 571 and AN SC 471. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or consent of Instructor. O AN SC 472 Applied Dairy Production Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Examination of the structure of the dairy industry, evaluation of management practices to optimize production efficiency and animal well-being, and integration of nutritional, physiological, and biochemical processes involved in production of quality milk. Laboratories emphasize practical applications, field trips, and discussion. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 and AN SC 260, or consent of Instructor. O AN SC 474 Applied Beef Cattle Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Examination of current and potential future production and management practices to optimize production efficiency and animal well-being in the Canadian and international beef industry. Laboratories emphasize practical applications, field trips, and discussion. Intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 574). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 574 and AN SC 474. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or consent of Instructor. O AN SC 476 Applied Swine Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Evaluation of swine breeding, feeding, housing management, and disease prevention practices that optimize production efficiency and animal well-being. Laboratories involve analysis of production practices with a view to optimizing efficiency. Graduate students may not register for credit (see AFNS 576). Credit will only be given for one of AFNS 576 and AN SC 476. Prerequisite: AN SC 200 or consent of Instructor. AN SC 479 Integrative Project in Animal Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-3). A team-based capstone course exploring broad areas of animal agriculture. Students will work in groups with mentors on a project involving experiential learning and skill development related to the field. Open only to fourth-year students in BSc Agriculture, Animal Science Major. O AN SC 484 Animal Molecular Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Lecture and discussion course dealing with concepts in gene expression, gene manipulation, and application of molecular biology to animal biotechnology. Prerequisites: BIOCH 203/205, or 200/310 or PL SC 331 and AN SC 391, or consent of Instructor. O AN SC 485 Animal Genetic Improvement Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-2). Application of genetic/genomic principles and methods to the improvement of livestock and poultry. Topics include Mendelian inheritance, basic concepts of quantitative genetics/genomics, definitions of genetic parameters, principles and methods for genetic evaluation, prediction of genetic change and application of mating systems. Credit will only be given for one of AN SC 385 and 485. Prerequisite: BIOL 207. AN SC 496 Research on the Human Animal Bond Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Exploration of research methods and measures; critical appraisal of research on the human-animal bond; application of research findings to the improvement of human and animal welfare. Students will conduct library and empirical research in the laboratory component. Prerequisites: (AN SC 378 and PSYCO 281) or (Œ90 and consent of instructor). AN SC 499 Animal Health Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-3). A team-based capstone course exploring broad areas of animal health. Students will work in groups with mentors on a project involving experiential learning and skill development related to the field. Open only to fourth-year students in BSc Animal Health Program.

Graduate Courses Notes (1) 400-level courses in AN  SC may be taken for credit by graduate students under certain circumstances with approval of the student’s supervisor or supervisory committee. A 300-level course may be taken for credit by graduate

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University of Alberta

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ANTHR 207 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-1s-0). Comparative study of human society and culture, particularly non-Western communities, with special attention to the family, social structure, economics and political institutions, and religion; processes of change.

231.15

ANTHR 208 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The anthropological study of language and communication. A brief survey of field and analytical methods and the theory of linguistic anthropology.

Anthropologie, ANTHE Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle O ANTHE 101 Introduction à l’anthropologie Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Une introduction à l’anthropologie par l’étude de concepts principaux et d’idées organisatrices tels que l’évolution humaine, l’apparition de la culture, l’organisation sociale, les théories de la culture, les systèmes symboliques, la dynamique de la culture. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits en ANTHE 202 ou 201. O ANTHE 110 Ethnologie du sexe, de l’âge et du pouvoir Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Dans toute société, le statut social de l’individu et des groupes change au cours du cycle de la vie. Ce cours examine comment l’âge et le sexe privilégient les rôles et le statut social dans des sociétés différentes. O ANTHE 207 Introduction à l’anthropologie sociale et culturelle Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Étude comparative de la société et de la culture humaine, en insistant sur la famille, la structure sociale, l’économie, les institutions politiques et la religion, les procédures de changement, et l’histoire de l’anthropologie sociale et culturelle. Peut comprendre des sections Alternative Delivery; veuillez consulter le Fees Payment Guide dans la section University Regulations and Information for Students de l’annuaire. Note(s): Œ3 en ANTHE ou ANTHR sont fortement recommandés. O ANTHE 208 Introduction à l’anthropologie linguistique Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Étude anthropologique du langage et de la communication. Aperçu rapide des méthodes d’enquête sur le terrain et des méthodes analytiques et théorie de l’anthropologie linguistique. Note(s): Œ3 en ANTHE ou ANTHR sont fortement recommandés O ANTHE 320 Ethnologie de la religion Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Introduction à l’étude comparative des religions et des phénomènes qui s’y rattachent; tels la magie, les tabous, le chamanisme et la sorcellerie. Des exemples ethnographiques sont utilisés pour appuyer une analyse des liens entre pensées et rites religieux et autres aspects de la vie sociale. Note(s): Œ3 en ANTHE ou ANTHR ou autre science sociale, niveau 100 sont fortement recommandés O ANTHE 365 Culture populaire Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Exploration approfondie de la culture populaire utilisant différentes approches théoriques et l’application des concepts de l’Anthropologie. Préalable(s): Œ3 en ANTHE, ou autre science sociale, niveau 100. ANTHE 393 Culture et santé Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). D’une perspective multiculturelle et comparative : étude des croyances et des activités sociales associées à la santé et la guérison. Préalable(s) : Œ3 en ANTHE, ou autre cours de science sociale, niveau 100.

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Anthropology, ANTHR Department of Anthropology Faculty of Arts

Undergraduate Courses O ANTHR 101 Introductory Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Approaches to the study of Anthropology through the study of human biological, cultural and linguistic diversity, past and present. O ANTHR 110 Gender, Age, and Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An anthropological review and comparison of cultures in terms of social positions based on differences in sex and age. O ANTHR 150 Race and Racism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The challenge of racism in modern societies and the response of anthropology, including the history of how the ‘race’ concept has been used to explain human variation. ANTHR 206 Introduction to Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Introduction to the nature, purposes, theory and methods of anthropological archaeology. Emphasis on principles of reconstruction of past societies from archaeological evidence and the explanation of cultural evolution.

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ANTHR 209 Introduction to Biological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Survey of theory and basic data in human evolution and human variation. Topics include primatology, osteology, hominoid paleontology, variation in modern populations. O ANTHR 219 World Prehistory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of the archaeological evidence for human cultural evolution. O ANTHR 230 Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Science as a cultural practice, cultural effects and globalization of technology, changing views of nature, gender and science, traditional ecological knowledge, and the evolution of technology. O ANTHR 256 Alberta Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to Alberta’s past as reconstructed by archaeology. O ANTHR 286 Topics in Regional Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Consult the Department and/or the schedule of classes for the specific topics offered. Variable content course which may be repeated if topic(s) vary. O ANTHR 287 Topics in Asian Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Consult the Department and/or the schedule of classes for the specific topics offered. Variable content course which may be repeated if topic(s) vary. ANTHR 310 The Anthropology of Gender Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A comparative, cross-cultural, and cross-species perspective on biological and social aspects of sex and gender differences. Prerequisite: ANTHR 110 or 207 or 209 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 311 North American Prehistory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of prehistory and cultural development in North America. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. ANTHR 312 Lower Palaeolithic Prehistory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Development of prehistoric culture in Europe, Africa and Asia during the Lower Palaeolithic. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 313 Middle and Upper Palaeolithic Prehistory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Development of prehistoric culture in Europe, Africa, and Asia during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 318 Political Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to modern political anthropology with emphasis on origins of state structure, relations between non-state and state societies, and problems of pluralism and stratification. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 320 Anthropology of Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of anthropological approaches to religions and related phenomena including magic, taboo, shamanism and witchcraft. Emphasis on the connection between religious ideas and practices and other aspects of social life in a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. ANTHR 321 Religions of China in Practice Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Contemporary Chinese religious culture as practiced in the family, community, voluntary associations, and the political sphere. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 278 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 322 Anthropological Perspectives on Discursive Practices Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Cultural constructions of narrative and discourse; interethnic communication, including discourse in the courtroom, classroom, and work settings; code choice; and communication via electronic media. Prerequisite: ANTHR 208 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 323 Ecological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A consideration of the relationships between culture and the environment. Problems involving the application of basic ecological concepts and principles to human societies and evaluation of various explanatory frameworks regarding cultural adaptations. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or 207 or consent of Department.

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A Course Listings

students under certain circumstances with approval of the AFNS Graduate Program Committee. See §174.1.1(1). (2) See also Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science (AFNS) listings for related courses.

Course Listings A

528

University of Alberta

ANTHR 324 Economic Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the literature and controversies within the field, emphasizing systems of exchange. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 332 Anthropology of Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Contemporary views of the nature of science, including debates about science’s universalism, objectives, and culture-bound epistemologies. Prerequisite: ANTHR 230, or one of 206 to 209, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 350 Kinship and Social Structure Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Anthropological approaches to kinship systems and other concepts of social organization, emphasizing non-western societies. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 213 or consent of Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ANTHR 351, 413, or 450. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 372 Anthropology of Food Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relationship between food and culture through historical and cross-cultural analysis of foodways. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 385 Topics in Social Cultural Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department for the specific topics offered and any recommended courses to be completed prior to registering. ANTHR 390 Human Osteology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Lecture and laboratory study of human skeletal biology, emphasizing the identification of bones and an understanding of human functional anatomy. Prerequisite: ANTHR 209 or consent of Department. ANTHR 391 Hominid Evolution Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of the fossil evidence for human evolution. Prerequisite: ANTHR 209 or consent of Department. ANTHR 393 Health and Healing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A cross-cultural study through time of the beliefs and social activities associated with health, illness and healing. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 209 or consent of Department. ANTHR 396 Archaeological Field Training Œ6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, 3-0-3). Instruction in all practical aspects of archaeological field techniques, including excavation, survey, recording, photography, and conservation. This course can be applied to the Canadian content requirement when held at a Canadian site. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 or equivalent, and consent of Department. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. ANTHR 401 Ethnographic Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Discussion of issues in methodology and field methods. Restricted to senior undergraduate students. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 404 Mortuary Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Theory and method applied to the interpretation of treatment of the dead in prehistoric and historic contexts. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or 209, or consent of Department. ANTHR 407 Paleopathology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). A detailed survey of disease processes in antiquity as expressed in skeletal and preserved tissues. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 415 History of Anthropological Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major theoretical trends in social and cultural anthropology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisites: ANTHR 207 or 208 and a 300- or 400-level anthropology course, or consent of Department. ANTHR 417 Anthropology of Modernity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). The course investigates recent works that theorize modernity (globalization, transnationalism, the impact of new technologies) from an ethnographic perspective. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 208 and a 300- or 400-level ANTHR course, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 420 Anthropology and the Twentieth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The relationship between the development of anthropological theory across the twentieth century and the emergence of “new social movements” organized around anti-colonialism, anti-racism, feminism, ethnicity, the environment, gender, sexuality, disability, and identity. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 422 Anthropological Approaches to Verbal Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A review of anthropological approaches to verbal performances in various cultures. Attention to narrative forms, including myth, folklore and oral history, and to ritual language, including oratory and prayer. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 208 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

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ANTHR 424 Visual Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to visual media and visualization in the creation, reproduction and comprehension of culture over time, and the use of imagery in describing the anthropological subject. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 437 Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). The impact of nationalism on language and culture in a variety of societies. Topics include development of national cultures and national languages; bilingualism and the creolization of language and culture; status of ethnic minorities; linguistic and cultural grounds for separatist movements; maintenance of transnational linkages in diaspora communities. Prerequisites: ANTHR 207, or 208 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 443 Juvenile Osteology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Study of the juvenile skeleton, treating development and identification of juvenile skeletal elements. Other topics include the theory and practice of determining juvenile age at death and the study of juvenile health and childrearing practices in past populations using skeletal remains. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 460 Nutritional Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Interrelationship between food, culture and biology from local and global perspectives. Prerequisite: ANTHR 372 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 464 Chemical Analysis of Bone Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Survey of current research on the stable isotope and aDNA analysis of archaeological human and faunal remains. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 471 Readings in Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Individual research project conducted under the direction of a Department faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of Department. ANTHR 472 Independent Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3). Individual research project involving significant laboratory work conducted under the direction of a Department faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of Department. ANTHR 474 Northwest Coast Societies from an Anthropological Perspective Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). A survey of the cultures of the Northwest Coast from Yakutat Bay to the Columbia River. Cultures will be examined from the perspectives of the ethnographic present, historical change, and current developments. Focal areas include social structure, kinship, economic systems, material culture, ethnoaesthetics, winter dance ceremonial complexes, and language. Prerequisite: ANTHR 207 or 250 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 476 Palaeodietary Reconstruction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Survey of methods used to reconstruct past human diets, with an emphasis on those that involve the study of human remains. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or 209 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 477 Northwest Coast Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). The examination of the long-term human occupation of the coastal areas from southeast Alaska to northern California. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 480 Zooarchaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Exploration of methodological and theoretical issues in zooarchaeology through the study of animal remains from archaeological contexts. Prerequisite: ANTHR 206 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 481 Development of Anthropological Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of approaches and practices used in archaeology; concepts and models used for interpreting archaeological data and cultural history; relation of culture historical explanations to general anthropological theory. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 and a 300- or 400-level anthropology course, or consent of Instructor. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 483 Topics in Biological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Consult the Department for the specific topics offered. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or consent of Department. ANTHR 484 Topics in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department for the specific topics offered and any recommended courses to be completed prior to registering. ANTHR 485 Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department for the specific topics offered and any recommended courses to be completed prior to registering. ANTHR 486 Seminar in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department for the specific topics offered and any recommended courses to be completed prior to registering.

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ANTHR 490 Human Osteoarchaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The analysis and interpretation of data obtained from human skeletal and dental remains from archaeological sites. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 491 Stone Tools Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A methodological and theoretical introduction to the analysis of stone tools. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 and one other 400-level course in Anthropology or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 494 Forensic Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Human skeletal individualization and its application to human death investigation. Prerequisite: ANTHR 390 or 490 or consent of Department. ANTHR 495 Archaeological Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The application of archaeological theory and methods to field and laboratory problems. Prerequisites: ANTHR 206 and one other 400-level course in Anthropology, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 498 History of Biological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of the development of theory and method in biological anthropology. Prerequisites: ANTHR 209 and a 300- or 400-level ANTHR, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 499 Honors Seminar and Research Project Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-3s-0). A review and discussion of contemporary issues in Anthropology leading to the conception, preparation, and completion of the BA Honors essay under the supervision of an individual faculty member. Note: Not open to students with credit in ANTHR 400 or 450.

Graduate Courses Note: All Department of Anthropology graduate courses are closed to web registration and require consent of Department. ANTHR 500 MA Thesis Prospectus Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Preparation of a research proposal leading to the MA thesis. The prospectus will state the proposed research problem, and demonstrate the theoretical and methodological knowledge required to complete the research. ANTHR 501 MA Colloquium Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Readings, presentations, and discussions of staff research, recent advances and current issues in the four fields of anthropology. Limited to new MA students ANTHR 504 Advanced Mortuary Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Theory and method applied to the interpretation of treatment of the dead in prehistoric and historic contexts. ANTHR 511 Ethnographic Field Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Not open to students with credit in ANTHR 401 or 505. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 517 Anthropology of Modernity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Investigates recent works that theorize modernity (globalization, transnationalism, the impact of new technologies) from an ethnographic perspective. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 520 Anthropology and the Twentieth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The relationship between the development of anthropological theory across the twentieth century and the emergence of “new social movements” organized around anti-colonialism, anti-racism, feminism, ethnicity, the environment, gender, sexuality, disability, and identity. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 521 Topics in Medical Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department and/or the University timetable for the specific topics offered. ANTHR 524 Visual Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to visual media and visualization in the creation, reproduction and comprehension of culture over time, and the use of imagery in describing the anthropological subject. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 537 Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). The impact of nationalism on language and culture in a variety of societies. Topics include development of national cultures and national languages; bilingualism and the creolization of language and culture; status of ethnic minorities; linguistic and cultural grounds for separatist movements; maintenance of transnational linkages in diaspora communities. Not open to students with credit in ANTHR 437. Offered in alternate years

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ANTHR 543 Advanced Juvenile Osteology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Study of the juvenile skeleton, treating development and identification of juvenile skeletal elements. Other topics include the theory and practice of determining juvenile age at death and the study of juvenile health and childrearing practices in past populations using skeletal remains. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 560 Advanced Nutritional Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Advanced seminar on the interrelationship between food, culture and biology from local and global perspectives. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 564 Advanced Chemical Analysis of Bone Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of current research on the stable isotope and aDNA analysis of archaeological human and faunal remains. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 571 Advanced Readings in Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Individual research project conducted under the direction of a Department faculty member. ANTHR 572 Independent Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3). Individual research project involving significant laboratory or field work conducted under the supervision of a Department faculty member. ANTHR 576 Advanced Palaeodietary Reconstruction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Advanced survey of methods used to reconstruct past human diets, with an emphasis on those that involve the study of human remains. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 577 Advanced Northwest Coast Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). The examination of the long-term human occupation of the coastal areas from southeast Alaska to northern California. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 580 Advanced Zooarchaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Exploration of methodological and theoretical issues in zooarchaeology through the study of animal remains from archaeological contexts. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 584 Advanced Topics in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department and/or the schedule of classes for the specific topics offered. ANTHR 585 Advanced Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department and/or the University timetable for the specific topics offered. ANTHR 586 Advanced Seminar in Archaeology and/or Biological Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department and/or the schedule of classes for the specific topics offered. ANTHR 587 Advanced Seminar in Social and Cultural Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department and/or the University timetable for the specific topics offered. ANTHR 589 Advanced Seminar in Linguistic Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department and/or the University timetable for the specific topics offered. ANTHR 591 Advanced Study of Stone Tools Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A methodological and theoretical introduction to the analysis of stone tools. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 593 Evolution and Social Life Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Current perspectives on human biological, social and cultural evolution. Offered in alternate years. ANTHR 598 Landscape and Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Cultural experiences and representations of landscape. ANTHR 600 PhD Thesis Prospectus Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Preparation of a research proposal leading to the PhD thesis. The prospectus states the proposed research problem, and demonstrates the theoretical and methodological knowledge required to complete the research. ANTHR 601 PhD Colloquium Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Readings, presentations, and discussions of staff research, recent advances and current issues in the four fields of anthropology. Limited to new PhD students. Optional for students with credit in ANTHR 501

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Arabic, ARAB Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies http://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

A Course Listings

ANTHR 487 Seminar in Social and Cultural Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Consult the Department for the specific topics offered and any recommended courses to be completed prior to registering.

529

University of Alberta

Course Listings A

530 Faculty of Arts

Notes (1) The Department reserves the right to place students in the language course appropriate to their level of language skill. (2) Placement tests may be administered in order to assess prior background. Students with an Arabic language background should consult a Department advisor. Such students may be granted advanced placement and directed to register in a more advanced course suitable to their level of ability. Students seeking to fulfill their Language Other than English requirement may begin at any one appropriate level, but must take the full Œ6 in one language. (3) The Department will withhold credit from students completing courses for which prior background is deemed to make them ineligible. For example, 100-level courses are normally restricted to students with little or no prior knowledge in that language. Should a student with matriculation standing, or those possessing prior background (such as native speakers or those for whom it is their first language) register in the 100-level course, credit may be withheld.

Undergraduate Courses O ARAB 111 Beginners’ Arabic I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). Introduction to pronunciation, reading, writing, and conversation. Note: not to be taken by students with native or near native proficiency, or Arabic 35 or its equivalents in Canada and other countries. Not open to students with credit in ARAB 100. O ARAB 112 Beginners’ Arabic II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). Continuation of ARAB 111. Prerequisite: ARAB 111 or consent of Department. Note: not to be taken by students with native or near native proficiency, or Arabic 35 or its equivalents in Canada and other countries. Not open to students with credit in ARAB 100. O ARAB 211 Intermediate Arabic I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Continuation of ARAB 112, emphasizing building an extensive vocabulary in everyday situations. Prerequisite: ARAB 112 or consent of Department. Note: not open to students with credit in ARAB 301 or 302. O ARAB 212 Intermediate Arabic II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Exercises in comprehension, translation and composition. Further study of grammar. Prerequisite: ARAB 211 or consent of Department. Note: not open to students with credit in ARAB 301 or 302. ARAB 499 Special Topics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department.

231.18

Art, ART Department of Art and Design Faculty of Arts

Note: Because presence at lectures and seminars, participation in classroom discussion, and the completion of assignments are important components of most courses, regular attendance is expected. This applies particularly to studio courses where attendance is a factor in grading. Students are expected to have successfully completed prerequisite course(s) with a minimum grade of B. Consent of Department may be withheld in cases where the grade in a prerequisite course is below a B. Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Design students in Art and Design have priority registration in all Art and Design studio courses. Registration in remaining spaces is based upon academic performance in required prerequisite courses.

Undergraduate Courses L ART 134 Art Fundamentals Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Studio-based exploration of both visual and conceptual Fine Art concerns in two- and three-dimensions. Note: ART 134 and DES 135 are required prerequisites for senior level ART or DES courses. Not open to students with credit in ART 131 or 132. ART 136 Art Fundamentals I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Studio-based exploration of both visual and conceptual Fine Art concerns in two- and three-dimensions. Note: Restricted to BFA and BDesign students. ART 137 Art Fundamentals II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Further study of studio-based exploration of both visual and conceptual Fine Art concerns in two- and three-dimensions. Note: Restricted to BFA and BDesign students. Prerequisite: ART 136. ART 140 Drawing I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to the principles and techniques of

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drawing. Pre- or corequisites: ART 134 and DES 135 or ART 136 and DES 138 and consent of Department. Not open to students with credit in ART 240. L ART 240 Drawing I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to the principles and techniques of drawing. Note: Restricted to BA and BEd Art and Design Majors. Prerequisites: ART 134 and DES 135 and consent of Department. Not open to students with credit in ART 140. L ART 310 Painting: Introductory Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to the principles, concepts, and techniques of painting. Projects based on observation with reference to both historical and contemporary examples. Acrylic medium. Prerequisites: ART 134 and DES 135 or ART 136 and DES 138 and consent of Department. L ART 311 Painting: Introductory Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Continued exploration of the principles, concepts and techniques of painting. Projects based on observation with reference to both historical and contemporary examples. Oil medium. Prerequisites: ART 310 and consent of Department. L ART 322 Printmaking: Introductory Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to the principles and technical applications of printmaking. Prerequisites: ART 134 and DES 135 or ART 136 and DES 138 and consent of Department. Normally ART 323 must be taken in the same academic year. L ART 323 Printmaking: Introductory Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Continued exploration of the principles and technical applications of printmaking with the introduction of new techniques. Prerequisites: ART 322 and consent of Department. Normally ART 322 must be taken in the same academic year. Not open to students with credit in ART 322 (Œ6) offered prior to 2012-13. L ART 337 Special Projects in Studio Disciplines: Introductory Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisites: ART 134 and DES 135 or ART 136 and DES 138 and consent of Department. ART 338 Special Projects in Studio Disciplines: Introductory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisites: ART 134 and DES 135 or ART 136 and DES 138 and consent of Department L ART 340 Drawing II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Development and application of techniques and concepts of drawing with emphasis on drawing from the life model. Prerequisite: ART 140 or ART 240 and consent of department. L ART 361 Sculpture: Introductory Studies in Abstract Sculpture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Foundation studies in abstract sculpture. Prerequisites: ART 134 and DES 135, or ART 136 and DES 138 and consent of Department. Corequisite: Normally ART 362, to be taken in the same academic year. L ART 362 Sculpture: Introductory Studies in Figurative Sculpture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Foundation studies in figurative sculpture. Prerequisites: ART 134 and DES 135, or ART 136 and DES 138, and consent of Department. Corequisite: Normally ART 361, to be taken in the same academic year. L ART 410 Painting: Intermediate Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). A project based course exploring principles, concepts and techniques of painting. Prerequisites: ART 310, 311 and consent of Department. L ART 411 Painting: Intermediate Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Further study of advanced principles, concepts and techniques of painting, leading to self-initiated projects. Prerequisites: ART 410 and consent of Department. L ART 418 Painting: Intermediate Figure Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Further study in painting the figure with emphasis on painting from the life model. Prerequisite or corequisite: ART 410 and consent of Department. L ART 419 Painting: Intermediate Figure Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Further study in painting the figure with emphasis on painting from the life model. Prerequisites: ART 418 and consent of Department. L ART 422 Printmaking: Intermediate Studies I Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Study of the principles and technical applications of printmaking with an emphasis on lithography and etching. Prerequisites: ART 322 and ART 323 and consent of Department. L ART 425 Word and Image: Intermediate Projects in Printmaking for Artists and Designers Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Exploration of the multiple relationships between word and image generated through consideration of text. Prerequisite: ART 322. Corequisite: ART 422. Note: ART 425 and DES 425 will be taught in conjunction.

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L ART 437 Special Projects in Studio Disciplines: Intermediate Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisite: consent of Department. ART 438 Special Projects in Studio Disciplines: Intermediate Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisite: consent of Department. L ART 439 Special Projects in Drawing: Intermediate Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisites: ART 340, or 339 and consent of Department. ART 440 Drawing: Intermediate Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Further study and application of the techniques and concepts of drawing. Prerequisite: ART 340 and consent of department.

ART 540 Drawing/Intermedia: Advanced Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Study of the principles and concepts of Drawing and Intermedia. Prerequisite: ART 440 and 441 and consent of department. ART 541 Drawing/Intermedia: Advanced Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Study of the principles and concepts of Drawing and Intermedia. Prerequisite: ART 540 and consent of department. L ART 565 Sculpture: Advanced Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Advanced studies in sculpture. Prerequisites: ART 465 and 466 and consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 562 (Œ6). L ART 566 Sculpture: Advanced Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Advanced studies in sculpture. Prerequisites: ART 565 and consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 562 (Œ6).

ART 441 Drawing: Intermediate Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Further study and application of the techniques and concepts of drawing. Prerequisite: ART 440 and consent of department.

L ART 567 Sculpture: Advanced Studies III Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Further advanced studies in sculpture. Pre or corequisites: ART 565 and 566 and/or consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 563 (Œ6).

L ART 465 Sculpture: Intermediate Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Intermediate studies in sculpture. Prerequisites: ART 361 and 362 and/or consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 462 (Œ6).

L ART 568 Sculpture: Advanced Studies IV Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Further advanced studies in sculpture. Pre or corequisites: ART 565 and 566 and/or consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 563 (Œ6).

L ART 466 Sculpture: Intermediate Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Intermediate studies in sculpture. Prerequisites: ART 465 and consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 462 (Œ6).

Graduate Courses

L ART 467 Sculpture: Intermediate Studies III Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Further intermediate studies in sculpture. Pre or corequisites: ART 465 and 466 and/or consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 463 (Œ6).

ART 613 Painting: Development of Concepts, Analysis, and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0).

L ART 468 Sculpture: Intermediate Studies IV Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Further intermediate studies in sculpture. Pre or corequisites: ART 465 and 466 and/or consent of the Department. Note: Not open to students with credit in ART 463 (Œ6). L ART 510 Painting: Advanced Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Individual directed study in a studio/workshop environment. Prerequisites: ART 411 and consent of Department.

ART 612 Painting: Concepts, Analysis, and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0).

ART 622 Printmaking: Concepts, Analysis, and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0). ART 623 Printmaking: Development of Concepts, Analysis and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0). ART 630 Seminar in Related Disciplines Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). ART 640 Drawing/Intermedia: Concepts, Analysis and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0).

L ART 511 Painting: Advanced Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Individual directed study in a studio/workshop environment. Prerequisites: ART 510 or 516 and/or consent of Department.

ART 641 Drawing/Intermedia: Development of Concepts, Analysis and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0).

L ART 516 Painting: Advanced Studies III Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Individual directed study in a studio/workshop environment. Prerequisites: ART 411 and consent of Department.

ART 662 Sculpture: Concepts, Analysis, and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0).

L ART 517 Painting: Advanced Studies IV Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Individual directed study in a studio/workshop environment. Prerequisites: ART 510 or 516 and/or consent of Department. L ART 522 Printmaking: Advanced Studies I Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Advanced study of the principles and technical applications of printmaking emphasizing mixed media and photographic techniques. Prerequisites: ART 422 and consent of Department. L ART 524 Printmaking: Advanced Studies III Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Advanced individual study of drawing and other image-making processes and their application in printmaking. Pre- or corequisites: ART 522 and consent of Department. L ART 525 Word and Image: Advanced Projects in Printmaking for Artists and Designers Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Exploration of the multiple relationships between word and image generated through consideration of text. Prerequisite: ART 422 and ART 425. Corequisite: ART 522. Note: ART 525 and DES 525 are taught in conjunction. Registration priority given to BDesign Printmaking Route students registering in DES 525. Not open to students who have successfully completed DES 525. L ART 537 Special Projects in Studio Disciplines: Advanced Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisite: consent of Department. ART 538 Special Projects in Studio Disciplines: Advanced Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisite: consent of Department. L ART 539 Special Projects in Drawing: Advanced Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-6L-0). Normally offered in Spring/Summer. Prerequisites: ART 439, or ART 440 and 441, and consent of Department.

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ART 663 Sculpture: Development of Concepts, Analysis, and Criticism Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-18L-0).

231.19

Art dramatique, ADRAM Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle O ADRAM 101 Introduction à l’art théâtral Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 2-0-2). Les origines et le développement de l’art théâtral, notions de base sur la production d’un spectacle de théâtre: de la conception à la réalisation. Analyses critiques de pièces auxquelles les étudiants assistent. O ADRAM 103 Les procédés dramatiques Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 2-0-2). Approche pratique et théorique au développement des ressources humaines par l’art dramatique. Introduction au jeu et à la forme théâtrale, avec insistance sur le processus de création, la stimulation des capacités de communiquer et de s’exprimer, l’imagination et la spontanéité. O ADRAM 201 Survol historique du théâtre universel Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Styles et formes du spectacle théâtral et leur relation changeante entre l’espace de jeu et le public, à partir du théâtre grec et romain jusqu’à nos jours. Oeuvres majeures, artistes et artisans du théâtre qui ont aidé au développement du langage théâtral tel que nous le connaissons aujourd’hui. Préalables: Œ3 en ADRAM ou l’équivalent. ADRAM 247 Communication orale Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 0-6L-0). Exercices pour améliorer la voie et la diction; exploration des techniques de base de la communication orale et interprétation de diverses formes littéraires; développement de l’expression spontanée du langage.

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A Course Listings

Registration priority given to BDesign Printmaking Route students registering in DES 425. Not open to students who have successfully completed DES 425.

531

University of Alberta

Course Listings A

532

O ADRAM 249 Créativité et jeu dramatique Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). La mise en évidence des possibilités créatrices du dialogue et de la nécessité de faire découvrir, par le jeu dramatique, le fond commun et permanent de la langue parlée et de la langue écrite. Pratique de la préparation et de la mise en marche des dramatisations, afin d’explorer la création des diverses formes dramatiques. Note : Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits en FRANC 249. ADRAM 284 Travail théâtral I Œ6 (fi 12) (aux deux semestres). Étude du jeu scénique, y compris l’analyse de textes et la création de personnages, dans le cadre d’une production théâtrale. Préalable: un des cours suivants - ADRAM 101, 103, 201 (ou l’équivalent). O ADRAM 302 Théâtres francophones du Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Perspectives contemporaines sur l’évolution du théâtre francophone au Canada. Étude des oeuvres qui ont marqué son histoire et des fonctions de la langue dans les répertoires dramatiques québécois et franco-canadiens. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour FRANC 302. Préalables: Œ3 de niveau 200 parmi FRANC, CAFR, ADRAM, ou l’équivalent. ADRAM 310 Lecture à voix haute Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Techniques de lecture à voix haute, exploration des ressources corporelles, vocales, musicales, visuelles et spatiales pour la lecture devant public. Survol historique de la lecture, interprétation de textes divers et procédés de mise en lecture publique. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant suivi FRANC 310. Préalables : Œ6 de niveau 200 parmi FRANC, CA FR, ADRAM ou l’équivalent.

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L ART H 103 Asian Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of art and visual culture in Asia. L ART H 202 Renaissance Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of visual art and culture in the 15th and 16th centuries. Not open to students with credit in ART H 252. L ART H 203 17th Century Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts and culture in the 17th century. Not open to students with credit in ART H 253. L ART H 205 18th and Early 19th Century Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts of the 18th and first half of the 19th century in Europe. L ART H 206 Early 20th-Century Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts up to World War II in Europe and North America. L ART H 208 American Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts in what is now the United States. L ART H 209 History of Design Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the development of design since the Industrial Revolution. L ART H 210 History of Photography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of photography from its invention in the 19th century to its impact in the 20th and 21st centuries.

ADRAM 350 Production vocale Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Exploration de la voix parlée et de la voix chantée. Éléments théoriques (physiologie et acoustique vocale) et pratiques (exercices d’élocution, exposé oral, lecture à voix haute, chant) de la production vocale. Le projet final prendra la forme d’une présentation orale pouvant inclure chant, poésie, lecture, exposé ou improvisation et mettra l’accent sur la production vocale. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant suivi MUSIQ 350. Préalables : Œ3 en MUSIQ X24, MUSIQ X40 ou ADRAM, ou l’équivalent avec approbation du professeur.

L ART H 211 Special Topics in the History of Art, Design and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Variable content course which may be repeated if topic(s) vary. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

O ADRAM 400 Choix de sujet Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Préalables : Œ3 de niveau 300 ou 400 parmi FRANC, CAFR, ADRAM ou l’équivalent.

L ART H 214 Art in China Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Cultural production of art and architecture in China from the imperial era (2500 BCE-1911) to the present.

ADRAM 403 Théâtres francophones contemporains Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Études d’oeuvres dramatiques et de mouvements esthétiques appartenant à divers répertoires francophones contemporains. Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits en FRANC 403 et ADRAM/FRANC 303 Préalables : 6Œ de niveau 300 parmi FRANC, CAFR, ADRAM, ETCAN 330 et 332 ou l’équivalent.

L ART H 215 Chinese Art Now Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Chinese cultural identity as expressed in global economies of art production and performance from the mid 20th century to the present.

O ADRAM 410 Traduction du théâtre et de la littérature au Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Initiation à la traduction théâtrale. Étude des répertoires traduits d’une langue officielle à l’autre au Canada. Préalables : Œ6 de niveau 300 ou 400 parmi FRANC, CAFR, LINGQ ou ADRAM, ou l’équivalent. Note : Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits en FRANC 410. ADRAM 484 Création Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Théorie et pratique du processus créatif dans l’écriture; introduction aux procédés discursifs de la poésie, du roman et de la pièce de théâtre. Préalable(s): FRANC 235 et Œ3 de littérature de niveau 300. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits en FRANC 484.

231.20

Art History, ART H Department of Art and Design Faculty of Arts

Note: Because presence at lectures and seminars, participation in classroom discussion, and the completion of assignments are important components of most courses, students serve their best interest by regular attendance. This particularly applies to seminars in the History of Art and Design, and Visual Culture where attendance is a factor in grading.

Undergraduate Courses L ART H 101 History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to Western Art, Design and Visual Culture to the end of the 14th century. L ART H 102 History of Art, Design and Visual Culture II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to Western Art, Design and Visual Culture from the 15th century to the present.

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L ART H 213 Latin American Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts in Latin America.

L ART H 226 Gender, Sexuality and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to key themes in feminist visual culture. L ART H 246 20th Century Art 1940-1975 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts from 1940 to 1975. L ART H 249 Visual Culture and Advertising Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The history of visual advertising practices from the late 19th century to the present. L ART H 255 Art from the Second Half of the 19th Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts of the second half of the 19th century in Europe. L ART H 256 Themes in Contemporary Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to key themes in contemporary art since 1970. Not open to students with credit in ART H 256 Œ3 offered prior to 2012-2013. L ART H 257 Canadian Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the visual arts in what is now Canada. L ART H 266 Popular Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the history and theory of popular culture, from the middle ages to the present day. L ART H 301 Geographies of Art, Design, and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The history of art, design and visual culture of a particular geographic location (e.g. nation, city, region, continent). Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 302 Vision and Visuality Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theories and practices of vision and visuality as they apply to the nature of perception, the relationship between looking, and the body and the politics of seeing. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-.

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L ART H 306 Modernism and Modernity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Aspects of the modern as it applies to the artistic practices of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 308 Art and Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intersections of art and religion across time and cultures. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-.

L ART H 412 Topics in Asian Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed one 300-level ART H course with a minimum grade of B. ART H 418 Special Subject, Fourth-Year Honors Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-3s-0). Preparation of the Honors essay, required in the fourth year of the Honors Program. L ART H 455 Topics in Art from the Second Half of the 19th Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed one 300-level ART H course with a minimum grade of B. L ART H 456 Topics in Art from the Mid-20th Century to the Present Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed one 300-level ART H course with a minimum grade of B.

L ART H 309 Design Theory and History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical and/or contemporary issues in design practice and theory. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-.

Graduate Courses

L ART H 311 Issues in the History of Art, Design and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Students are expected to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Variable content course which may be repeated if topic(s) vary. Sections may be offered in a Cost Recovery format at an increased rate of fee assessment; refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

L ART H 506 Advanced Studies in Art from the First Half of the 20th Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department.

L ART H 315 Chinese Urban Art and Design Now Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The historical and contemporary Chinese city-as representation, model, catalyst, and socio-political construct. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 326 Feminist Art: In Theory and Practice Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The impact of feminism on the visual arts and culture more broadly, since the 1970s. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 330 Art and Institutions Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The relationship between objects and their modes of interpretation, circulation and display (e.g. museums, academies, exhibitions, etc.) Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 336 Introduction to Performance Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to performance art of the 20th and 21st centuries. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 346 Introduction to Critical Theory in the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Foundation in some of the most influential theoretical traditions of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, including Marxism, psychoanalysis, semiotics, structuralism and poststructuralism, feminism, and postcolonial theory. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 366 Popular Culture, Then and Now Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Comparative theoretical and historical analyses of diverse forms of popular culture: for instance, fairs, spectacular displays of animals, advertising, and television. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-. L ART H 400 Historiography and Methodology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. L ART H 403 Topics in Early Modern Art and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed one 300-level ART H course with a minimum grade of B. L ART H 406 Topics in Art from the Beginning of the 20th Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed one 300-level ART H course with a minimum grade of B. L ART H 411 Special Topics in the History of Art, Design and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department.

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ART H 503 Advanced Studies in Early Modern Art and Visual Culture in Europe Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department.

L ART H 511 Special Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. L ART H 512 Topics in Asian Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Consent of Department. L ART H 555 Advanced Studies in Art from the Second Half of the 19th Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. L ART H 556 Advanced Studies in 20th Century and Contemporary Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. ART H 600 Historiography and Methodology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. ART H 611 Special Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. ART H 677 Graduate Research Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). This course is open to graduate students in History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture only.

231.21

Astronomy, ASTRO Department of Physics Faculty of Science

Undergraduate Courses O ASTRO 120 Astronomy of the Solar System Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The development of astronomy and astronomical techniques, including results obtained from the latest orbiting observatories. The origin, evolution and nature of the Earth, the other planets and non-planetary bodies will be discussed. Viewing experience will be available using the campus observatory. Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 and Physics 30. O ASTRO 122 Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The development of our understanding of the universe, including current models of stellar evolution and cosmology. Emphasis on understanding the physical processes underlying astronomical phenomena. Viewing experience will be available using the campus observatory. Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1 and Physics 30. O ASTRO 320 Stellar Astrophysics I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Application of physics to stellar formation and stellar evolution; theoretical models and observational comparisons of main sequence stars, white dwarf stars, neutron stars, supernovae, black holes; binary star systems, stellar atmospheres and stellar spectra. Prerequisites: MATH 115 or 118, and PHYS 126 or 146. Pre or corequisite: any 200-level PHYS course. SCI 100 may be used in lieu of MATH 115 and PHYS 126 or 146. Some additional knowledge of astronomy (ASTRO 120 and/or 122) is advantageous. O ASTRO 322 Galactic and Extragalactic Astrophysics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The interstellar medium and interstellar reddening; galactic structure; kinematics and dynamics of stars in galaxies; quasars; introduction of cosmology. Prerequisites: MATH 115 or 118, and PHYS 126 or 146, and PHYS 208 or 271. SCI 100 may be used in lieu of MATH 115 and PHYS

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A Course Listings

L ART H 304 Issues of Representation in Art, Design and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representation of gender, race, class and/or sexuality from both historical and theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Students are required to have successfully completed two 200-level ART H courses with a minimum grade of B-.

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126 or 146. Previous knowledge of astronomy is advantageous. ASTRO 320 is strongly recommended. O ASTRO 429 Upper Atmosphere and Space Physics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Basic space plasma phenomena: the Earth’s plasma and field environment; the solar cycle; generation of the solar wind; the interplanetary plasma and field environment; the solar-terrestrial interaction; magnetospheric substorms; the aurora borealis; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; effects of magnetospheric storms on man-made systems; use of natural electromagnetic fields for geophysical exploration. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 381. O ASTRO 430 Physical Cosmology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Observational cosmology; geometry and matter content of the Universe; physical processes in the early stages of the Universe; inflation, Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the cosmic microwave background radiation; cosmological aspects of galaxy formation and the growth of large-scale structure. Prerequisites: PHYS 310, MATH 334. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 458. O ASTRO 465 Stellar Astrophysics II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Stellar interiors and nuclear transformations; energy transport; model stars; variable stars; stellar evolution. Prerequisites: PHYS 310, 271, ASTRO 320, MATH 334.

231.22

Augustana Faculty - Accounting, AUACC Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUACC 311 Introductory Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Postulates, principles, the accounting cycle, capital and income measurement, financial statement preparation and analysis; emphasis on reporting to shareholders, creditors, and other external decision makers. Prerequisites: AUECO 101, 102, and basic familiarity with microcomputer applications. AUACC 322 Managerial Accounting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Designed to help managers assess needed information to carry out three essential functions in an organization: planning operations, controlling activities, and making decisions. The emphasis of this course is on cost behaviors, various product costing methods, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting and control through standard costs, and other quantitative techniques used by management. Prerequisite: AUACC 311.

231.23

Augustana Faculty - Art, AUART Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUART 101 Introduction to the History of Art I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the history of art from the Prehistoric Age to the end of the Middle Ages. AUART 102 Introduction to the History of Art II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the history of art from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. AUART 111 Studio Foundation I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Art-making is explored with basic techniques in drawing and color media. The visual language of perception and expression is introduced using principles of composition. Aesthetic and psychological principles of visual organization are applied to elements of line, shape, colour, and texture. AUART 112 Studio Foundation II - 3-D and Colour Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Further exploration of art-making in two and three dimensions. Visual structure is investigated expressively and technically in sculpture processes and paint media. Development of personal creativity and a basis for compositional analysis are included. Prerequisite: AUART 111, or Art 30 equivalence with consent of the instructor (based on portfolio submission). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUART 112 and 113. AUART 215 Sculpture I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to principles of composition and practice in 3-dimensional art. Historical and contemporary issues are explored. Prerequisite: Second year standing. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

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AUART 221 Nineteenth-Century Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Development of modern art in Europe during the nineteenth century with emphasis on major movements, concepts, and innovators. AUART 222 Art of the Twentieth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the practices and concepts of art during the twentieth century. Includes an introduction to a range of art and architecture, as well as a variety of critical and theoretical interpretations of art. Central focus is on the development of a modernist mainstream during this century and its relation to the ideas of post-modernism. AUART 223 Canadian Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the visual arts in Canada, from the indigenous beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the twentieth century. AUART 224 Art and Its Histories Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of works, movements, theories and institutions of art with an emphasis on contemporary art and recent approaches to the study and analysis of art works. It examines painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, graphic and applied art. AUART 228 Art Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Art studies. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in an Art degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Art that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be received for only one of AUART 228, AUHIS 285, AUPHI 228, AUREL 228. AUART 231 Drawing I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introductory course that develops basic skills of perception and recording as they apply to the practice of drawing. Historical and contemporary practices are explored primarily on the basis of direct observation of still life, landscape, and architecture. Issues in composition, expression, critical analysis, and technique using monochromatic media are included. Prerequisite: Second year standing, or Art 30, or consent of the instructor (based on portfolio submission). Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUART 232 Drawing II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Further exploration of drawing practice with the application of observational and conceptual skills to issues of expression and composition. Figure drawing, including anatomy, perceptual considerations, and the expressive potential of the human figure, is introduced. The use of colour media, the development of a personal aesthetic response, as well as critical analysis are included. Prerequisite: Second year standing. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar AUART 260 Selected Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in Art History possibly, but not necessarily, linked to a course that would later visit sites of art and visual culture. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUART 260 or AUCLA 193, 293. AUART 261 Selected Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in Art History possibly, but not necessarily, linked to a course that would later visit sites of art and visual culture. AUART 262 Selected Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in Art History possibly, but not necessarily, linked to a course that would later visit sites of art and visual culture. AUART 265 Selected Topics in Art History Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable in 3 weeks). Tour course following the selected topics course to which it is linked. The tour visits art sites discussed in that course. Prerequisite: The appropriate linked course from the AUART 260 - 264 series. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUART 265 or AUCLA 194, 294. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUART 266 Selected Topics in Art History Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable in 3 weeks). Tour course following the selected topics course to which it is linked. The tour visits art sites discussed in that course. Prerequisite: The appropriate linked course from the AUART 260 - 264 series. AUART 267 Selected Topics in Art History Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable in 3 weeks). Tour course following the selected topics course to which it is linked. The tour visits art sites discussed in that course. Prerequisite: The appropriate linked course from the AUART 260 - 264 series. AUART 271 Painting I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Painting from the ground up. The course introduces painting technique and colour usage in acrylic and/or oil media. Perceptual and conceptual problems are based on historical and contemporary practices

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University of Alberta

AUART 272 Painting II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Further exploration of painting practice using oil and acrylic painting techniques. Critical analysis is included. Varieties of conceptual contexts and individual expressive directions are investigated. Prerequisite: AUART 271 or consent of the instructor (based on portfolio submission). Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUART 287 Topics in Late Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Consideration of various topics in seventeenth and eighteenth century European art. Its focus is on the study of themes, ideas and methodologies pertaining to the visual culture of the period, rather than a chronological survey. AUART 289 Studies in Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in the history of visual culture that are organized thematically rather than by period, nationality or style. Prerequisite: Second-year standing. AUART 298 Selected Topics in Art Studio Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Selected topics in art studio practice that are theme or media based. Prerequisite: Second year standing. Notes: AUART 298 does not count towards any major or minor in Art. AUART 299 Selected Topics in Art Studio Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Selected topics in art studio practice that are theme or media specific. Prerequisite: Second year standing. Notes: AUART 299 does not count towards any major or minor in Art. AUART 331 Drawing III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Intermediate drawing further develops techniques and concepts of drawing with a focus on contemporary practices leading to selfinitiated projects. Prerequisite: AUART 231. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUART 365 Aesthetics and Visual Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Considerations of theoretical issues related to visual arts, broadly understood B painting, television, video, film, advertising, and photography. Classical theories of nature of the visual experience, as well as modern and postmodern theories and critiques. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUART 365 and AUPHI 365. AUART 366 Representations of Place and Space Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigation of concepts and representations in art, architecture, literature and philosophy, of place and space from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite: None, but a course in Art history, Philosophy, Geography, or Canadian literature would be helpful. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUART 366 and AUPHI 366. AUART 371 Painting III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Intermediate painting further develops techniques and concepts of painting with a focus on contemporary practices leading to selfinitiated projects. Prerequisite: AUART 272. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUART 380 Directed Reading in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Individual study project for the advanced art history student. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUART 381 Selected Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in art history and visual culture. Prerequisite: Any 200-level Art history course or consent of the instructor. AUART 382 Selected Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in art history and visual culture. Prerequisite: Any 200-level Art history course or consent of the instructor. AUART 383 Selected Topics in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in art history and visual culture. Prerequisite: Any 200-level Art history course or consent of the instructor. AUART 411 Visual Explorations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6s-0). Advanced studies in a studio discipline with individualized programs designed in collaboration with the instructor. Direction is guided by issues in contemporary practice and thought. Prerequisites: AUART 331 and one of 215, 371. AUART 480 Directed Reading in Art History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Individual study project for the highly advanced art

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history student. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUART 490 Directed Project in Visual Explorations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1L-0). Individual study course for the highly advanced studio art student. A selected theme in two- or three-dimensional expression is explored intensively. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

231.24

Augustana Faculty - Biology, AUBIO Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUBIO 108 Introduction to Marine Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2). Introduction to the diversity of marine ecosystems and the adaptations of marine organisms to their environment. Notes: The course does not count toward the major, concentration, or minor in Biology. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program. AUBIO 110 Evolution of Biological Diversity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-3L/2-3/2). Examination of the evolutionary mechanisms and history that have produced the earth’s biodiversity. Prerequisite: Biology 30. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUBIO 130 Cell Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-3L/2-3/2). Study of the ultrastructure and function of plant and animal cells. Topics include membrane models, cytoplasmic organelles, the cell cycle, and nucleocytoplasmic interactions. Dynamic processes at the cellular level, such as cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and motility, and function of plant, animal, and prokaryote cells, are also examined. Prerequisites: Biology 30 or AUBIO 093, and Chemistry 30. AUBIO 210 Biological Science and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the biological sciences. Prerequisite: Second- year standing in a Biology or Environmental degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Biology that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 210, AUCHE 210, AUENV 210 and AUGEO 210. AUBIO 222 Plant Diversity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Comparative survey of the morphology, life cycles, and evolutionary features of algae, fungi, and non-vascular and vascular plants. Taxonomic and environmental considerations are also presented. Prerequisite: AUBIO 110. AUBIO 230 Molecular Cell Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The composition, structure and function of cell membranes including membrane transport, cell signalling and cell-cell interactions. Protein sorting and cytoskeletal function is integrated with their membrane interactions. The social context of cells is also considered. Prerequisite: AUBIO 130. Corequisite: AUCHE 250. AUBIO 253 Principles of Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Study of the interactions between organisms and their environment in the context of populations, communities, ecosystems, and biomes. Prerequisite: AUBIO 110. AUBIO 260 Principles of Genetics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Mendelian inheritance and its cytological features including the molecular and cellular basis for the transmission of hereditary characteristics. Topics that are emphasized include microbial genetics, cytoplasmic inheritance, linkage and genetic mapping, DNA as genetic material, gene action, and the genetic code. Prerequisite: AUBIO 130. AUBIO 274 Microbiology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic members of the microbial world. Microbiological diversity will be examined by comparing cellular morphology, structure and metabolism. Topics include how to grow and study microbes, classification approaches and problems, control of microbial growth, microbial ecology and industrial applications of microorganisms and their products. Prerequisite: AUBIO 130. AUBIO 294 Survey of the Invertebrates Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Functional anatomy and life cycles of the major invertebrate taxa. Prerequisite: AUBIO 110. AUBIO 295 The Vertebrates Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Study of the structure, function, and diversity of vertebrates. Prerequisite: AUBIO 110.

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with an emphasis on personal creativity. Critical analysis of art is a component. Prerequisites: Second year standing. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

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AUBIO 318 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised library research project. Prerequisites: Third-year standing, Œ6 in Biology at the 200 level. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUBIO 319 Directed Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Supervised laboratory or field research project. Prerequisites: Third-year standing, Œ6 in Biology at the 200 level. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUBIO 320 Plant Autecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of plant species’ population dynamics; interrelationships with biotic and abiotic components of the environment and ecophysiological adaptations. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. AUBIO 321 Plant Synecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Study of plant communities and their formation, maintenance, distribution, and interaction with the abiotic environment. Consideration is also given to plant succession, fire ecology, and global vegetation patterns. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. AUBIO 322 Economic Botany Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Biological properties, geographical distribution, applications/utilization, and history of vascular and nonvascular plants economically important in agriculture, industry, and medicine. Prerequisites: AUBIO 110 and Œ6 of 200-level AUBIO. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 322 and AUENV 322. AUBIO 326 Drug Plants Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of historical and current use of important drug-producing plants. Evaluation of the chemistry and physiology of biologically active compounds from poisonous, analgesic, and hallucinogenic plants, and the current uses of such plant products. Use of plant biotechnology to develop drug-producing plants. Prerequisite: 200-level Biology course. AUBIO 336 Histology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Systematic and sequential consideration of fundamental cytology, the normal histology of the basic tissues, and the embryological development and microscopic organization of the major mammalian organs and organ systems. Emphasis is placed on the light- and electron-microscopic features of cells and tissues with direct correlation of structure and function. Prerequisites: AUBIO 230 and 295. AUBIO 338 Developmental Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Development of complex organisms. Emphasis is on the interactions between cells and their environment that determine cell survival, gene activation and deactivation; and how specific cell and tissue structures and functions are selected. Developmental processes common to plants and animals are identified. Prerequisites: AUBIO 230 and 260; one of AUBIO 222, 294 and 295: and third year standing. AUBIO 341 Entomology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Examination of the world of insects from the point of view of major areas of entomological study including life histories, taxonomy, phylogeny, physiology, development, morphology, and behaviour. Emphasis is given to the study of insects as animals, not as pests. Prerequisite: AUBIO 294. AUBIO 343 Insect Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Relationships of insects to their environment, including the roles of insects in energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, and ecological succession. Evolutionary relationships also receive attention. Prerequisites: AUBIO 253 and 294. AUBIO 350 Conservation Theory and Biodiversity in Tropical Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1). Introduction to the basic concepts of conservation biology. The scope of conservation biology and levels of biodiversity are explored, as are aspects of tropical ecology related to conservation. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, 294, or 295, and consent of the instructor(s) based on successful completion of the selection process. Note: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUBIO 459 or AUENV 459. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 350, 450, AUENV 350, 450. AUBIO 351 Biogeography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Analysis of the spatial patterns of biotic systems and species. The course examines their past and present distribution patterns in the context of biological and ecological processes and human impacts. The course employs several methods of analysis, including geographic information systems. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 351 and AUGEO 351. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUBIO 354 Freshwater Ecology and Management Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Introduction to the biological, chemical and physical

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features of freshwater ecosystems, and how they relate to ecological processes in and adjacent to aquatic systems. The course will examine the role of ecological patterns in lakes, ponds, rivers and streams, with an emphasis on freshwater systems and their management in western Canada. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 354, AUENV 354, and AUGEO 354. The course requires participation in a field trip. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUBIO 371 Immunology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An introduction to the structure and function of the immune system. Topics will include the generation of B and T cell receptor diversity, antigens and antibodies, clonal selection and expansion, MHC restriction, self tolerance, cytokines and leukocyte trafficking. Discussion of infectious disease, vaccines, and immunity will be used to synthesize these topics into a unified conceptual framework. Prerequisites: AUBIO 230 and 260. AUBIO 380 Biochemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). The structure and function of proteins and enzymes and the structure, function, and metabolism of carbohydrates. The structure and function of lipids, nucleic acids, and amino acids are introduced. The course focuses on how enzymes catalyze the oxidation of carbohydrates and how the cell conserves this energy in a useful chemical form. Prerequisite: AUCHE 252. Corequisite: AUBIO 230. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 380 and AUCHE 380. AUBIO 381 Biochemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Structure, function, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids at the level of the cell and organs. Prerequisites: AUBIO 380 or AUCHE 380. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 381 and AUCHE 381. AUBIO 389 Molecular Biology of the Gene Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of current knowledge and approaches in the area of structure, expression, and regulation of prokaryote and eukaryote genes. Topics include gene isolation and characterization, gene structure and replication, and transcription and translation processes and their regulation. Recombinant DNA technology and its applications are also introduced. Prerequisite: AUBIO 260. AUBIO 390 Animal Behaviour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to key concepts and methods in animal behaviour. Both mechanistic and evolutionary points of view are considered. The student’s understanding of scientific thinking is deepened. Topics include instinct, learning, orientation, communication, mating and territoriality, foraging, and social behaviour. Prerequisite: AUBIO 294 or 295. AUBIO 397 Vertebrate Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Review of the general concepts in animal physiology with an emphasis on structure and function and their adaptive significance to the animal in its environment. Physical, chemical, and functional aspects of animal cells and cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, osmoregulatory, endocrine, and nervous systems are considered. Bioelectric and contractility phenomena are also included. Prerequisites: AUBIO 230 and 295. AUBIO 411 History and Theory of Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Overview of historical progression in the biological sciences and their associated development in relation to prevailing philosophical, social, and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: AUBIO 260; one of AUBIO 222, 274, 294, 295; Œ6 of Biology at the 300 level; fourth-year standing. AUBIO 338 is strongly recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 411 and AUBIO 311. AUBIO 412 Selected Topics in Biological Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth study of an advanced topic in Biology. Prerequisites: Vary according to topic; third-year standing. AUBIO 413 Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth study of evolutionary processes in natural populations of plants and animals. Selected topics for lectures and seminars address contemporary questions about natural selection, adaptation, speciation, biogeography and the evolution of interaction among species. Prerequisites: AUBIO 253 and Œ3 of AUBIO at the 300 level or a cross-listed AUENV or AUGEO equivalent. AUBIO 418 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised library research project. Prerequisites: Third-year standing, Œ6 in Biology at the 200 level. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUBIO 419 Directed Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Supervised laboratory or field research project. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUBIO 423 Directed Reading in Plant Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised and directed readings for developing

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AUBIO 438 Evolutionary Development Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Comparative study of the developmental processes of different organisms in an attempt to determine their ancestral relationships and how developmental processes evolved. Topics include the origin and evolution of embryonic development; how modifications of development and developmental processes lead to the production of novel features; the role of developmental plasticity in evolution; the origin of biodiversity; and the developmental basis of homology. Prerequisites: AUBIO 338 or 389. AUBIO 448 Directed Reading in Entomology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Investigation of advanced topics in entomology. Prerequisite: AUBIO 341 or 343. Notes: Admission to AUBIO 448 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUBIO 459 Field Studies in Tropical Ecology and Conservation Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0 in 2 weeks). Field course that addresses problems of biodiversity and conservation in tropical environments. The student participates in field workshops, and designs and conducts his or her own field project to answer questions related to ecological and biological conservation. Prerequisite: AUBIO 350 or AUENV 350, and consent of the instructors based on successful completion of the selection process. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 459 and AUENV 459. Students who have received credit for AUBIO 359 or AUENV 359 may enrol in AUBIO 459 or AUENV 459 in a subsequent year based on successful completion of the selection process. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUBIO 475 Pathogenic Mechanisms of Microorganisms Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Examination of the pathogenic mechanisms used by bacteria, fungi, and protists that cause human diseases. Pathogens will be compared with a focus on the method of entry, colonization and invasion of host tissue used by various microbes and the microbial factors required to cause infection and disease. Epidemiological approaches, antimicrobials and antibiotic resistance will also be presented. Prerequisites: AUBIO 260, 274, 371. AUBIO 485 Selected Topics in Biochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of biochemistry. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing in the Biology program; AUBIO 381 or AUCHE 381; and an additional Œ3 of AUBIO at the 300-level. Note: Credit may only be obtained for one of AUBIO 485 and AUCHE 485. AUBIO 489 Directed Reading in Lipid Biochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Biochemistry of lipids, lipoproteins, and membranes. The course extends and deepens material covered in AUBIO 381 by examining some of the theories, experiments, and methods used to investigate lipid biochemistry. Prerequisite: AUBIO 381. Notes: It is strongly recommended that AUBIO 389 precede AUBIO 489. Admission to AUBIO 489 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 489 and AUCHE 489.

231.25

Augustana Faculty - Chemistry, AUCHE Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUCHE 110 General Chemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1.5l/2-3/2). A general introduction to chemistry. Topics include atomic structure; bonding and bonding theories; periodic trends; states of matter and intermolecular forces; and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 30 and Mathematics 30-1.

AUCHE 220 Analytical Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Theoretical and practical aspects of chemical analysis. Topics include gravimetry, titrimetry, separations, acid-base equilibria, chromatography, and spectrophotometry. Examples emphasize the utility and limitations of analytical techniques. Prerequisite: AUCHE 112. Recommended corequisite: AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. AUCHE 222 Instrumental Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Study of the theory and practice of instrumental methods of analysis. Topics include atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy, fluorometry, liquid and gas chromatography, physical separations, and electrochemical methods. Examples include the analysis of chemicals with environmental importance. Prerequisite: AUCHE 220. Recommended corequisite: AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. AUCHE 230 Inorganic Chemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Electronic structure of atoms, bonding and molecular structure, ionic bonding, symmetry and point groups, introduction to spectroscopy; infrared and Raman spectroscopy, uv-visible spectroscopy; chemistry of hydrogen, boron hydrides, cyclic boron-nitrogen, phosphorus-nitrogen, and sulfur-nitrogen compounds. Prerequisite: AUCHE 112. AUCHE 232 Inorganic Chemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Theory and applications of organometallic chemistry, metal carbonyls, metal nitrosyls, dinitrogen complexes, transition metal organometallic compounds, synergic bonding, organometallic catalysts, fluxional molecules; descriptive chemistry of the s- and p-block elements; fullerenes. Prerequisite: AUCHE 230. AUCHE 250 Organic Chemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). An introduction to bonding and functionality in organic compounds. Mechanistic approach to solving problems will be emphasized, with discussion of the reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides. The three-dimensional structure of molecules and the concept of stereochemistry will be examined. Infrared spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy will be applied in both the lecture and the lab. Prerequisite: AUCHE 110; AUCHE 112 is recommended. AUCHE 252 Organic Chemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Continuation of AUCHE 250, again emphasizing a mechanist approach. The chemistry of alcohols, conjugated unsaturated systems, aromatic rings, carbonyl-containing compounds, organic reduction-oxidation reactions, and beta-dicarbonyl compounds will be discussed. Carbohydrate chemistry will be introduced as a way to explore many concepts in a biochemical context. Prerequisite: AUCHE 250. AUCHE 277 Introduction to Relativity and Quantum Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special relativity; photons and matter waves; Bohr atom model; Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle; Schrödinger equation; one-dimensional systems; hydrogen atom; spin; Pauli Exclusion Principle; manyelectron atoms; molecules. Prerequisites: AUCHE 112, AUMAT 112, and AUPHY 120. Corequisite: AUMAT 211 is recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 277, AUPHY 260. AUCHE 279 Physical Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Study of the principles and concepts of physical chemistry. Topics include the laws of thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, phase, equilibria, surface chemistry, chemical kinetics and catalysis and spectroscopy and photochemistry. Prerequisites: AUCHE 112 and AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. AUCHE 305 Selected Topics in Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of selected topics in Chemistry. Prerequisites: Œ6 in Chemistry at the 200 level, Œ3 of which must be in the subject area of the particular selected topics course. AUCHE 320 Analytical Chemistry III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory and application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Prerequisite: AUCHE 222. AUCHE 322 Topics in Analytical Electrochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The study of electrochemistry and electroanalytical techniques. Prerequisite: AUCHE 222.

AUCHE 112 General Chemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1.5l/2-3/2). Continuation of AUCHE 110. Topics include thermodynamics, free energy, equilibria, acid-base chemistry, buffers, oxidationreduction reactions, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisite: AUCHE 110.

AUCHE 330 Transition Metal Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Ligand field theory, molecular orbital theory, stereochemistry, magnetochemistry, applications of nuclear magnetic resonance to transition metal complexes, isomerism, reaction mechanisms, electronic spectra and ligand field calculations, descriptive chemistry, transition metals in biological systems, the lanthanides and actinides. Prerequisite: AUCHE 230.

AUCHE 210 Chemistry Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in chemistry. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Chemistry degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Chemistry that requires library research. Notes: The corequisites must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 210, AUBIO 210, AUENV 210, AUGEO 210.

AUCHE 350 Organic Chemistry III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Continuation of the foundation laid in AUCHE 250 and 252, considering in greater depth and breadth various familiar topics (e.g., reactions of carbonyl compounds), and exploring reactions (e.g., free-radical, enantioselective, green chemistry) and techniques (e.g., use of protecting groups) and investigating classes of compounds (e.g., heterocycles) barely touched upon

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written assignments in a specific subject area of plant ecology. The course may serve as a base for a complementary independent laboratory studies course. Prerequisite: AUBIO 320 or 321. Notes: Admission to AUBIO 423 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

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previously. The laboratory work illustrates and expands upon lecture material, and provides practice in spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Prerequisite: AUCHE 252. AUCHE 377 Quantum Chemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of AUCHE 277. Prerequisites: AUMAT 211; one of AUCHE 277, AUPHY 260. Corequisites: AUPHY 310 and AUMAT 330 are recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 377 and AUPHY 360. AUCHE 380 Biochemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). The structure and function of proteins and enzymes and the structure, function, and metabolism of carbohydrates. The structure and function of lipids, nucleic acids, and amino acids are introduced. The course focuses on how enzymes catalyze the oxidation of carbohydrates and how the cell conserves this energy in a useful chemical form. Prerequisite: AUCHE 252. Corequisite: AUBIO 230. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 380 and AUBIO 380. AUCHE 381 Biochemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Structure, function, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids at the level of cells and organs. Prerequisites: AUBIO 380 or AUCHE 380. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 381 and AUBIO 381. AUCHE 390 Senior Project I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-6). A research project on a specific topic in chemistry to be determined jointly by the student and professor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 390 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCHE 392 Senior Project II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-6). A research project on a specific topic in chemistry to be determined jointly by the student and professor. Prerequisite: AUCHE 390. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 392 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCHE 397 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised literature research project. Prerequisite: Third-year standing. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 397 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCHE 399 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised literature research project. Prerequisite: AUCHE 397. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 399 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCHE 405 Selected Topics in Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of selected topics in Chemistry. Prerequisites: Œ12 of senior Chemistry, at least Œ3 of which must be in the subject area of the particular selected topics course. AUCHE 455 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of selected topics in Organic Chemistry. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing in Chemistry program and Œ6 of Chemistry at the 300 level, Œ3 of which must be in Organic Chemistry. AUCHE 485 Selected Topics in Biochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of selected topics in Biochemistry. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing in Chemistry program; Œ3 AUCHE 381 or AUBIO 381; and an additional Œ3 of AUCHE at the 300-level. Note: Credit may only be obtained for one of AUBIO 485 and AUCHE 485. AUCHE 489 Directed Reading in Lipid Biochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Biochemistry of lipids, lipoproteins, and membranes. The course extends and deepens material covered in AUCHE 381 by examining some of the theories, experiments, and methods used to investigate lipid biochemistry. Prerequisite: AUCHE 381. It is strongly recommended that AUBIO 389 precede AUCHE 489. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 489 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 489 and AUBIO 489. AUCHE 490 Advanced Project I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-6). A research project on a specific topic in chemistry to be determined jointly by the student and professor. Prerequisite: AUCHE 390. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 490 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCHE 492 Advanced Project II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-6). A research project on a specific topic in chemistry to be determined jointly by the student and professor. Prerequisite: AUCHE 390. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 492 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in

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Chemistry. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCHE 497 Directed Reading III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Chemistry as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 497 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An `Application for Individual Study’ must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCHE 499 Directed Reading IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Chemistry as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing and AUCHE 497. Notes: Admission to AUCHE 499 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Chemistry. An ‘Application for Individual Study’ must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

231.26

Augustana Faculty - Classical Studies, AUCLA Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUCLA 100 Greek Civilization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of the major contributions of the Greeks to Western civilization in art, architecture, education, literature, philosophy, and politics. AUCLA 102 Greek and Roman Mythology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of classical mythology based on readings in translation from ancient literature. Study of the influence of classical mythology on art, film, literature, and music. AUCLA 193 Selected Topics in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected topics in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 193, 293 or AUART 260. AUCLA 194 Selecting Topics in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, 3 weeks). Three-week study tour of ancient Greek and/ or Roman sites. Prerequisite: AUCLA 193, 293 or AUART 260. Note: Tour costs are the responsibility of the student. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 194, 294 or AUART 265. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUCLA 221 History of Ancient Greece I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of Greece from the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 221 and AUHIS 203. AUCLA 222 History of Ancient Greece II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of Greece from the Persian Wars to the end of the Hellenistic Age. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 222 and AUHIS 204. AUCLA 223 History of the Roman Republic Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the Roman Republic from its beginnings to the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 223 and AUHIS 207. AUCLA 224 History of the Roman Empire Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the Roman Empire from the time of Augustus to the fall of the west in the fifth century A.D. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 224 and AUHIS 208. AUCLA 242 Greek and Roman Epic in Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of Greek and Roman epic poetry in English translation, including works of Homer, Hesiod, Apollonius of Rhodes, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucan. AUCLA 243 Greek and Roman Tragedy in Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of Greek and Roman tragedy in English translation, including works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca. AUCLA 244 Greek and Roman Comedy in Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of Greek and Roman comedy in English translation, including works of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence. AUCLA 291 Greek Art and Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of Greek art, architecture, and archaeology from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Age.

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AUCLA 293 Selected Topics in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected topics in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 193, 293 or AUART 260. AUCLA 294 Selected Topics in Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (spring/summer, 3 weeks). Three-week study tour of ancient Greek and/ or Roman sites. Prerequisite: AUCLA 193, 293 or AUART 260. Note: Tour costs are the responsibility of the student. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 194, 294 or AUART 265. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUCLA 301 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Classics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUCLA 302 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Classics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUCLA 303 Directed Reading III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Classics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUCLA 304 Directed Reading IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Classics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUCLA 305 Directed Reading V Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Classics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUCLA 310 Ancient Greek Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of ancient Greek philosophy from its origins with the Pre-Socratics up to and including Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisites: AUPHI 101 and 102 preferred, but not necessary. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCLA 310 and AUPHI 311. AUCLA 361 Women in Greece and Rome Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the Greek and Roman attitudes toward women as reflected in art, literature, law, and religion.

231.27

Augustana Faculty - Community Service Learning, AUCSL Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUCSL 100 An Introduction to Community Engagement Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An interdisciplinary introduction to community and civic engagement for students interested in preparing the groundwork for undertaking further experiential educational opportunities (e.g., Internships, Study Abroad, CSL). AUCSL 300 Theory and Practice of Community Service-Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An in-depth exploration of theories and practices of civic engagement and community change for students who have already completed a course with a CSL component and who wish to extend their volunteer experience. Prerequisite: Completion of a course with a CSL component and consent of instructor. Note: For information about Augustana CSL, consult the Learning and Beyond office. For courses in programs and departments that offer a CSL component, see the link on the Augustana Faculty website www. augustana.ualberta.ca/csl.

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AUCSL 350 Selected Topics in Community Service-Learning Œ1-6 (variable) (variable). Content varies from year to year. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Corequisite: variable. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUCSL 360 Community Service-Learning Practicum Œ1-6 (variable) (variable, variable). Content varies from year to year but will include a significant service component. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Corequisite: variable. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUCSL 480 Directed Study in Community Service-Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Individual study opportunity on topics for which no specific course is currently offered. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor based on completion of a CSL placement (a record of courses and students can be found in the Learning and Beyond office).

231.28

Augustana Faculty - Computing Science, AUCSC Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUCSC 110 Introduction to Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1.5). Historical overview of the development of modern computers; computer applications and the social implications of information technology; the user interface and system design principles; introduction to programming and the software life cycle; overview of programming languages and introduction to program translation; gates, circuits, and Boolean logic; the architecture of a von Neumann machine; Turing machines and the theory of computation; artificial intelligence; computers and society. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. AUCSC 111 Introduction to Computational Thinking and Problem Solving Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An introduction to computational thinking, problem solving, and the fundamental ideas of computing science through programming in a scripting language (such as Python or Ruby). Topics include algorithms, abstraction, and modelling; the syntax and semantics of a high-level language; fundamental programming concepts and data structures, including simple containers (arrays, lists, strings, dictionaries); basic software development methods and tools; documentation and style; introduction to object-oriented programming; exceptions and error handling; graphical user interfaces and event-driven programming; recursion; introduction to algorithm analysis and run-time efficiency. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCSC 111 and AUCSC 120. AUCSC 112 Data Structures and Algorithms Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An introduction to object-oriented design and programming in Java; algorithm analysis; data structures and container classes (lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, trees, maps, dictionaries, search trees, sets), their implementations (arrays, linked lists, binary trees, heaps, binary trees, balanced search trees, hash tables, skip lists), and associated algorithms (insertion, removal, iterators, traversal, searching, sorting, selection, retrieval); analysis and comparison of sorting algorithms. Prerequisite: AUCSC 111 or 120. Corequisite: AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116 and 120. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCSC 112 and AUCSC 210. AUCSC 120 Abstraction, Design, and Object-Oriented Programming Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to programming, problem solving, and designing large software systems using an object-oriented programming language (typically Java); objects, classes, methods, messages, parameters, inheritance, encapsulation, binding, polymorphism; algorithmic constructs; basic data structures; overview of software engineering. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1 Corequisites: AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116, and 120. AUCSC 210 Algorithm Analysis and Data Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1.5). Introduction to algorithm analysis and Onotation. Abstract data types (lists, stacks, queues, trees, priority queues, dictionaries, sets), their implementations (linked lists, binary trees, heaps, binary search trees, balanced search trees, hash tables), and associated algorithms (iterators, enumerators, traversal, sorting, searching, retrieval). Prerequisites: AUCSC 120, AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116, and AUMAT 120. Corequisite: AUMAT 250. AUCSC 220 Software Engineering I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1.5). Software engineering paradigms, requirements specification, iterative software development, object-oriented design patterns,

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AUCLA 292 Classics Tour (Greece) Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, 3 weeks). Three-week study tour on selected topics in the archaeology, art, and architecture of ancient Greece. Prerequisite: AUCLA 291 or consent of the instructor. Note: Tour costs are the responsibility of the student.

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visual modelling with UML, software architecture; testing, verification and maintenance; software development environments and software engineering tools; societal implications such as the cost of failure and professional responsibilities. Prerequisite: AUCSC 112 or 210. AUCSC 250 Computer Organization and Architecture I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1.5). Introduction to computer systems as multilevel machines. Topics include data representation; the organization and execution cycle of Von Neumann machines; assembly-level programming, addressing modes, control flow, procedure calls, input/output, interrupts, caching; finite state machines, Boolean algebra, logic gates, and digital circuits. Prerequisite: AUCSC 112 or 120. AUCSC 310 Algorithm Design and Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-1.5). Introduction to graph theory; data structures for the representation of graphs, digraphs, and networks, and their associated algorithms (traversal, connected components, topological sorting, minimum-spanning trees, shortest paths, transitive closure). Dynamic equivalence relations and union-find sets; amortized analysis. String  matching. Algorithm design techniques (divideand-conquer, dynamic programming, the greedy method). NP-completeness. Prerequisites: AUCSC 112 or 210 and AUMAT 250. AUCSC 320 Software Engineering II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-4.5L-0). Detailed study of software development processes, life cycles, and tools, especially object-oriented methods. Team work is emphasized in the completion of a large software project, from problem definition through to maintenance. Prerequisite: AUCSC 220. AUCSC 330 Database Management Systems I Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-1.5). Introduction to current database management systems in theory and practice. Topics include relational database design (including entity-relationship modelling, relational schema, and normal forms); relational algebra, use of a query language (typically SQL) and other components of a current database management system; overview of database system architecture, file structures (including B-tree indices), query processing, and transaction management; new directions. Prerequisites: AUCSC 112 or 210, and AUMAT 250. AUCSC 340 Numerical Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Computer arithmetic and errors, solution of systems of linear equations, root finding, interpolation, numerical quadrature, and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations. Applications from physics are included. Prerequisites: AUMAT 120, Corequisite: AUMAT 211; or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCSC 340, AUMAT 340, AUPHY 340. AUCSC 350 Computer Organization and Architecture II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-1.5). Architecture of historical and contemporary computer systems, including CPU chips and buses, memory, secondary memory devices, and I/O interfaces. Performance enhancement techniques, including prefetching, pipelining, caching, branch prediction, out-of-order and speculative execution, explicit parallelism, and predication are discussed. The course also includes the data path and control logic at the microarchitecture level; error detection and correction; floating-point number representation and calculation; fast arithmetic circuits; instruction sets and formats; and an overview of alternative and parallel architectures, including RISC/CISC, SIMD/MIMD, shared memory and message passing architectures. Prerequisite: AUCSC 250. AUCSC 355 Networks and Security Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Introduction to computer communication networks and network security. Physical and architectural elements and information layers of a communication network, including communication protocols, network elements, switching and routing, local area networks, and wireless networks. Authentication, cryptography, firewalls, intrusion detection, and communication security, including wireless security. Prerequisite: AUCSC 250. Corequisite: AUCSC 380 AUCSC 370 Programming Languages Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1.5). Principles of language design, abstraction, syntax and parsing, operational semantics (declaration, allocation, evaluation, run-time environment, typing, activation), and programming language paradigms (procedural, object-oriented, functional, logic programming). Prerequisites: AUCSC 112 or 210, and AUMAT 250. Corequisite: AUCSC 250. AUCSC 380 Operating Systems Concepts Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-1.5). Operating system functions, concurrent process coordination, scheduling and deadlocks, memory manage­ment and virtual memory, secondary storage management and file systems, protection. Prerequisites: AUCSC 250. AUCSC 395 Directed Study I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Intensive study of a specific area of Computing Science as defined by the student and a supervising instructor, including completion of a software project in the selected area. Prerequisite: Œ9 of senior-level Computing Science. Notes: Admission to AUCSC 395 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Computing Science. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

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AUCSC 398 Selected Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a selected topic in computing science. The focus and content of each course offering are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: At least third-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in Computing Science as determined by the instructor. AUCSC 399 Selected Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Advanced study of a selected topic in computing science. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Third-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in Computing Science as determined by the instructor. AUCSC 401 Professional Practicum I Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, variable). A four-month work experience placement focused on gaining practical experience in software development and/or information systems, and an appreciation of the demands and responsibilities of the computing profession. Upon completion of the work experience term, the student must submit a report to the Department which summarizes, evaluates, and reflects on the work performed and the knowledge and experience gained during the placement. Prerequisites: At least Œ18 in Computing Science, third-year standing, and consent of the Department. Note: Participation in the practicum is by application only, and is restricted to Computing Science majors. AUCSC 402 Professional Practicum II Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, variable). A four-month work experience placement focused on gaining practical experience in software development and/or information systems, and an appreciation of the demands and responsibilities of the computing profession. Upon completion of the work experience term, the student must submit a report to the Department which summarizes, evaluates, and reflects on the work performed and the knowledge and experience gained during the placement. Prerequisites: AUCSC 401 and consent of the Department. Note: Participation in the practicum is by application only, and is restricted to Computing Science majors. AUCSC 415 Automata, Algorithms and Complexity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Models of computers, including finite automata and Turing machines, basics of formal languages, compatibility, algorithm optimality, complexity classes (p, NP, NPcomplete, EXP, PSPACE, etc.), probabilistic algorithms, approximation algorithms, number-theoretic and other selected algorithms. Prerequisites: AUCSC 310. Notes: This course may not be taken for credit if credit has previously been received for AUCSC 315, 410, or AUMAT 355. AUCSC 450 Parallel and Distributed Computing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Parallel architectures, programming language constructs for parallel computing, parallel algorithms and complexity. Messagepassing, remote procedure call, and shared-memory models. Synchronization and data coherence. Load balancing and scheduling. Appropriate applications. Prerequisites: AUCSC 350. AUCSC 460 Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Survey of concepts and applications of artificial intelligence, including knowledge representation, state-space search, heuristic search, expert systems and shells, natural language processing, propositional logic, learning and cognitive models, vision; implementation using an AI language (LISP or PROLOG). Prerequisites: AUCSC 370 and AUMAT 250. AUCSC 490 Social and Ethical Issues for Computing Professionals Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical and social context of computing; the social and ethical responsibilities of the computing professional; the risks and liabilities that can accompany a computing application; intellectual property. The course includes extensive writing assignments and oral presentations. Prerequisite: At least Œ18 in Computing Science, including AUCSC 220 or 330; at least thirdyear standing. AUCSC 495 Directed Study II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Intensive study of a specific area of Computing Science as defined by the student and a supervising instructor, including completion of a software project in the selected area. Prerequisite: Œ9 in Computing Science at the 300 level. Notes: Admission to AUCSC 495 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Computing Science. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUCSC 498 Selected Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a selected topic in computing science. The focus and content of each course offering are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: At least third-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in Computing Science as determined by the instructor. AUCSC 499 Selected Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Advanced study of a selected topic in computing science. The focus and content of each course offering are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: At least third-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in Computing Science as determined by the instructor

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University of Alberta

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Augustana Faculty - Crime and Community, AUCRI Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUCRI 160 Introduction to Crime, Correction, and Community Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to crime and correction in Canada. The theory and practice accompanying law enforcement, trial, correctional intervention, and probation and parole are analyzed by drawing from a range of disciplinary traditions such as ethical reflection, psychological theory, social and political thought, and biological understandings of criminality. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 160 and AUIDS 160. AUCRI 200 Young Offenders and the Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Integrative examination of theories of delinquency, the relationship of the young offender to Canadian criminal law, family, drug abuse, child abuse, and recent developments in community-based treatment programs. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 200 and AUSOC 200. AUCRI 222 Canadian Social Issues Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to sociological perspectives on social problems. Various theoretical orientations are applied to contemporary Canadian social issues such as poverty, gender issues, aboriginal rights, human sexuality, and regionalism. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 222 and AUSOC 222. AUCRI 224 Studies in Deviant Behaviour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Interactionist analysis of processes accompanying the definition of deviance, subculture formation, careers of involvement in deviant activities, and the formal and informal regulation of deviance. Prerequisite: One of AUCRI 160, AUIDS 160, AUSOC 101, 103, 105. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 224 and AUSOC 224. AUCRI 225 Criminology: A Canadian Perspective Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of anthropological and sociological explanations of crime and criminality, including a cross-cultural analysis of the social processes accompanying criminal activities. The course focuses on criminality as defined under Canadian criminal law and the traditional legal systems of Canada’s aboriginal peoples. Prerequisite: One of AUCRI 160, AUIDS 160, AUSOC 101, 103, 105. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 225 and AUSOC 225. AUCRI 260 Crime and Community Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research and skills in the discipline of Crime and Community. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in an IDS-Crime and Community degree program. Corequisite: Second-year standing in Crime and Community. Any senior course in Crime and Community that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 260, AUPOL 201, AUSOC 231. AUCRI 327 Crimes of the Powerful Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Why is it that so much attention is paid to “street crime” while the crimes of the powerful go virtually unpunished and sometimes unnoticed? A comprehensive examination of the prevalence and impact of crime committed by the powerful, including white collar occupational crime, corporate crimes, and crimes committed by the state. Prerequisite: One of AUCRI 160, 224, 225, 353, AUIDS 160, AUPOL 353, AUSOC 224, 225. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 327, 427, AUSOC 327, 427. AUCRI 353 Law, Politics, and the Judicial Process Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the Canadian judicial branch of government in comparative perspective. The course probes court structures; judicial independence, appointment, discipline, and removal; judicial decision making processes; and courts and the public policy process. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, 221, AUCRI 160, AUIDS 160. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 353 and AUPOL 353. AUCRI 422 The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the Canadian Charter and its effect on Canadian politics and government. The course traces the development of Charter jurisprudence and examines the Charter’s effect on federalism, public policy (including criminal law), and political culture. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, 221, AUCRI 160, AUIDS 160. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 422 and AUPOL 422. AUCRI 427 Crimes of the Powerful Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Why is it that so much attention is paid to “street crime” while the crimes of the powerful go virtually unpunished and sometimes unnoticed? A comprehensive examination of the prevalence and impact of crime committed by the powerful, including white collar occupational crime, corporate crimes, and crimes committed by the state. Prerequisite: One of AUCRI 160, 224,

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225, 353, AUIDS 160, AUPOL 353, AUSOC 224, 225. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 327, 427, AUSOC 327, 427. AUCRI 453 Women and the Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course explores historical and contemporary relationships between women and the Canadian legal system. The course uses feminist legal theory to explore the evolution of areas of Canadian law of particular interest to women (for example: reproduction, abortion, family law, rape laws, criminal law) and political activism around the law and women’s issues. Prerequisites: One of AUCRI 353, AUPOL 353, 355 or AUIDS 230. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 453 and AUPOL 453. AUCRI 488 Law and Forensic Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the psychology of criminal behaviour and the legal system. Topics covered include theories of criminal behaviour, jury selection and decision-making, police interrogations and confessions, eyewitness testimony, and risk assessment and offender intervention programs. Prerequisite: AUPSY 240. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 488 and AUPSY 488.

231.30

Augustana Faculty - Drama, AUDRA Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUDRA 101 Play Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey and critical analysis of dramatic literature from ancient Greek to contemporary. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUDRA 109 Script Analysis and Production Preparation Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Script analysis and production preparation for the Drama Department’s major production. Note: Students should take this course at the year level that coincides with the year level at which they are registered in the subsequent production (AUDRA 139). AUDRA 123 Introduction to Oral Communication Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study in speech and rhetoric for effective oral communication and interpretation. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUDRA 138 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. AUDRA 139 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Note: Distinct from AUDRA 138 in that it is a separate production with a different director. AUDRA 144 Improvisation I: Introduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Speech and movement improvisation with an emphasis on imaginative development; introduction to the process of acting and to dramatic form. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 141 (2013) and AUDRA 144. AUDRA 148 Community Theatre Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-4L-0). Two-credit course offered over the full year, including participation in all scheduled performances. Participation in the course is determined by audition - being cast in a significant role in the chosen production. Prerequisite: Consent of the Division. Note: An “Application for Community Theatre Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUDRA 201 History and Critical Analysis of Theatre Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of crucial works, genres, and styles, within the history of Western theatre along with the critical analysis of contemporary theatrical presentations. Prerequisite: AUDRA 101. AUDRA 209 Script Analysis and Production Preparation Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Script analysis and production preparation for the Drama Department’s major production. Note: Students should take this course at the year level that coincides with the year level at which they are registered in the subsequent production (AUDRA 239). AUDRA 220 Introduction to Voice and Speech for Actors Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to the workings of the human voice and its application to spoken texts.

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A Course Listings

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Course Listings A

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University of Alberta

AUDRA 228 Drama Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Drama. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Drama degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Drama that requires library research. Notes: The corequisites must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 228, AUENG 204, AUFRE 210, AUGER 210, AUSCA 210. AUDRA 230 Acting Techniques I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to scene study with an emphasis on character and text analysis. Prerequisites: AUDRA 141, or Drama 30, or consent of the instructor (based on an audition). AUDRA 233 Clown and Mask Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Exploration and experimentation in impulse inspired performance using mask, improvisation and clowning techniques. Prerequisite: AUDRA 141 or consent of instructor. Note: Formerly AUDRA 433 with the following prerequisite: AUDRA 230 or 244. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUDRA 238 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 141, and consent of the instructor based on audition. AUDRA 239 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 141, and consent of the instructor based on audition. Note: Distinct from AUDRA 238 in that it is a separate production with a different director. AUDRA 244 Improvisation II: Workshop and Performance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Intensive study in the work of Viola Spolin and Paul Sills, with an emphasis on Improvisational Performance and Collective Creation. Prerequisites: AUDRA 141 (2013) or 144. AUDRA 248 Community Theatre Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-4L-0). Two-credit course offered over the full year, including participation in all scheduled performances. Participation in the course is determined by audition - being cast in a significant role in the chosen production. Prerequisite: Consent of the Division. Note: An “Application for Community Theatre Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUDRA 275 Theatre Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Instruction and practical experience in stage management, publicity and promotion, fundraising, front of house and lighting and sound operation in a repertory theatre setting. Prerequisite: Second-year standing. AUDRA 301 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Drama to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended for a student with a major in Drama. AUDRA 309 Script Analysis and Production Preparation Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Script analysis and production preparation for the Drama Department’s major production. Note: Students should take this course at the year level that coincides with the year level at which they are registered in the subsequent production (AUDRA 339). AUDRA 310 Modern Canadian Drama Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of Canadian Drama designed to familiarize students with the dramatic literature and theatrical practices of a representative group of twentieth century Canadian playwrights. Prerequisite: AUDRA 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 310 and AUENG 385. AUDRA 312 Shakespeare Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-2L-0). Selected works of Shakespeare. Prerequisites: AUDRA 201. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 312, AUENG 233, 333. AUDRA 320 Performer-Created Theatre Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Exploration, practice, and experimentation inperformer-created theatre. Prerequisite: AUDRA 230. AUDRA 338 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 238 or 239, and consent of the instructor based on audition. AUDRA 339 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 238 or 239, and consent of the instructor based

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on audition. Note: Distinct from AUDRA 338 in that it is a separate production with a different director. AUDRA 340 Movement for the Theatre Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Exploration of movement for the performer; study and development toward an awareness of the physical body in space; and study in expression and personal movement patterns. Prerequisite: AUDRA 141 or 230 or consent of the instructor. AUDRA 344 Improvisation III: Applied Improvisation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Exploration into interactive and improvisational drama as applied to education, therapy, business, recreation, community-building, and personal, group and social empowerment. Prerequisites: AUDRA 141 (2013) or AUDRA 144 and third year standing, or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 344 and either of AUDRA 345 or 346. AUDRA 348 Community Theatre Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-4L-0). Two-credit course offered over the full year, including participation in all scheduled performances. Participation in the course is determined by audition - being cast in a significant role in the chosen production. Prerequisite: Consent of the Division. Note: An “Application for Community Theatre Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUDRA 350 Introduction to Directing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Fundamentals of directing explored through practical exercises. Prerequisites: AUDRA 141 and consent of the instructor. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUDRA 360 Dramaturgy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Role of the dramaturge, in theory and practice, in professional and amateur theatre. Offers a bridge between the academic (theoretical and historical) and the practical (communicating to an audience) aspects of the discipline. Prerequisite: AUDRA 101 or 201 or consent of the instructor. AUDRA 367 Critical Discourse and the Fine Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to Theory and the Fine Arts. A critical study of historical and contemporary issues in the fine arts with an emphasis on themes common to the disciplines of drama, music and the visual arts as cultural processes. Discussions of various theoretical positions including critical and cultural theory, aesthetic theory, disciplinary history and a history of criticism. Prerequisite: Third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 367, 467, AUART 367, 467, AUMUS 367,467. AUDRA 384 Playwriting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Study of the theory of, and practice in, writing for the stage. Prerequisites: AUDRA 230, or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 384 and AUENG 319. AUDRA 391 Intermediate Production Lab Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Production experience in stage management and/or technical theatre under the supervision of the production director and contracted experts. Prerequisites: One of AUDRA 138, 139, 238, 239, 338, 339 and consent of the Department. AUDRA 395 Canadian Theatre Festivals Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Includes 1 week tour. Examination of the significance of two festivals to Canadian theatre history and exploration of the impact of G. B. Shaw and William Shakespeare on Western theatre. This course analyses texts from the current year’s festivals and includes a week-long tour to Canada’s two major theatre festivals The Shaw Festival at Niagara-on-the-Lake and the Stratford Festival at Stratford. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUDRA 396 Selected Topics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to the theory, history, and practice of performance on stage or in secondary visual media. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. AUDRA 397 Selected Topics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to the theory, history, and practice of performance on stage or in secondary visual media. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. AUDRA 398 Selected Topics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to the theory, history, and practice of performance on stage or in secondary visual media. Prerequisite: AUDRA 101. AUDRA 399 Selected Topics in Drama Performance Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to the practice of performance on stage or in secondary media. Prerequisite: Second year standing. AUDRA 401 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of concentration

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AUDRA 409 Script Analysis and Production Preparation Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Script analysis and production preparation for the Drama Department’s major production. Note: Students should take this course at the year level that coincides with the year level at which they are registered in the subsequent production (AUDRA 439). AUDRA 430 Movement and Physical Theatre Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to the use of abstract and improvisational movement with a view to creating physical performance pieces. Prerequisite: AUDRA 320 or 340. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUDRA 431 Acting for the Camera Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Introduction to the basics of acting for both television and film style productions. Emphasis is placed on truthful acting within the medium of the camera. The course will include live tapings of auditions (including selected scenes and monologues), and cold readings for sitcoms and television dramas. Prerequisites: AUDRA 230 and 244. AUDRA 437 Senior Showcase Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). Research, rehearsal, production and performance of a play chosen specifically for a senior level acting ensemble. Priority given to fourth year students. Prerequisites: AUDRA 230 and 238 or 239. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUDRA 438 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 338 or 339, and consent of the instructor based on audition. AUDRA 439 Theatre Company Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Involves an extensive research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 338 or 339, and consent of the instructor based on audition. Note: Distinct from AUDRA 438 in that it is a separate production with a different director. AUDRA 444 Improvisation IV: Story Theater Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). The course will focus on creating a spontaneous performance by applying Spolin/Sills based improvisation to a newly scripted play in the Story Theater style. Prerequisite: AUDRA 244. AUDRA 448 Community Theatre Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-4L-0). Two-credit course offered over the full year, including participation in all scheduled performances. Participation in the course is determined by audition - being cast in a significant role in the chosen production. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: An “Application for Community Theatre Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUDRA 467 Critical Discourse and the Fine Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to Theory and the Fine Arts. A critical study of historical and contemporary issues in the fine arts with an emphasis on themes common to the disciplines of drama, music and the visual arts as cultural processes. Introduction to Theory and the Fine Arts. A critical study of historical and contemporary issues in the fine arts with an emphasis on themes common to the disciplines of drama, music and the visual arts as cultural processes. Discussions of various theoretical positions including critical and cultural theory, aesthetic theory, disciplinary history and a history of criticism. Prerequisite: Thirdyear standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUDRA 367, 467, AUART 367, 467, AUMUS 367, 467. AUDRA 509 Script Analysis and Production Preparation Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Script analysis and production preparation for the Drama Department’s major production. Note: Students should take this course at the year level that coincides with the year level at which they are registered in the subsequent production (AUDRA 539). AUDRA 538 Theatre Production Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Includes a research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 438 and consent of the instructor based on audition. AUDRA 539 Theatre Production Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-6L-0). Ensemble production of improvisational or scripted plays. Includes a research component appropriate to the chosen production. Prerequisites: AUDRA 439 and consent of the instructor based on audition.

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231.31

Augustana Faculty - Economics, AUECO Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUECO 101 Introduction to Microeconomics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economic analysis, problems, and policies, with emphasis on the Canadian economy; roles of consumers and firms in competitive and monopolistic markets; foreign ownership in the Canadian economy; distribution of income, inequality, and poverty; use of the environment; government economic policies. AUECO 102 Introduction to Macroeconomics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economic analysis, problems, and policies, with emphasis on the Canadian economy; national income and monetary theory; problems of unemployment and inflation; government monetary and fiscal policies; international trade theory, problems, and government policies. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. AUECO 203 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory of consumer behaviour; theory of production and cost; price and output determination under competition, monopoly, and other market structures. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. AUECO 204 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). National income concepts and income determination; theories of aggregate consumption, investment, and employment behaviour; monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: AUECO 102. AUECO 206 Mathematics in Economics and Finance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Mathematical analysis of problems arising in economics and finance, including an introduction to economic modelling; simple, compound, and continuous rates of interest; static and comparative-static analysis; optimization; annuities, mortgages, bonds, and other securities; dynamics. Prerequisites: AUECO 101 and one of AUMAT 110, 111 or 116. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 206, AUMGT 206, AUMAT 235. AUECO 212 Economics Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Economics. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in an Economics degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Economics that requires library research. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 212, AUMGT 212. The corequisite must be taken concurrently. AUECO 215 Economic Thought Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the history of economic thought, focusing on the major schools of thought from classical political economy to post-war neoclassicism. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. AUECO 220 Thinking Strategically Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to game theory and strategic thinking in economics, business, and related disciplines. Prerequisites: Pure Mathematics 30 or Mathematics 30-1 and AUECO 101. AUECO 251 History of Canadian Economic Development Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of Canada’s economic development from before Confederation until the present. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 251 and AUHIS 262. AUECO 252 India Tour Orientation Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Examination of the intersection between religion and development in India. Students research and present on a particular topic relevant to the intersection of religion and development, as well as participate in team building exercises. Issues such as health and safety, travel preparations, dealing with culture shock, and the regional geography of India will be covered. Prerequisite: One of AUREL 100, 283, AUECO 101, consent of the instructor. Notes: This is a prerequisite course for the India Tour (AUECO 254 or AUREL 266). Costs associated with the India Tour (3-weeks) and applicable tuition are the responsibility of the student. Enrolment is limited to 15 students. This course can only be taken by students who also register in AUECO 254 or AUREL 266. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 252 or AUREL 260. AUECO 254 India Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). Three-week study tour of India that focuses on a chosen region of India in order to examine the intersection between religious belief and practice and development challenges. Students will be exposed to various development projects as well as an array of religious sites. It is expected that students will gain an in depth understanding of India, its cultural and religious diversity, and the challenges it faces in the 21st century. Students will be exposed to both rural and urban life. Prerequisite: AUECO 252 or AUREL 260. Notes: Costs associated with this India Tour course and applicable tuition are the responsibility

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for highly advanced students to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: AUDRA 301. Notes: An application for Individual Study must be completed and approved before registration in the course. Must have fourth year standing and receive Department Chair approval.

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of the students. Enrolment is limited to 15 students. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 254 and AUREL 266.

the Augustana Campus. Prerequisites: At least 3 credits in AUECO, AUHIS, AUPOL or consent of the instructor. Corequisites: AUECO 362 or AUHIS 334.

AUECO 257 The International Economy in Historical Perspective I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economic analysis of modern economic growth focusing on the Industrial Revolution and its consequences. Critical thinking about why the Industrial Revolution and its related economic growth models can and/ or cannot be generalized worldwide is also encouraged.

AUECO 362 Estonia Study Tour Œ2 (fi 4) (Spring/Summer, 2 weeks). A two-week study trip to Estonia, in the course of which students will be able to take part in the International Summer Programme offered by the University of Tartu and classes led by Augustana instructors. The programme includes lectures in a number of disciplines, as well as visits to historical sites and business in Estonia and in the neighbouring Baltic countries and Finland. Students will gain a better understanding of the history and economic development of the region. Prerequisites: At least 3 senior credits in AUECO, AUHIS, AUPOL or consent of the instructor; one of AUECO 361 or AUHIS 327; and successful completion of a selection process.

AUECO 258 The International Economy in Historical Perspective II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economic analysis of the international economy during the past century. Topics examined include the disintegration of national and international economies after World War I, the Great Depression, and the fate of national and international economies after World War II. Critical thinking about whether international economic integration has promoted worldwide economic growth and stability is also encouraged. AUECO 264 Globalization and Growth Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Study of globalization and its role in economic development from a historical perspective. This course will examine the pros and cons of globalization, reasons countries trade, the distributional consequences of trade, and the role of multinational and international organizations. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. AUECO 311 Introductory Econometrics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to the application of econometric methods in economics and business. The focus is on major topics in econometrics with emphasis on applied regression methods. Prerequisites: AUSTA 153 and AUECO 203. AUECO 323 Industrial Organization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration of various patterns of internal organization in industries, focusing on the relations among the structure, conduct, and performance of the industries. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 323 and AUMGT 323. AUECO 333 Money and Banking in Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the role of money and of monetary institutions and policy in the framework of Canadian financial institutions. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and 102. AUECO 336 Economics of Financial Markets Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of economic approaches to financial market activity: the meaning and measurement of risk, portfolio investment choices and market equilibrium, theory of interest and the term structure of interest rates, inter-temporal and macro-policy issues, and debt management. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 336 and AUECO 436. AUECO 341 Environmental Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relationships between the economy and the environment. Emphasis is placed on the application of economic analysis to various environmental issues. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 341 and AUENV 341. AUECO 346 Agricultural Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of economic theory and policy relating to the agricultural sector of the economy. Emphasis is placed on the economic aspects of agricultural production, marketing, finance, and resource use with particular reference to agricultural policy in Canada and Alberta. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. AUECO 354 Economic Development and Institutional Change in China Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A survey of China’s growth and economic development in the pre reform and post reform periods, exploring ideology, institutional structures, and state planning, and analyzing the impact of globalization on China’s business and political practices. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and one of AUPOL 103 or AUPOL 104; or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 354 and AUPOL 358. AUECO 356 China Tour: Experiencing Development and Change Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). A three week study trip to China, including travel to educational institutions in Zhuhai, the Zhuhai Special Economic Zone and other locations depending on the year. Through lectures, tours and research taking place in China, this course explores the effects of economic and institutional reforms as well as those of globalization, with links to China’s history and to its culture. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 356 and AUPOL 356. AUECO 360 International Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the theories of international trade and investment, the international monetary system, and the multinational firm. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. AUECO 361 Estonia Study Tour Preparation and Orientation Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 1-0-0). This course provides the necessary preparation for the Estonia Study Tour course (AUECO 362 or AUHIS 334). The course is taught as an online module-based course with some scheduled face-to-face meetings on

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AUECO 363 International Finance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the types of international transactions, exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, macroeconomics in an open economy, and other issues in the international monetary system. Prerequisite: AUECO 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 363 and AUECO 463. AUECO 364 Development Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the major approaches to and problems of economic development in the less-developed nations. Particular emphasis is placed on issues relating to capital accumulation, income distribution, population growth and employment, and international economic relations. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. AUECO 380 Selected Topics in Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers selected topics in Economics. Topics may vary from year to year depending on the instructor and student interest. Prerequisites: AUECO 101 and 102. Notes: Minimum third year standing. AUECO 381 Selected Topics in Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers selected topics in Economics. Topics may vary from year to year depending on the instructor and student interest. Prerequisites: AUECO 101 and 102. Notes: Minimum third year standing. AUECO 384 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Designed for majors in Economics, dealing with extensions and applications of microeconomic theory: topics include intertemporal choice, risk, uncertainty and expected utility; oligopoly and game theory; externalities, public goods, adverse selection, moral hazard, and asymmetric information; general equilibrium. Prerequisites: AUECO 203 and AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. AUECO 385 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Designed for majors in Economics. Theories of stabilization policy; expectations; the government budget constraint; inflation and unemployment; business cycles and growth; theories of aggregate consumption, investment, money demand and money supply. Prerequisites: AUECO 203, 204 and AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. AUECO 393 Public Sector Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of the use of resources for public purposes by all levels of government, emphasizing the rationale for public expenditures, taxation structures, and public choice mechanisms. Prerequisite: AUECO 102. AUECO 397 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics. AUECO 398 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUECO 397 or 497, and consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics. AUECO 422 Industrial Organization and Policy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of oligopoly theory, the economics of mergers and takeovers, competition policy, and industry regulation. Prerequisites: AUECO 203 and AUECO/AUMGT 323. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 422, AUMGT 422. AUECO 436 Economics of Financial Markets Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of economic approaches to financial market activity: the meaning and measurement of risk, portfolio investment choices and market equilibrium, theory of interest and the term structure of interest rates, inter-temporal and macro-policy issues, and debt management. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 336 and AUECO 436. AUECO 449 Economic Methods of Project Evaluation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of investment projects using various

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AUECO 463 International Finance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the types of international transactions, exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, macroeconomics in an open economy, and other issues in the international monetary system. Prerequisite: AUECO 102. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 363 and AUECO 463. AUECO 465 International Trade Policy and Applications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of various trade models. The application of economic tools to international trade policy; tariffs, quotas, export subsidies, and application of game theory to international trade. Prerequisite: AUECO 203. Note: AUECO 360 is highly recommended. AUECO 480 Ethics in Economics and Business Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigation of the relation between ethical reflection and the activities of businesses and economics. Attention is paid to the role of self-interest and rationality in economic and business discourse, the relation between the price system and human values, and the morality of the market as a means of social organization. Several case studies are used. Prerequisite: At least Œ6 at a senior-level in Economics or Management. AUECO 497 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics. AUECO 498 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of economics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUECO 397 or 497, and consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in economics.

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Augustana Faculty - Education Field Experience, AUEFX Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUEFX 200 Introduction to the Profession of Teaching Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-4). Orientation to teaching. For the laboratory component of the course, a student spends half a day per week assisting in a local elementary or secondary school. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUEFX 200 and 201. AUEFX 201 Orientation to Teaching Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-6). Introductory education course with a field experience component for a student intending to teach at the elementary or secondary level. The field experience component consists of two three-hour or three twohour blocks of time per week assisting in a local school classroom. Notes: The course is designed for a student intending to apply for admission to the Faculty of Education at the University of Lethbridge, which requires a field experience component of at least 60 hours. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUEFX 201 and 200.

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Augustana Faculty - Educational Computing, AUEDC Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUEDC 202 Technology Tools for Teaching and Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Exploration, at both the introductory and more advanced levels, of the most common information technology tools currently used in schools, including tools for internet access, digital media processing, multimedia/hypermedia presentations, spreadsheets, and databases. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills, preferably within a MS Windows environment, including word processing, e-mail, and use of a web browser.

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231.34

Augustana Faculty - Educational Psychology, AUEPS Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUEPS 258 Educational Psychology for Teaching Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Introduction to the fundamental concepts and issues in educational psychology. The focus is on the child from preschool to adolescence through examination of learning and instruction, individual differences, motivation, assessment, and classroom management. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102.

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Augustana Faculty - English, AUENG Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUENG 103 English Literature from the Romantic Period to the Present Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of works of literature in English from the major literary periods and principal genres from the Romantic period up to the present. British, United States, and Canadian literatures are represented. Prerequisite: ELA 30-1. AUENG 104 English Literature from the Middle Ages to the Romantic Period Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of works of literature in English from the major literary periods and principal genres from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: AUENG 103. AUENG 202 Women’s Writing and Feminist Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Several contemporary feminist theological approaches will be used to analyze religious and devotional writings by women from various historical periods and areas of the English-speaking world. Texts in the areas of scripture, systematic theology, ethics, and feminist theory and spirituality will be analyzed to understand the importance of feminist theological practice in dialogue with the Judeo-Christian tradition and women’s struggles for justice and wellbeing. Literary texts will include fiction, poetry, essays and personal narrative by authors such as Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Alice Sebold, Emily Dickinson, Adrienne Rich, and Louise Glück. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 302. AUENG 204 English and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of English. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in an English degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in English that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 204, AUFRE 210, AUDRA 228, AUGER 210 and AUSCA 210. AUENG 205 Children’s Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Offers a critical study of literature written for or appropriated by children. The course considers the historical development of children’s literature and examines prevailing and changing attitudes toward children. It addresses major themes and issues in children’s literature, and studies significant texts representative of important genres and trends in the field. Critical analysis of the literature will be stressed. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 305. AUENG 207 Aboriginal/Indigenous Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Offers a critical study of literature by First Peoples, including narratives from the oral tradition, fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and personal narratives. Themes will include traditional and contemporary perspectives on gender, cultural and political identity, and spirituality. Multiple critical approaches (aesthetic, linguistic, political, historical, and cultural) will be employed in examining this literature, including selections from Native critical texts. Content, period, and national focus will vary. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 307. AUENG 208 African Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of African literature in English from a variety of genres. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 308. AUENG 211 The History of the English Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the historical development of the English language from its Indo-European roots to its present-day forms, including Canadian English. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Formerly part of AUENG 213. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 213, 311 or 313.

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economic methods. Topics include the use of cost-benefit analysis, impact analysis, and methods to examine the relations among economic activity, the environment, and development. Prerequisites: AUECO 203 and 204.

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AUENG 212 The English Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the structures, varieties, and uses of contemporary English. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Formerly part of AUENG 213. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 213, 312 or 313.

AUENG 261 The Modern British Novel Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of early twentieth-century British novelists including Joyce, Woolf, and D. H. Lawrence. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 361.

AUENG 213 The English Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the structures, varieties and uses of contemporary English, and a survey of its historical development. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 211, 212, 311, 312 or 313.

AUENG 265 Modern and Contemporary Poetry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of British, United States, and other English-speaking poets. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 365.

AUENG 215 Creative Writing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the writing of poetry and short fiction. Literary examples are analyzed, and a student is required to write poetry and fiction with attention to specific elements of writing such as imagery, structure, dialogue, and characterization. A central element of the course is peer discussion. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. AUENG 221 Chaucer Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected works by Chaucer, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 321. AUENG 225 Middle Ages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Old and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer) in its social and cultural contexts. Some works are read in translation and some in the original. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 325. AUENG 230 The Early English Renaissance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature of sixteenth-century England, including Shakespeare, showing the influence of Renaissance ideas and literary forms. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 330. AUENG 231 The Later English Renaissance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature of the early seventeenth century (excluding Milton) in relation to the intellectual and historical developments of the period. Representative writers include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell, Bacon, Burton, and Wroth. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 331. AUENG 233 Shakespeare Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-2L-0). Selected works of Shakespeare. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 233, 333, AUDRA 312. AUENG 239 Milton Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the development and artistry of Milton’s poetry and selected prose, with emphasis on Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 339. AUENG 241 The Augustan Age Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature - poetry, prose, drama, and fiction - of the period from 1660 to 1745. The majority of the authors of this period, including Dryden, Wycherley, Behn, Astell, Fyge, Swift, Pope, and Defoe, were above all concerned with a person’s relation to other people, the practical questions of ethical behaviour. The predominant mode was satiric. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 341. AUENG 243 The Age of Sensibility Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature - poetry, prose, and fiction - of the period between 1745 and 1800. This period saw the rise of the novel as an art form with such acknowledged masters as Fielding and Austen. Initially its poets became more introspective, moving away from the predominantly social concerns of the previous age, though by the end of the period writers fired by revolutionary zeal, like Wollstonecraft, Burns, and Blake, attacked the status quo and the power structures it supported. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 343. AUENG 252 The British Romantic Period Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of the Romantic poets, and related prose materials. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 352. AUENG 254 The Earlier Victorian Age Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of three major poets: Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. As well, one novel by Dickens and one novel by another author are studied. Attention is also given to essays by at least three of the following: T. Carlyle, J. H. Newman, J. S. Mill, J. Ruskin, M. Arnold, and T. H. Huxley. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 354. AUENG 255 The Later Victorian Age Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of the later Victorians including Hardy, Wilde, and Gissing. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 355.

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AUENG 267 Contemporary Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative literary works of the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly those written within the last two decades. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 367. AUENG 268 Women and Environmental Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of women’s writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature, primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women’s environmental literature. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 268, 368, AUENV 268, 368. AUENG 269 The End of the World: Contemporary Apocalyptic Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of the contemporary speculative creative writers who consider the end of the world as we know it and the relationship of this literature to a growing body of scientific evidence that warns of global collapse if current damaging human practices are not abated. Consideration will be given to these works as cautionary tales, thought experiments, and sociopolitical satire. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 269, 369, AUENV 269, 369. AUENG 270 United States Literature to 1865 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of American literature from discovery and the Puritan migration in the 16th and 17th centuries through the American Civil War (1861-1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Dickinson and Whitman. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 370. AUENG 271 United States Literature since 1865 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of American literature since the American Civil War (1861-1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Howells, Wharton, Faulkner, Plath, Pynchon, Morrison, Pinsky, Erdrich, Chabon and DeLillo. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 371. AUENG 280 Canadian Literature to 1950 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). As well as giving a broad sweep of the development of Canadian literature from colonial times to the middle of the twentieth century, the course focuses on three movements: the Confederation poets such as Roberts, Carman, Lampman, and D.C. Scott; the emergence of fictional realism in the works of Grove, Callaghan, MacLennan, and Wilson; and the revolt of the poets of the 1920s, F. R. Scott, Smith, Pratt, Klein, and Livesay. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 380. AUENG 281 Canadian Literature since 1950 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Development of literature in English in Canada from the middle of the twentieth century to the present, an age that some have termed postmodernist. The course focuses on the rise and fall of realism in fiction and also the emergence of distinctively Canadian voices among our poets. Included are works by Laurence, Atwood, Wiebe, Munro, Davies, Birney, Page, Purdy, and Layton. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 381. AUENG 290 History of English Literary Criticism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of major developments in literary criticism in England from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 390. AUENG 291 Contemporary Criticism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of trends in contemporary criticism such as Marxist, feminist, structuralist, and poststructuralist criticism. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Notes: Limited to majors and minors in English. AUENG 292 Feminist Critical Theory and Women’s Writing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Several contemporary feminist critical approaches will be used to analyze writings by women from various historical periods and areas of the English-speaking world. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 392.

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AUENG 305 Children’s Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Offers a critical study of literature written for or appropriated by children. The course considers the historical development of children’s literature and examines prevailing and changing attitudes toward children. It addresses major themes and issues in children’s literature, and studies significant texts representative of important genres and trends in the field. Critical analysis of the literature will be stressed. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200-level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 205. AUENG 307 Aboriginal/Indigenous Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Offers a critical study of literature by First Peoples, including narratives from the oral tradition, fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and personal narratives. Themes will include traditional and contemporary perspectives on gender, cultural and political identity, and spirituality. Multiple critical approaches (aesthetic, linguistic, political, historical, and cultural) will be employed in examining this literature, including selections from Native critical texts. Content, period, and national focus will vary. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200-level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 207. AUENG 308 African Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of African literature in English from a variety of genres. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104 and Œ6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 208. AUENG 311 The History of the English Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the historical development of the English language from its Indo-European roots to its present-day forms, including Canadian English. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200-level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Formerly part of AUENG 213. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 211, 213 or 313. AUENG 312 The English Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the structures, varieties, and uses of contemporary English. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200-level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Formerly part of AUENG 213. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 212, 213 or 313. AUENG 313 The English Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the structures, varieties and uses of contemporary English, and a survey of its historical development. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 211, 212, 213, 311, or 312. AUENG 314 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of the poetry instruction begun in AUENG 215. The completion of at least a draft of a chapbook-length collection of poems (20 to 48 pages) is required. Prerequisite: AUENG 215 or consent of the instructor. AUENG 316 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of the fiction instruction begun in AUENG 215. The completion of a chapbook-length collection of fiction (20 to 48 pages) is required. Prerequisite: AUENG 215 or consent of the instructor. AUENG 317 Expository Writing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Working from a common mode of inquiry, the analysis and criticism of literary texts, the course explores some of the prevailing theories of expository writing while providing extensive practice. Prerequisite: Œ6 at a senior level in English (excluding AUENG 204, 205, 206, 211, 212, 215, 311, 312, 314, 316) or consent of the instructor. AUENG 318 Advanced Expository Writing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of AUENG 317. Prerequisite: AUENG 317. AUENG 319 Playwriting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-4L-0). Study of the theory of, and practice in, writing for the stage. Prerequisites: AUENG 215, or consent of the instructor. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 319 and AUDRA 384

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AUENG 321 Chaucer Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected works by Chaucer, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 221. AUENG 325 Middle Ages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Old and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer) in its social and cultural contexts. Some works are read in translation and some in the original. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 225. AUENG 330 The Early English Renaissance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature of sixteenth-century England, including Shakespeare, showing the influence of renaissance ideas and literary forms. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 230. AUENG 331 The Later English Renaissance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature of the early seventeenth century (excluding Milton) in relation to the intellectual and historical developments of the period. Representative writers include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell, Bacon, Burton, and Wroth. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 231. AUENG 333 Shakespeare Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-2L-0). Selected works of Shakespeare. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 333, 233, AUDRA 312. AUENG 339 Milton Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the development and artistry of Milton’s poetry and selected prose, with emphasis on Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 239. AUENG 341 The Augustan Age Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature - poetry, prose, drama, and fiction - of the period from 1660 to 1745. The majority of the authors of this period, including Dryden, Wycherley, Behn, Astell, Fyge, Swift, Pope, and Defoe, were above all concerned with a person’s relation to other people, the practical questions of ethical behaviour. The predominant mode was satiric. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 241. AUENG 343 The Age of Sensibility Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature - poetry, prose, and fiction - of the period between 1745 and 1800. This period saw the rise of the novel as an art form with such acknowledged masters as Fielding and Austen. Initially its poets became more introspective, moving away from the predominantly social concerns of the previous age, though by the end of the period writers fired by revolutionary zeal, like Wollstonecraft, Burns, and Blake, attacked the status quo and the power structures it supported. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 243. AUENG 352 The British Romantic Period Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of the Romantic poets, and related prose materials. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 252. AUENG 354 The Earlier Victorian Age Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of three major poets: Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. As well, one novel by Dickens and one novel by another author are studied. Attention is also given to essays by at least three of the following: T. Carlyle, J. H. Newman, J. S. Mill, J. Ruskin, M. Arnold, and T. H. Huxley. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 254. AUENG 355 The Later Victorian Age Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of the later Victorians including Hardy, Wilde, and Gissing. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 255. AUENG 361 The Modern British Novel Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of early twentieth-century British novelists including Joyce, Woolf, and D. H. Lawrence. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 261. AUENG 365 Modern and Contemporary Poetry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of British, United States, and

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AUENG 302 Women’s Writing and Feminist Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Several contemporary feminist theological approaches will be used to analyze religious and devotional writings by women from various historical periods and areas of the English-speaking world. Texts in the areas of scripture, systematic theology, ethics, and feminist theory and spirituality will be analyzed to understand the importance of feminist theological practice in dialogue with the Judeo-Christian tradition and women’s struggles for justice and wellbeing. Literary texts will include fiction, poetry, essays and personal narrative by authors such as Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Alice Sebold, Emily Dickinson, Adrienne Rich, and Louise Glück. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200-level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 202.

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other English-speaking poets. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 265.

areas of the English-speaking world. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200-level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 292.

AUENG 367 Contemporary Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative literary works of the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly those written within the last two decades. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 267.

AUENG 401 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of English as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ15 at a senior level in English, including at least Œ3 at the 300 level, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

AUENG 368 Women and Environmental Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of women’s writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature, primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women’s environmental literature. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 268, 368, AUENV 268, 368. AUENG 369 The End of the World: Contemporary Apocalyptic Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of the contemporary speculative creative writers who consider the end of the world as we know it and the relationship of this literature to a growing body of scientific evidence that warns of global collapse if current damaging human practices are not abated. Consideration will be given to these works as cautionary tales, thought experiments, and sociopolitical satire. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104 and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 269, 369, AUENV 269, 369. AUENG 370 United States Literature to 1865 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of American literature from discovery and the Puritan migration in the 16th and 17th centuries through the American Civil War (1861-1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Dickinson and Whitman. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 270. AUENG 371 United States Literature since 1865 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of American literature since the American Civil War (1861-1865). Genres will include poetry, personal narrative, speeches and essays, short stories and novels. Authors will include lesser known writers alongside Howells, Wharton, Faulkner, Plath, Pynchon, Morrison, Pinsky, Erdrich, Chabon and DeLillo. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level [excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291]. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 271. AUENG 380 Canadian Literature to 1950 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). As well as giving a broad sweep of the development of Canadian literature from colonial times to the middle of the twentieth century, the course focuses on three movements: the Confederation poets such as Roberts, Carman, Lampman, and D.C. Scott; the emergence of fictional realism in the works of Grove, Callaghan, MacLennan, and Wilson; and the revolt of the poets of the 1920s, F. R. Scott, Smith, Pratt, Klein, and Livesay. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 280. AUENG 381 Canadian Literature since 1950 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Development of literature in English in Canada from the middle of the twentieth century to the present, an age that some have termed postmodernist. The course focuses on the rise and fall of realism in fiction and also the emergence of distinctively Canadian voices among our poets. Included are works by Laurence, Atwood, Wiebe, Munro, Davies, Birney, Page, Purdy, and Layton. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 281. AUENG 385 Modern Canadian Drama Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This is a survey course in Canadian Drama designed to familiarize students with the dramatic literature and theatrical practices of a representative group of twentieth century Canadian playwrights. Prerequisite: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENG 385 and AUDRA 310. AUENG 390 History of English Literary Criticism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of major developments in literary criticism in England from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in AUENG 290. AUENG 392 Feminist Critical Theory and Women’s Writing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Several contemporary feminist critical approaches will be used to analyze writings by women from various historical periods and

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AUENG 402 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of English as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUENG 401 and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENG 410 Contemporary Issues in Renaissance Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of some of the recent theoretical developments in the field of Renaissance literature. Topics may include cultural poetics, the relationship between “literary” and “nonliterary” texts, canon formation, gender studies, feminist approaches, the presence of ideology within texts, and the political contexts for literary production and circulation. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104; and one of AUENG 230, 231, 233, 239, 291, 330, 331, 333, 339. AUENG 411 Historiographic Metafiction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of several postmodern literary texts that self-consciously question how past reality may be adequately known or represented. Such literature exposes the ideological assumptions underlying traditional portrayals of history, portrayals often accepted as natural, apolitical, and universal. In the process, this literature suggests the ways in which the supposedly separable categories of fiction and nonfiction may be seen to interpenetrate. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. AUENG 412 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 420 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 421 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 430 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 431 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 440 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 441 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 450 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourth-

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AUENG 451 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 460 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor. AUENG 461 Selected Topics in English Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Fourthyear standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in English as determined by the instructor.

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Augustana Faculty Environmental Studies, AUENV Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUENV 120 Human Activities and the Natural Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introductory analysis of the interrelationships between society and the natural world, environmental consequences, and human perceptions. The characteristics and interactions of physical environmental systems and various facets of resource management (including forestry, agriculture, fisheries, protected areas, endangered species, and pollution) are described and analyzed. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 120 and AUGEO 120. AUENV 201 Directed Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of environmental studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ6 in Environmental Studies. Note: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies/ Science. An application for Individual Study must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 201 is classified as a science course. AUENV 202 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of environmental studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ6 in Environmental Studies. Note: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies/ Science. An application for Individual Study must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 202 is classified as an arts course. AUENV 210 Environmental Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Environmental Studies. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in an Environmental degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Environmental Studies that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 210, AUBIO 210, AUCHE 210, AUGEO 210. AUENV 233 Soil Science and Soil Resources Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Soil characteristics, formation, processes, occurrence, classification, and management in the natural and modified environment. Prerequisites: Œ3 course in AUBIO, AUCHE, AUENV, or AUPHY. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 233 and AUGEO 233. AUENV 252 Wildlife Diversity of Alberta Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Ecology, conservation, and identification of Alberta’s common wildlife species, with a focus on mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, and invertebrates. A mandatory field trip will be included. Prerequisites: AUENV 120, AUGEO 120 or AUBIO 110. AUENV 260 Environmental Studies Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-3s-0). Practicum placement in a government, industry, or non-governmental organization to gain awareness and experience in an environmental field. Prerequisite: AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120. Notes: Open only to a student with a major in Environmental Studies/Science. AUENV 260 is classified as an arts course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 260, 261, and AUIDS 260.

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AUENV 261 Environmental Science Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-3s-0). Practicum placement in a government, industry, or non-governmental organization to gain awareness and experience in an environmental field. Prerequisites: AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120. Notes: Open only to a student with a major in Environmental Science/Studies. AUENV 261 is classified as a science course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 260, 261 and AUIDS 260. AUENV 268 Women and Environmental Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of women’s writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature, primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women’s environmental literature. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 268, 368, AUENG 268, 368. AUENV 269 The End of the World: Contemporary Apocalyptic Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of the contemporary speculative creative writers who consider the end of the world as we know it and the relationship of this literature to a growing body of scientific evidence that warns of global collapse if current damaging human practices are not abated. Consideration will be given to these works as cautionary tales, thought experiments, and sociopolitical satire. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 269, 369, AUENG 269, 369. AUENV 301 Directed Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental science as defined by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies/Science. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 301 is classified as a science course. AUENV 302 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 302 is classified as an arts course. AUENV 320 Parks and Wilderness Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of scientific principles and concepts underlying parks, wilderness and other protected area systems with emphasis on Canada. Topics include history, philosophy, conceptual frameworks, roles in sustainability, and types of biological and geographic designations. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 320, 420, AUGEO 320, 420. AUENV 322 Economic Botany Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Biological properties, geographical distribution, application/utilization, and history of vascular and nonvascular plants that are economically important in agriculture industry and medicine. Prerequisites: AUBIO 110 and Œ6 of 200-level AUBIO. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 322 and AUBIO 322. AUENV 324 Resource and Environmental Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Integration of both physical and human phenomena in understanding natural resources, their dimensions and boundaries. Basic concepts in resource analysis and management: the decision-making process, management frameworks and strategies, legislation and regulation, impact assessment, the role of perceptions, attitudes and behaviour, and the impact of public participation/interest groups in the development of natural resources. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, 230, 231, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 324 and AUGEO 324. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUENV 327 Environmental Education and Heritage Interpretation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory and methods of communicating environmental and heritage subject matter to a broad audience. Includes discussion of the history, theory, planning, management, implementation, and evaluation of environmental programs. Techniques will apply to a variety of personal and non-personal techniques. Prerequisites: AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120. AUENV 328 Environmental Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of contemporary debates in, and the evolution of, environmental policy and politics. This course will focus on Canadian issues in a comparative perspective, exploring topics such as environmental political theory, the policy cycle, social movements, international issues, and related case

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studies. Prerequisite: Œ3 in either Environmental Studies/Science or Political Studies. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 328 and AUPOL 328. AUENV 334 Field Studies in Environmental Science and Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). A 3-week field course that provides students an opportunity to develop skills in research and study design in the field of Environmental Science and Ecology. Students will live in a field camp to allow them to fully immerse themselves in their research projects. Course content also includes instruction in key aspects of conservation biology and resource management. Prerequisites: AUSTA 215 and AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120 and one of AUGEO 218, AUGEO 230, AUENV 252, AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 334 and AUGEO 334. AUENV 335 Wildlife Ecology and Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory and practices in the study and management of wildlife populations and communities. Population dynamics, habitat assessment and management, conservation challenges, and emerging trends. Computational models and assignments aid theoretical understanding of material. Prerequisites: AUENV 252; AUBIO 253. AUENV 341 Environmental Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relationships between the economy and the environment. Emphasis is placed on the application of economic analysis to various environmental issues. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 341 and AUECO 341. AUENV 344 Environmental Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Systematic study of the dynamic interchange between people and their social and physical environmental contexts. Topics include theories of environmental perception, the effects of crowding, the impact of natural/urban settings, the effects of building design and colours, and managing limited resources. Prerequisites: AUPSY 102; third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 344 and AUPSY 344. AUENV 345 Religion and Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relationship between ecology and religion from Christian and non-Christian perspectives. The course looks at ecological spirituality, ecotheology, animal rights, deep ecology, ecoactivism, and ecofeminism. It also devotes substantial time to ecological themes in Asian (Hindu, Buddhist, and Chinese) and traditional (native American and Australian aboriginal) religions. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 345 and AUREL 345. AUENV 350 Conservation Theory and Biodiversity in Tropical Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-1). Introduction to the basic concepts of conservation biology. The scope of conservation biology and levels of biodiversity are explored, as are aspects of tropical ecology related to conservation. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, 294, or 295, and consent of the instructor(s) based on successful completion of the selection process. Note: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUBIO 459 or AUENV 459. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 350, 450, AUBIO 350, 450. AUENV 354 Freshwater Ecology and Management Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Introduction to the biological, chemical and physical features of freshwater ecosystems, and how they relate to ecological processes in and adjacent to aquatic systems. The course will examine the role of ecological patterns in lakes, ponds, rivers and streams, with an emphasis on freshwater systems and their management in western Canada. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 354, AUBIO 354, and AUGEO 354. The course requires participation in a field trip. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUENV 355 Philosophy, Technology, and the Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigation of the philosophical and social issues related to technology and the environment. The natural/artificial distinction, different senses of “environment” and the ways we understand, package, and manage nature form the foundation of the course. Issues in environmental ethics are also addressed. Thinkers may include Marx, Heidegger, Marcel, Borgmann, Winner, Singer, Regan, and others. Prerequisite: None, but AUPHI 350 would be useful. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 355 and AUPHI 355. AUENV 358 Environmental Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theoretical and empirical examination of the connection between the natural environment and the social world. This involves inquiry into the sociological dimensions of some major contemporary environmental problems, including air, water and soil pollution, decreased biodiversity, deforestation, climate change, and ozone depletion. Particular attention is paid to the social and political connections among issues of industrialization, development, globalization, inequality, gender, social change and environmental destruction. Prerequisites: Third-year standing and AUENV 120 (or its cross-listed equivalent). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 358, 458 and AUSOC 358, 458. AUENV 368 Women and Environmental Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of women’s writing about nature and environment focusing on various themes relevant to environmental literature,

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primarily the various ways that the natural world is represented in literature, and the relationship between cultural constructions of nature and cultural constructions of gender, class, race, and sexuality. Works include fiction, poetry, and/or nonfiction. An introduction to several ecofeminist theorists provides a critical framework for exploring images and themes in women’s environmental literature. Prerequisites: AUENG 103, 104, and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 268, 368, AUENG 268, 368. AUENV 369 The End of the World: Contemporary Apocalyptic Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of the contemporary speculative creative writers who consider the end of the world as we know it and the relationship of this literature to a growing body of scientific evidence that warns of global collapse if current damaging human practices are not abated. Consideration will be given to these works as cautionary tales, thought experiments, and sociopolitical satire. Prerequisites: AUENG 103 and 104 and Œ6 in English at the 200 level (excluding AUENG 204, 215, 291). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 269, 369, AUENG 269, 369. AUENV 375 Canadian Environmental History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical examination of the dynamic interrelationships between the natural world and humans, with a focus on Canadian issues within a North American context. Topics and perspectives will include: Aboriginal peoples, colonization, fur trade, exploration, settlement, western agriculture, science, and the conservation movement. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 375, 475, AUHIS 375, 475. AUENV 401 Directed Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental science as defined by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies/Science. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 401 is classified as a science courses. AUENV 402 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area in environmental studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ6 in Environmental Studies. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Environmental Studies. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUENV 402 is classified as an arts course. AUENV 410 Selected Topics in Environmental Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a selected topic in environmental studies. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Third-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in Environmental Studies and other disciplines as determined by the instructor. AUENV 420 Parks and Wilderness Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of scientific principles and concepts underlying parks, wilderness, and other protected area systems with emphasis on Canada. Topics include history, philosophy, conceptual frameworks, roles in sustainability, and types of biological and geographical designations. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120; and one of AUBIO 350, 351, 353, 359, 450, 459, AUENV 324, 350, 353, 359, 450, 459, AUGEO 324, 351. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 320, 420, AUGEO 320, 420. AUENV 421 Environmental Science: History and Impacts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Overview of the historical developments, past and current impacts, and changing roles of the field of environmental science. Prerequisites: One of AUBIO 350, 353, 450; AUENV 320, 324, 350, 353, 450; AUGEO 320, 324 and at least fourth-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 421 and AUGEO 421. AUENV 425 Environmental Impact Assessment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History and theory of environmental impact assessment; legislative and policy frameworks; role in resource planning; methods and techniques for the assessment of impacts; future directions. Prerequisites: One of AUENV 324, AUGEO 324, and AUBIO 253. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 425, AUGEO 425. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUENV 459 Field Studies in Tropical Ecology and Conservation Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0 in 2 weeks). Field course that addresses problems of biodiversity and conservation in tropical environments. The student participates in field workshops, and designs and conducts his or her own field project to answer questions related to ecological and biological conservation. Prerequisite: AUBIO 350 or AUENV 350, and consent of the instructors based on successful completion of the selection process. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUBIO 459 and AUENV 459. Students who have received credit for AUBIO 359 or AUENV 359 may enrol in AUBIO 459 or AUENV 459 in a subsequent year based on successful completion of the selection process. Requires payment of additional

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University of Alberta

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AUENV 475 Canadian Environmental History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical examination of the dynamic interrelationships between the natural world and humans, with a focus on Canadian issues within a North American context. Topics and perspectives will include: Aboriginal peoples, colonization, fur trade, exploration, settlement, western agriculture, science, and the conservation movement. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 375, 475, AUHIS 375, 475.

231.37

Augustana Faculty - French, AUFRE Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUFRE 101 Beginners’ French I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). AUFRE 101 and 102 are designed to develop ability in reading and writing French, with a strong emphasis on the development of comprehension and oral communication skills. During this process the student participates in a wide variety of interactive activities and is also exposed to contemporary francophone culture. These two courses not only encourage the student to think critically about the principles of grammar as they relate to the French language, but also stimulate an in-depth understanding of the principles by which language functions in general. These two courses also lead the student through the steps of reflective learning as he or she considers and discusses language learning strategies. Notes: The course is not open to a student with credit in French 20, or to a student with French 30 or equivalent. AUFRE 101 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in French. AUFRE 102 Beginners’ French II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUFRE 101. Prerequisite: French 20 or AUFRE 101 or consent of the instructor. Notes: The course is not open to a student with French 30 or equivalent. AUFRE 102 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in French. AUFRE 201 Intermediate French I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). Intensive training in spoken and written French. The major focus is on communication. Prerequisite: French 30 or AUFRE 102. Notes: A student wishing to register in AUFRE 201 must first take an on-line placement test. The purpose of the test is to advise the student of the appropriate level at which to begin university French. AUFRE 202 Intermediate French II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Further development of the speaking, reading, and writing skills acquired in AUFRE 201. The major focus is on formal grammar. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 201; French 31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion), with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor. AUFRE 210 French Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of French. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Modern Languages degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in French that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUFRE 210, AUENG 204, AUDRA 228, AUGER 210, AUSCA 210. AUFRE 222 French Pronunciation and Phonetics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the French Phonetic System to improve French pronunciation. Prerequisite: AUFRE 201. Corequisite: AUFRE 202. AUFRE 234 Selected Topics in French Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUFRE 235 Selected Topics in French Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUFRE 237 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUFRE 239 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUFRE 301 Advanced French I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). As a normal sequel to AUFRE 202, the course develops further the speaking, reading, and writing skills acquired at the Intermediate level. The major focus is on formal grammar. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 202; French

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31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion), with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor. AUFRE 305 Aspects of Civilization and Culture of France I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). French civilization and culture up to the French Revolution as seen from historical, geographical, social, and cultural points of view. The course aims at improving the student’s command of oral and written French. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 202; Français 20 or 30, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French 31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion), with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor. AUFRE 306 Aspects of Civilization and Culture of France II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). French civilization and culture of modern France as seen from historical, geographical, social, and cultural points of view. The course aims at improving the student’s command of oral and written French. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 202; Français 20 or 30 or French 31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion) with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor. AUFRE 307 Topics in the History and Culture of Southern France Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Aspects of the social, political and religious history, as well as the arts, architecture and literature of Southern France. All lectures and readings are in English. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUFRE 307 and AUHIS 329. AUFRE 308 Tour of Southern France Œ2 (fi 4) (Spring/Summer, 2 weeks). Tour of Southern France: History and culture. To complement the topics covered in AUFRE 307. Prerequisite: AUFRE 305 or 307. Notes: Enrolment limited to a maximum of 10 students. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUFRE 308 and AUHIS 333. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUFRE 310 Advanced Translation: French into English Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). For students having a fair knowledge of French and the total fluency in English. The aim of the course is to improve the student’s ability to understand and render into idiomatic English complex constructions, nuances of meaning, and stylistic devices. The translation of texts by Francophone authors forms the basis of class activity. Prerequisite: AUFRE 202. AUFRE 311 Advanced Translation: English into French Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive training in translation into French of contemporary texts written in English. Prerequisite: AUFRE 301. AUFRE 317 Business French Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-0-1). Study of the French language (oral and written) as used in the francophone business milieu and in the administrative sector. A student is introduced to the technical vocabulary required to function competently in situations revolving around business life. Prerequisite: AUFRE 301 or consent of the instructor. AUFRE 331 French-Canadian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the literature of French Canada through a study of representative texts. Included are works by Louis Hémon, Gabrielle Roy, Anne Hébert, Gérard Bessette, Marie-Claire Blais, Emile Nelligan, and Michel Tremblay or Marcel Dubé. Prerequisite: AUFRE 392 or 393. AUFRE 332 Introduction to French-Canadian Short Stories Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to short stories of twentieth-century French Canada. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 202; Français 20 or 30, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French 31a or 31b or 31c, with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; French Language Arts 20 or 30 (equal to French immersion), with a sufficient score on the on-line placement test; consent of the instructor. AUFRE 333 Aspects of French-Canadian Civilization and Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Evolution of political, economic, and social patterns in Québec. Documentary sources from the mass media and artistic productions are studied as expressions of lifestyles, ideas, and values. Prerequisite: One of AUFRE 202, Français 20, 30, French 31a or 31b or 31c, consent of the instructor. AUFRE 334 Selected Topics in French Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUFRE 335 Selected Topics in French Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUFRE 337 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year.

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Course Listings A

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University of Alberta

AUFRE 339 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in French literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUFRE 341 Children’s Literature in French Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The critical analysis of selected children’s literature written in French. These works will be examined in their historical perspective. Prerequisite: AUFRE 392 or 393 or consent of the instructor. AUFRE 342 Francophone Women’s Writing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The study of selected works by Francophone women writers. Feminist literary theory is employed to analyze the texts. Prerequisite: AUFRE 392 or 393. AUFRE 355 French Literature of the Seventeenth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the literature and society of the century of Louis XIV through a study of representative texts including works from what is generally regarded as the golden age of French drama. Prerequisite: AUFRE 392 or 393. AUFRE 370 French Literature of the Nineteenth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to French literature of the nineteenth century through a study of representative texts which are analyzed in depth. Prerequisite: AUFRE 392 or 393. AUFRE 380 French Literature of the Twentieth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to French literature of the twentieth century through a study of representative texts which are analyzed in depth. Prerequisite: AUFRE 392 or 393. AUFRE 390 Introduction to French Literature I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the study of French literature as a discipline. Texts chosen from different periods and genres of French literature are situated in their socio-historical context and studied not only for their own intrinsic value, but also for their specific value in assisting a student to master techniques of textual analysis. The course focuses on the postrevolutionary era and is taught in French. Assignments are submitted in English. Prerequisite: AUFRE 202 or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUFRE 390 and 392. AUFRE 391 Introduction to French Literature II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the study of French literature as a discipline. Texts chosen from different periods and genres of French literature are situated in their socio-historical context and studied not only for their own intrinsic value, but also for their specific value in assisting a student to master techniques of textual analysis. The course focuses on the prerevolutionary era and is taught in French. Assignments are submitted in English. Prerequisite: AUFRE 202 or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUFRE 391 and 393. AUFRE 392 Introduction to French Literature I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the study of French literature as a discipline. Texts chosen from different periods and genres of French literature are located in their socio-historical context and studied not only for their own intrinsic value, but also for their specific value in assisting a student to master techniques of textual analysis. The course focuses on the postrevolutionary period. Prerequisite: AUFRE 202 or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUFRE 390 and 392. AUFRE 393 Introduction to French Literature II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the study of French literature as a discipline. Texts chosen from different periods and genres of French literature are located in their socio-historical context and studied not only for their own intrinsic value, but also for their specific value in assisting a student to master techniques of textual analysis. The course focuses on the prerevolutionary era. Prerequisite: AUFRE 202 or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUFRE 391 and 393. AUFRE 402 Directed Study: Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of the French language. Prerequisite: AUFRE 301 or consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUFRE 403 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of French literature and/or civilization as defined by the student and the instructor. Prerequisite: AUFRE 301. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

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individual instructor in the light of student needs, and vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or consent of the instructor. AUFRE 498 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, etc. Focus and content of each course are determined by the individual instructor in the light of student needs, and vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or consent of the instructor. AUFRE 499 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, etc. Focus and content of each course are determined by the individual instructor in the light of student needs, and vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or consent of the instructor.

231.38

Augustana Faculty - Geography, AUGEO Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUGEO 120 Human Activities and the Natural Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introductory analysis of the interrelationships between society and the natural world, environmental consequences, and human perceptions. The characteristics and interactions of physical environmental systems and various facets of resource management (including forestry, agriculture, fisheries, protected areas, endangered species, and pollution) are described and analyzed. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 120 and AUENV 120. AUGEO 210 Geography and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Geography. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Geography minor. Corequisite: Any senior course in Geography that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 210, AUBIO 210, AUCHE 210, AUENV 210. AUGEO 218 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to fundamentals and applications of Geographic Information Systems. Topics include the nature of geographic data, geo-referencing systems, geographic modelling, data collection and management, and spatial analysis. Practical applications of GIS will be emphasized with the use of appropriate computer software. Prerequisite: Any 100-level science course. AUGEO 230 Geomorphology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Analysis of (1) geomorphological processes and agents (such as movement of the earth’s crust, volcanism, water, glaciers, waves, currents, wind, and gravity) that create and modify the earth’s surface and (2) landforms. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGEO 231 Climatology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Study of (1) elements and processes of climate and weather; (2) distributions and regional patterns of climates; and (3) interrelationships among climates, plants, animals, and people. Note: AUGEO 230 need not precede AUGEO 231. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGEO 233 Soil Science and Soil Resources Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Soil characteristics, formation, processes, occurrence, classification, and management in the natural and modified environment. Prerequisites: Œ3 course in AUBIO, AUCHE, AUENV, or AUPHY. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 233 and AUGEO 233. AUGEO 242 Cultural Geography of Scandinavia Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of Scandinavian life and achievement, past and present, with emphasis on social and cultural conditions against a geographical and historical background. All lectures and readings are in English. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 242 and AUSCA 231.

AUFRE 496 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, etc. Focus and content of each course are determined by the individual instructor in the light of student needs, and vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or consent of the instructor.

AUGEO 301 Directed Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Œ6 in Geography. Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 301 is classified as a science course.

AUFRE 497 Selected Topics in French Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, etc. Focus and content of each course are determined by the

AUGEO 302 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor.

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University of Alberta

AUGEO 320 Parks and Wilderness Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of scientific principles and concepts underlying parks, wilderness, and other protected area systems with emphasis on Canada. Topics include history, philosophy, conceptual frameworks, roles in sustainability, and types of biological and geographical designations. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 320, 420, AUENV 320, 420. AUGEO 324 Resource and Environmental Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Integration of both physical and human phenomena in understanding natural resources, their dimensions and boundaries. Basic concepts in resource analysis and management are explored: the decision making process, management frameworks and strategies, legislation and regulation, impact assessment, the role of perceptions, attitudes and behaviour, and the impact of public participation/interest groups in the development of natural resources. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, 230, 231, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 324 and AUENV 324. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGEO 334 Field Studies in Environmental Science and Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). A 3-week field course that provides students an opportunity to develop skills in research and study design in the field of Environmental Science and Ecology. Students will live in a field camp to allow them to fully immerse themselves in their research projects. Course content also includes instruction in key aspects of conservation biology and resource management. Prerequisites: AUSTA 215 and AUENV 120 or AUGEO 120 and one of AUGEO 218, AUGEO 230, AUENV 252, AUBIO 253. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 334 and AUGEO 334. AUGEO 341 Geography of the Canadian North Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the biophysical environments, resources, economics, and settlements of northern regions of Canada. Prerequisites: One of AUPED 184, 286; Œ3 in Geography and consent of the instructor. Notes: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUGEO 343 or AUPED 388. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 341, 342, and AUPED 387. AUGEO 341 is classified as an arts course. AUGEO 342 Geography of the Canadian North Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the biophysical environments, resources, economics, and settlements of northern regions of Canada. Prerequisites: One of AUPED 184, 286; Œ3 in Geography and consent of the instructor. Notes: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUGEO 343 or AUPED 388. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 341, 342, and AUPED 387. AUGEO 342 is classified as a science course. AUGEO 343 Expedition in the Canadian North Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). Examination, involving a three- to four-week expedition in the summer, of the biophysical environments, resources, economics, and settlements of northern regions of Canada. Prerequisites: AUGEO 341, 342 or AUPED 387, and consent of the instructor(s). Notes: Expedition costs, as well as course tuition, are the student’s responsibility. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 343 and AUPED 388. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGEO 351 Biogeography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Analysis of the spatial patterns of biotic systems and species. The course examines their past and present distribution patterns in the context of biological and ecological processes and human impacts. The course employs several methods of analysis, including geographic information systems. Prerequisite: AUBIO 253. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 351 and AUBIO 351. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGEO 401 Directed Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Œ6 in science Geography. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 401 is classified as a science course. AUGEO 402 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Supervised research project and intensive study of a specific area of geography as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Œ6 in Geography. Notes: Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An “Application for Individual Study” must

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be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 402 is classified as an arts course. AUGEO 410 Selected Topics in Geography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a selected topic in geography. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Prerequisites: Third-year standing or consent of the instructor; previous course(s) in Geography and other disciplines as determined by the instructor. AUGEO 420 Parks and Wilderness Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of scientific principles and concepts underlying parks, wilderness, and other protected area systems with emphasis on Canada. Topics include history, philosophy, conceptual frameworks, roles in sustainability, and types of biological and geographical designations. Prerequisite: One of AUBIO 253, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120; and one of AUBIO 350, 351, 353, 359, 450, 459, AUENV 324, 350, 351, 353, 359, 450, 459, AUGEO 324. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 320, 420, AUENV 320, 420. AUGEO 421 Environmental Science: History and Impacts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Overview of the historical developments, past and current impacts, and changing roles of the field of environmental science. Prerequisites: One of AUBIO 350, 353, 450; AUENV 320, 324, 350, 353, 450; AUGEO 320, 324 and at least fourth-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 421 and AUENV 421. AUGEO 425 Environmental Impact Assessment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History and theory of environmental impact assessment; legislative and policy frameworks; role in resource planning;methods and techniques for the assessment of impacts; future directions. Prerequisites: One of AUENV 324, AUGEO 324, and AUBIO 253. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 425, AUGEO 425. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

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Augustana Faculty - German, AUGER Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUGER 101 Beginners’ German I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). German 101 and 102 are designed to develop ability in reading and writing German, with a strong emphasis on the development of comprehension and oral communication skills. During this process, the student participates in a wide variety of interactive activities and is also exposed to contemporary culture of German-speaking countries. These two courses not only encourage the student to think critically about the principles of grammar as they relate to the German language, but also stimulate an in-depth understanding of the principles by which language functions in general. These two courses also lead the student through the steps of reflective learning as he or she considers and discusses language learning strategies. Notes: The course is not open to a student with credit in German 30. AUGER 101 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in German. AUGER 102 Beginners’ German II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUGER 101. Prerequisite: AUGER 101. Notes: The course is not open to a student with credit in German 30. AUGER 102 does not count toward the major in Modern Languages or the minor in German. AUGER 200 Intermediate German I and II Œ6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable). Intensive course designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing, reading skills acquired in Beginners’ German through classroom instruction, excursions, and immersion experience, including living in a German home. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of the culture of the German-speaking countries and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: One of AUGER 102, demonstration of AUGER 102 equivalency by means of a placement exam administered by the instructor, one year Beginners’ German at a Canadian university. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 200, 201, 202. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGER 201 Intermediate German I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). Designed to develop fluency in speaking, with emphasis on comprehension and writing skills. The essential rules of grammar are studied. Prerequisite: One of AUGER 102, demonstration of AUGER 102 equivalency by means of a placement examination administered by the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 200, 201.

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A Course Listings

Prerequisite: Œ6 in Geography. Admission to the course normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Geography. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGEO 302 is classified as an arts course.

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AUGER 202 Intermediate German II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUGER 201. Prerequisite: AUGER 201. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 202, 200. AUGER 210 German Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of German. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Modern Languages degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in German that requires library research. Notes: The corequisites must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 210, AUENG 204, AUDRA 228, AUFRE 210, AUSCA 210. AUGER 214 German Media Language: Comprehension and Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0). Intensive course in German media language acquisition through aural, visual, and written comprehension and translation exercises. Translation includes lyrics and radio plays (on cassettes) and videos on German/European history, geography, political science, economics, and philosophy. Prerequisite: AUGER 202. AUGER 230 Selected Topics in German Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 231 German Culture and Civilization I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to German culture and civilization, taught in English. Major cultural trends and movements from early times to 1800 are studied. Notes: The course does not count toward the minor in German or the major in Modern Languages. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 231 and 233. AUGER 233 German Culture and Civilization I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to German culture and civilization, taught in English. Major cultural trends and movements from early times to 1800 are studied. All assignments for the course are submitted in German. Prerequisite: AUGER 302. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 233 and 231. AUGER 235 Selected Topics in German Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 236 German Culture and Civilization II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to German culture and civilization, taught in English. Major cultural trends and movements from 1800 to the present time are studied. Notes: The course does not count toward the minor in German or the major in Modern Languages. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 236 and 238. AUGER 237 Selected Topics in German Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 238 German Culture and Civilization II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to German culture and civilization, taught in English. Major cultural trends and movements from 1800 to the present time are studied. All assignments for the course are submitted in German. Prerequisite: AUGER 200 or 202. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 238 and 236. AUGER 239 Selected Topics in German Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 291 German Drama in Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of German drama in English translation from the eighteenth century to the present. AUGER 292 German Fiction in Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of German prose fiction in English translation from the eighteenth century to the present. AUGER 293 Women and German Literature in Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of German literature in English translation written by women, and the role of women in German literature in general. Feminist literary theory is employed to analyze the texts. AUGER 300 Advanced German I and II Œ6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable). Intensive course designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing, reading skills acquired in Intermediate German through classroom instruction, excursions, and immersion experience, including living in a German home. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of the culture of the German-speaking countries and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUGER 200 or 202; or two years of German study at a Canadian university, including one year Beginners’ level and one year Intermediate level. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 300, 301 and 302. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGER 301 Advanced German I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). Thorough review of German grammar and study of

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refined stylistics and idioms as represented in selections of twentieth-century short stories. Colloquial expressions presently in use are studied through discussion and audiovisual presentation. Prerequisite: AUGER 200 or 202. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 301, 300. AUGER 302 Advanced German II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUGER 301. Prerequisite: AUGER 301. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGER 302, 300. AUGER 313 Advanced German Grammar and Stylistics: Journalistic Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Theoretical and practical study of the more complex areas of grammar, style, and idiomatic usage in journalistic writings. Emphasis is on contemporary media language. Prerequisite: AUGER 301 or consent of the instructor. AUGER 314 Advanced Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory and practice of translation of texts in contemporary German writing. Prerequisite: AUGER 302. AUGER 317 Business German Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the German language (oral and written) as used in the German business milieu and in the administrative sector. The student is introduced to the technical vocabulary required to function competently in situations revolving around business life. Prerequisite: AUGER 302 or consent of the instructor. AUGER 321 Survey of Literary Periods I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to German literary periods from the beginning of recorded German literature to the Romantic period (ca. 1800). Prerequisite: AUGER 300 or 301. Corequisite: AUGER 302. AUGER 322 Survey of Literary Periods II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to German literary periods from “Biedermeier” (ca. 1830) to the present. Prerequisite: AUGER 300 or 301. Corequisite: AUGER 302. AUGER 334 Selected Topics in German Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 335 Selected Topics in German Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German language studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 337 Selected Topics in German Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 339 Selected Topics in German Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in German literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUGER 351 Eighteenth-Century Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of selected representative works by poets of the following literary periods: Enlightenment, “Empfindsamkeit”, “Sturm und Drang”, classicism, and romanticism. Prerequisite: AUGER 300 or 301. Corequisite: AUGER 302. AUGER 361 Nineteenth-Century Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of selected representative works of Biedermeier, realism, and naturalism. Prerequisite: AUGER 300 or 301. Corequisite: AUGER 302. AUGER 371 Twentieth-Century Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of selected representative works by writers of the following periods: expressionism, post-World War I, World War II, up to the end of the century. Prerequisite: AUGER 300 or 301. Corequisite: AUGER 302 AUGER 400 Advanced German III and IV Œ6 (fi 12) (Spring/Summer, variable). Intensive course designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing, reading skills acquired in Advanced German through classroom instruction, excursions, and immersion experience, including living in a German home. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of the culture of the German-speaking countries and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUGER 300 or 302; or three years of German study at a Canadian university, including one year Beginners’ level, one year Intermediate level and one year Advanced level. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUGER 401 Selected Topics in German Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Content varies from year to year, but in general it introduces a specific literary period, or the selected works of some prominent authors who are significant because of their role in the emergence of a new literary genre or a new philosophy. Prerequisite: One of AUGER 300, 302, or 313, consent of the instructor.

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AUGER 403 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of German as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGER 322 and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUGER 415 German Immersion Community Service-Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). Students provide 50 hours of community service to participants in the Canadian Summer School in Germany program in the form of supervised classroom support and peer consultation. They also critically reflect on curriculum as planned, taught, and interpreted and language teacherstudent professional interpersonal relations. Prerequisite: Having participated in the Canadian Summer School in Germany and having completed AUGER 200, 300, or 400 and consent of the instructor. Note: Students enrolling in this course must be able to demonstrate a high level of German language proficiency.

231.40

Augustana Faculty - Global and Development Studies, AUGDS Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUGDS 103 Introduction to Global and Political Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the ideas and key concepts that comprise the vocabulary of global and political studies. The course considers such ideas as democracy, order, power, authority, justice, freedom, development, globalization and equality. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 103 and AUPOL 103. AUGDS 122 Development Studies Seminar Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-6s-0). Integrative study of development issues and strategies based on work experiences in rural communities in an African, Asian, or Latin American country. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 122, 222, 322, AUSPA 240, 340. AUGDS 123 Development Studies Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). By working in an African, Asian, or Latin American country in projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing co-operatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 123, 223, 323, AUSPA 241, 341. AUGDS 124 Development Studies Seminar (Canada) Œ6 (fi 12) (first term, 0-6s-0). Integrative study of development issues and strategies based on work experiences in rural communities in Canada. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 124, 224, 324. AUGDS 125 Development Studies Practicum (Canada) Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-0-6). By working in Canada in development projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing cooperatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. AUGDS 222 Development Studies Seminar Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-6s-0). Integrative study of development issues and strategies based on work experiences in rural communities in an African, Asian, or Latin American country. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 122, 222, 322, AUSPA 240, 340. AUGDS 223 Development Studies Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). By working in an African, Asian, or Latin American country in projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid,sustainable farming, developing co-operatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 123, 223, 323, AUSPA 241, 341. AUGDS 225 Development Studies Practicum (Canada) Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-0-6). By working in Canada in development projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing cooperatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects

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of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. AUGDS 325 Development Studies Practicum (Canada) Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-0-6). By working in Canada in development projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing cooperatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. AUGDS 322 Development Studies Seminar Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-6s-0). Integrative study of development issues and strategies based on work experiences in rural communities in an African, Asian, or Latin American country. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 122, 222, 322, AUSPA 240, 340. AUGDS 323 Development Studies Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). By working in an African, Asian, or Latin American country in projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing co-operatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 123, 223, 323, AUSPA 241, 341. AUGDS 324 Development Studies Seminar (Canada) Œ6 (fi 12) (first term, 0-6s-0). Integrative study of development issues and strategies based on work experiences in rural communities in Canada. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 124, 224, 324. AUGDS 325 Development Studies Practicum (Canada) Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-0-6). By working in Canada in development projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing cooperatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of an integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. AUGDS 427 Senior Global and Development Studies Research Seminar  I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Preparation of a literature review, and research proposal, and presentation. Research may be participatory, qualitative, quantitative, archival, community-based, and may include a practical component. Classes will provide supportive and critical analysis throughout students research process and examine issues, theories, and practices central to global and development studies and social change. This course integrates the varied disciplinary approaches and practices experienced throughout the program. Prerequisite: Third or fourth-year standing. Only open to majors in IDS-Global and Development Studies. Note: This course can only be taken by students also registered in AUGDS 428. AUGDS 428 Senior Global and Development Studies Research Seminar  II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of AUGDS 427. This course involves implementing research, presentation of results, and a final project. Research may be participatory, qualitative, quantitative, archival, community-based, and may include a practical component. Classes will provide supportive and critical analysis throughout students research process and examine issues, theories, and practices central to global and development studies and social change. This course integrates the varied disciplinary approaches and practices experienced throughout the program. Prerequisites: AUGDS 427 and third or fourth-year standing. Only open to majors in AUIDS-Global and Development Studies.

231.41

Augustana Faculty - Greek, AUGRE Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUGRE 101 Beginners’ Hellenistic Greek I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). Introduction to the basic grammar and vocabulary of Hellenistic Greek. AUGRE 102 Beginners’ Hellenistic Greek II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUGRE 101. Prerequisite: AUGRE 101. AUGRE 203 Intermediate Greek I (Hellenistic) Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Readings in the Hellenistic Greek of the New Testament, Septuagint, Apostolic Fathers, and other Hellenistic works. Review of Greek grammar. Prerequisite: AUGRE 102. AUGRE 204 Intermediate Greek II (Classical) Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected readings in classical Greek literature. Classical Greek is introduced through prose composition. Prerequisite: AUGRE 203. AUGRE 298 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic

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AUGER 402 Directed Study: Translation Techniques Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Intensive study in translation techniques (GermanEnglish, English-German). Specific literature (e.g., reports, sermons, essays, philosophical or business writings) is chosen by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGER 302 and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

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or classical Greek to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 203 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 204 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 299 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 203 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 204 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 303 Directed Reading III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 304 Directed Reading IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 305 Directed Reading V Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 306 Directed Reading VI Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 307 Directed Reading VII Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 308 Directed Reading VIII Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 309 Directed Reading IX Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUGRE 310 Directed Reading X Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Readings from a specific area of Hellenistic or classical Greek as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUGRE 298 for Hellenistic Greek texts, AUGRE 299 for classical Greek texts, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses.

231.42

Augustana Faculty - History, AUHIS Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUHIS 104 World History: The West Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to understanding our world: aspects of European, North American, and Islamic history. AUHIS 105 World History: The East and the South Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to understanding our world: aspects of Asian, African, and Latin American history.

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AUHIS 190 The Historian’s Craft: Research Skills and Tools Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the skills and methods needed for the study of history. The course familiarizes students with the specialized vocabulary of the discipline. It guides students through all the steps necessary to write a research paper: the choice and delineation of a research topic, the elaboration of the thesis, the collection of data and the treatment of the information, the outline and the writing of the paper. Note: This course is only open to students with a major or a minor in History. AUHIS 201 European History I: Fall of the Roman Empire to the French Revolution Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major themes in the development of European society from the fall of the Roman Empire in the West to the eve of the French Revolution. AUHIS 202 European History II: French Revolution to the Present Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the social, political, and military history of Europe from the French Revolution to the present. Topics include the causes and results of revolutions, strategy and diplomacy of the two World Wars, and the emergence of a new postwar Europe. AUHIS 203 History of Ancient Greece I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of Greece from the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 203 and AUCLA 221. AUHIS 204 History of Ancient Greece II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of Greece from the Persian Wars to the end of the Hellenistic Age. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 204 and AUCLA 222. AUHIS 207 History of the Roman Republic Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the Roman Republic from its beginnings to the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 207 and AUCLA 223. AUHIS 208 History of the Roman Empire Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of the Roman Empire from the time of Augustus to the fall of the West in the fifth century A.D. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 208 and AUCLA 224. AUHIS 212 Sport, Physical Activity, and the Body: Historical Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of major themes in the history of sport, physical activity, and the body. Beginning with the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome, the course explores the social, cultural, political, philosophical, religious, and economic factors that have influenced sport, physical education, and attitudes toward the body in various time periods. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 212 and AUPED 262. AUHIS 242 British History to 1688 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the salient features of British history from the Roman conquest to 1688. AUHIS 243 British History since 1688 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the salient features of British history from 1688 to the present. AUHIS 250 United States History to 1865 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the social, political, and military history of the United States from Colonial times to the Civil War. Topics include European settlement, the War of Independence, making a new country, westward expansion, slavery, and the disruption of the Union. AUHIS 251 United States History since 1865 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the social, political, and military history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. Topics include Reconstruction, industrial and economic development, Indian wars, the Great Depression, World Wars and the Cold War, and early twenty-first century American exceptionalism. AUHIS 260 An Introduction to the Study of Canadian History to 1867 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Canada’s political, social and economic development from life before European Contact to Confederation. Lectures, assigned readings, films and discussions will provide factual background on Canadian history and stimulate critical thinking. AUHIS 261 An Introduction to the Study of Canadian History, 1867 to the Present Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Political, social, economic and cultural questions of Canada since 1867. Taking a thematic approach, lectures, assigned readings, films and discussions will provide factual background on Canadian history and stimulate critical thinking. AUHIS 262 History of Canadian Economic Development Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of Canada’s economic development from before Confederation until the present. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 262 and AUECO 251.

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AUHIS 285 Historical Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of History. Prerequisite: Second year standing in a History degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in History that requires library research. Notes: The corequisites must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 285, AUART 228, AUPHI 228, AUREL 228.

AUHIS 338 History of the Soviet Union, 1941 to 1991 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical survey of Soviet domestic and foreign policy from 1941 to 1991. AUHIS 347 The Industrial Revolution in Britain Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intellectual, social, and economic history of Britain, ca. 1750 to 1850. Prerequisite: AUHIS 243 or consent of the instructor. AUHIS 356 History of the United States West Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the western United States from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. Special emphasis is given to the west’s integration into the industrial and urban life of the nation. Prerequisite: AUHIS 251 or consent of the instructor.

AUHIS 291 Cuban History Since 1895 Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Study of Cuban history from the War of Independence (1895-1898) to the present. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 251 and AUHIS 291. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program.

AUHIS 358 History of United States Foreign Relations to 1914 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of United States foreign relations from 1774 to 1914, the problems of winning and maintaining independence, a century of expansion at home and overseas, Civil War diplomacy, the emergence of the United States as a world power. Prerequisite: AUHIS 250 or consent of the instructor.

AUHIS 312 The Modern Olympic Games Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the historical development of the modern Olympic Games. Topics include politics, nationalism, culture, commercialism, media, gender, race and identity. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 312 and AUPED 369.

AUHIS 359 History of United States Foreign Relations since 1914 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Emphasis upon United States leadership in world affairs in the twentieth century, United States relations with the Far East and Latin America, the breakdown of neutrality in the two World Wars, the search for collective security. Prerequisite: AUHIS 251 or consent of the instructor.

AUHIS 316 Europe in the Eighteenth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Royal absolutism from Russia to France, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Prerequisite: None, but AUHIS 201 and 202 would be useful.

AUHIS 360 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261.

AUHIS 322 Nineteenth-Century Europe to 1849 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Restoration, liberalism, nationalism, and revolution. Prerequisite: None, but AUHIS 202 would be useful. AUHIS 323 Nineteenth-Century Europe since 1849 Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Industrialization and modernization of continental Europe; origins of World War I. Prerequisite: None, but AUHIS 202 would be useful. AUHIS 325 Twentieth-Century Europe Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-0). Social, economic, national, intellectual, and military development of Europe from World War I to the end of the twentieth century. Prerequisite : None, but AUHIS 202 would be useful. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 325 and 425. AUHIS 327 Estonia Study Tour Preparation and Orientation Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 1-0-0). This course provides the necessary preparation for the Estonia Study Tour course (AUECO 362 or AUHIS 334). The course is taught as an online module-based course with some scheduled face-to-face meetings on the Augustana Campus. Prerequisites: At least 3 credits in AUECO, AUHIS, AUPOL or consent of the instructor. Corequisites: AUECO 362 or AUHIS 334. AUHIS 328 Germany since Frederick the Great Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of modern German history from Frederick the Great (1740) to the defeat of Hitler in 1945. AUHIS 329 Topics in the History and Culture of Southern France Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Aspects of the social, political and religious history, as well as the arts, architecture and literature of Southern France. All lectures and readings are in English. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 329 and AUFRE 307. AUHIS 332 Eastern Europe since World War I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Independent East European states, Nazi domination, Soviet conquest, “real-socialism.” Prospects for the future are considered. AUHIS 333 Tour of Southern France Œ2 (fi 4) (Spring/Summer, variable). Tour of Southern France: History and culture. To complement the topics covered in AUHIS 329. Prerequisite: AUHIS 329. Notes: Enrolment limited to a maximum of 10 students. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 333 and AUFRE 308. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUHIS 334 Estonia Study Tour Œ2 (fi 4) (Spring/Summer, 2 weeks). A two-week study trip to Estonia, in the course of which students will be able to take part in the International Summer Programme offered by the University of Tartu and classes led by Augustana instructors. The programme includes lectures in a number of disciplines, as well as visits to historical sites and business in Estonia and in the neighbouring Baltic countries and Finland. Students will gain a better understanding of the history and economic development of the region. Prerequisites: At least 3 senior credits in AUECO, AUHIS, AUPOL or consent of the instructor; one of AUECO 361 or AUHIS 327; and successful completion of a selection process. AUHIS 337 History of the Soviet Union, 1917 to 1941 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical survey of Soviet domestic and foreign policy from 1917 to 1941.

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AUHIS 361 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261. AUHIS 362 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261. AUHIS 363 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261. AUHIS 366 History of The Canadian West Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Economic, political and social development of western Canada. The course will compare and contrast the Canadian West with the American West, discussing the two distinct western myths. The seminar starts with the First Peoples and concludes with an assessment of western Canadian regionalism and “alienation” in present day. Prerequisite: AUHIS 261 or consent of the instructor. AUHIS 368 History of Sport in Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the history of sport in Canadian society, from colonial times to the present. The course links developments in sport to wider changes in Canadian society and social relations. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 368 and AUPED 368. AUHIS 369 History of Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the history of Aboriginal Canada from the beginning of human occupation of what is now Canada to the present. Special attention is paid to the period after European contact, and to the relationship between Native peoples and the French, British, and Canadian governments. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261, consent of the instructor. AUHIS 372 History of Quebec Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A general history of Quebec from the French Regime to the present-day. Lectures and tutorials will place particular emphasis on the development of French Canadian nationalism, and the relationship between Quebec and Canada. Prerequisite: AUHIS 260 or 261. AUHIS 375 Canadian Environmental History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical examination of the dynamic interrelationships between the natural world and humans, with a focus on Canadian issues within a North American context. Topics and perspectives will include: Aboriginal peoples, colonization, fur trade, exploration, settlement, western agriculture, science, and the conservation movement. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 375, 475, AUENV 375, 475.

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AUHIS 271 The History of Women in Canadian Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). History of Canadian women from the seventeenth century to the present, looking at how Canadian women were affected by, and how they contributed to, changes in Canadian society. Corequisite: AUHIS 260 or 261 or consent of the instructor.

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AUHIS 378 Twentieth-Century Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Social, political, economic, and intellectual developments in twentieth-century Canada. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261, consent of the instructor. AUHIS 401 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of history as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUHIS 402 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of history as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUHIS 401 and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUHIS 416 Europe in the Sixteenth Century Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intellectual and social history of the Renaissance and Reformation. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in European history. AUHIS 425 Twentieth-Century Europe Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-0). Social, economic, national, intellectual, and military development of Europe from World War I to the end of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: Œ9 in European history. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 425 and 325. AUHIS 454 The United States Civil War Era, 1846 to 1877 Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Political, military, and socio-economic history of the United States Civil War: its causes, prosecution, and aftermath. Prerequisite: AUHIS 250. AUHIS 460 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 366, 369, 372, 378. AUHIS 461 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 366, 369, 372, 378. AUHIS 462 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 366, 369, 372, 378. AUHIS 463 Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Seminar course which deals with selected topics in Canadian history. Topics vary from year to year. They are announced before registration. Subjects are selected from, but not limited to, politics, labour, education, ideas, family, the legal system, regional issues, ethnicity. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 366, 369, 372, 378. AUHIS 467 The Collaborative Research Seminar: Selected Topics in Canadian History Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-0). This research seminar explores a field of Canadian history (to be determined by the professor). The course has three main components: critical reading and discussion of a specialized field of Canadian history writing, an historiographical research paper, as well as a collaborative research paper done from archival material and written jointly by members of the seminar. Prerequisites: AUHIS 260 and AUHIS 261. AUHIS 470 Selected Topics in Canadian Social History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Senior-level seminar for those already possessing a general knowledge of Canadian social history. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in Canadian history.

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Augustana Faculty Interdisciplinary Studies, AUIDS Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUIDS 110 Interdisciplinary Science Projects I Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 0-0-3/2). A project-based course that meets for three hours every two weeks in which students will work in teams on projects involving mathematics and at least one other science or social science discipline, including physics, chemistry, biology, environmental science, computing science, economics, sociology, psychology, kinesiology, and political studies. Corequisites: AUMAT 112, AUPHY 120. AUIDS 121 Introduction to Development Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the political, economic, literary, cultural, gender, and spiritual aspects of development work and to various development paradigms. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUIDS 121, 221 and AUSOC 218. AUIDS 160 Introduction to Crime, Correction, and Community Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to crime and correction in Canada. The theory and practice accompanying law enforcement, trial, correctional intervention, and probation and parole are analyzed by drawing from a range of disciplinary traditions such as ethical reflection, psychological theory, social and political thought, and biological understandings of criminality. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUIDS 160 and AUCRI 160. AUIDS 221 Introduction to Development Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the political, economic, literary, cultural, gender, and spiritual aspects of development work and to various development paradigms. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUIDS 121, 221 and AUSOC 218. AUIDS 230 Introduction to Women’s Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey and analysis of issues concerning women’s lives, both historically and in the present; an account of the development of feminist theories and critiques, and an assessment of the contribution this new scholarship has made in transforming perceived knowledge in a variety of disciplines. AUIDS 242 Introduction to Writing-Centre Practices Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 1.5-0-0). This course introduces students to the theories and practices of tutoring in a writing centre and helps them develop the practical skills required to become effective peer tutors at Augustana’s Writing Centre. These skills will be taught incrementally in a workshop setting that will reflect the working conditions of peer tutoring at a writing centre. In supervised mocktutoring sessions, students will help each other hone their writing and tutoring skills in preparation for their first peer-tutoring session. Eventually, students will begin undertaking actual tutoring sessions in the Writing Centre, under the supervision of the course instructor. Prerequisites: AUENG103, 104, and permission of the instructor. AUIDS 244 Introduction to Peer Tutoring and Second-Language Learning Practices in the Writing Centre Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 1.5-0-0). This course introduces students to the theoretical underpinnings of writing-centre practices, with a special focus on the area of tutoring ESL or Second Language (L2) learners. Students in this course will develop the practical skills required to become effective tutors for L2 learners in Augustana’s Writing Centre. These skills will be taught incrementally in a workshop setting that will reflect the working conditions of peer tutoring at a writing centre. In supervised mock-tutoring sessions during the fall term, students will help each other hone their writing and tutoring skills in preparation for their first peertutoring session. Eventually, students will undertake actual tutoring sessions in the Writing Centre, under the supervision of the course instructor. Prerequisites: AUENG103, AUENG104, and permission of the instructor.

AUHIS 475 Canadian Environmental History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical examination of the dynamic interrelationships between the natural world and humans, with a focus on Canadian issues within a North American context. Topics and perspectives will include: Aboriginal peoples, colonization, fur trade, exploration, settlement, western agriculture, science, and the conservation movement. Prerequisite: One of AUHIS 260, 261. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUHIS 375, 475, AUENV 375, 475.

AUIDS 270 Topics in Integrative Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected topics on the integration of knowledge between different disciplinary perspectives. The focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Each course is team-taught by faculty from at least two distinct disciplines. Note: Evennumbered courses in this series are classified as arts courses; odd-numbered courses are classified as science courses. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

AUHIS 480 The Historian’s Craft: Historiography Œ6 (fi 12) (variable, 3-0-0). How do historians do history? Problems of evidence, interpretation, methodologies, and various paradigms are investigated in the course as the student explores how historians research and write about the past. Prerequisite: Œ6 in History.

AUIDS 276 Topics in Integrative Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected topics on the integration of knowledge between different disciplinary perspectives. The focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Each course is team-taught by faculty from at least two distinct disciplines. Note: Even-

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University of Alberta

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AUIDS 278 Topics in Integrative Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 1.5-0-0). Selected topics on the integration of knowledge between different disciplinary perspectives. The focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Each course is team-taught by faculty from at least two distinct disciplines. Note: Evennumbered courses in this series are classified as arts courses; odd-numbered courses are classified as science courses. AUIDS 286 Selected Topics in Place-Based Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in place-based learning in specific off-campus locations. The focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and may vary from year to year. The course will take a specific place as the location and subject of study. The locations of study can be international or closer to home, but in all instances will encourage a significant engagement with the place. AUIDS 290 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in one of these courses. AUIDS 291 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in one of these courses. AUIDS 292 Integrative Studies (Cuba) Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). This is a mandatory course for all students attending the Augustana in Cuba program. The course will integrate various disciplinary considerations with the student’s experiences while living and studying for a semester in Cuba. Themes will include: Cuban society and culture, Cuba in a Latin American context, Cuba and the world. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUIDS 292 and AUSPA 250. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUIDS 378 Topics in Integrative Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 1.5-0-0). Selected topics on the integration of knowledge between different disciplinary perspectives. The focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. Each course is team-taught by faculty from at least two distinct disciplines. Note: Evennumbered courses in this series are classified as arts courses; odd-numbered courses are classified as science courses. AUIDS 386 Selected Topics in Place-Based Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, 0-3s-0). Selected topics in place-based learning in specific off-campus locations. The focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and may vary from year to year. The course will take a specific place as the location and subject of study. The locations of study can be international or closer to home, but in all instances will encourage a significant engagement with the place. AUIDS 390 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor; at least third-year standing or Œ3 at a senior level in Interdisciplinary Studies. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in one of these courses. AUIDS 391 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area to be defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor; at least third-year standing or Œ3 at a senior level in Interdisciplinary Studies. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in one of these courses.

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Augustana Faculty - Language Studies, AULAN Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AULAN 101 Introduction to Linguistic Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Central concepts of linguistics: linguistic categories and structure (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics). Notes: May not be taken by students with credit in AULAN 200 (2010).

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Augustana Faculty - Latin, AULAT Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AULAT 101 Beginners’ Latin I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). Introduction to the basic grammar and vocabulary of Latin. AULAT 102 Beginners’ Latin II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AULAT 101. Prerequisite: AULAT 101. AULAT 203 Intermediate Latin I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected readings in Latin literature. A review of Latin grammar. Prerequisite: AULAT 102. AULAT 204 Intermediate Latin II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected readings in Latin literature. Prose composition. Prerequisite: AULAT 203.

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Augustana Faculty - Management, AUMGT Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUMGT 100 Introduction to Business Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the competitive landscape of Canadian and Global businesses to provide students with the basic information about the different facets of business organizations. AUMGT 200 Introduction to Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the basic concepts of management. Topics include the origins of management, functional areas of management, levels of management structure, relationship between structure and function of the organization. Prerequisite: AUMGT 100. AUMGT 206 Mathematics in Economics and Finance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Mathematical analysis of problems arising in economics and finance, including an introduction to economic modelling, simple, compound, and continuous rates of interest; statics and comparative-static analysis; optimization; annuities, mortgages, bonds, and other securities; dynamics. Prerequisites: AUECO 101 and one of AUMAT 110, 111, 116. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMGT 206, AUECO 206, AUMAT 235. AUMGT 212 Business Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to Library research skills in the discipline of Business Studies. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in the Management Program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Management that requires library research. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMGT 212 and AUECO 212. The corequisite must be taken concurrently. AUMGT 310 Corporate Finance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the institutional environment of corporate finance. Topics include corporate financial analysis, planning and control, management of assets, time value of money, capital budgeting; short, medium, and long term financing; mergers, and reorganization/acquisitions. Prerequisites: AUSTA 153, AUACC 311 and AUMGT 200. AUMGT 320 Business Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines aspects of business/commercial law as it relates to business. Principles of law and its application to typical business situations are discussed. Prerequisites: AUMGT 200. AUMGT 323 Industrial Organization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration of various patterns of internal organization in industries, focusing on the relations among the structure, conduct, and performance of the industries. Prerequisite: AUECO 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMGT 323 and AUECO 323. AUMGT 330 Introduction to Marketing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the theory of marketing and its practice. The role of marketing within the business environment is discussed. Topics include the product design and management, national and international marketing strategies, consumer behaviour, product distribution and pricing, and market research. Prerequisites: AUMGT 200. AUMGT 340 Organizational Behaviour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of individuals and groups in an organizational setting. The course will help the student develop an understanding of the

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organizational behaviour concepts and the interaction between individual determinants of behaviour and group dynamics. Prerequisite: AUMGT 200. AUMGT 360 Hockey: Culture and Commerce Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the cultural and business aspects of the sport of hockey, historically and in the present. The course explores such topics as fan identities, cultural memory and tradition, race and ethnicity, gender and youth culture, labour relations and free agency, salary caps and revenue sharing, minor hockey, audiences and the mass media, fighting and violence, league expansion and franchise relocations, and arena construction. Prerequisites: AUMGT 200 or consent of the instructor, third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMGT 360 and AUPED 360. AUMGT 380 Selected Topics in Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers selected topics in Management. Topics may vary from year to year depending on the instructor and student interest. Prerequisites: AUMGT 200 or consent of instructor. Notes: Minimum third year standing. AUMGT 381 Selected Topics in Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers selected topics in Management. Topics may vary from year to year depending on the instructor and student interest. Prerequisites: AUMGT 200 or consent of instructor. Notes: Minimum third year standing. AUMGT 399 Management Internship Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-0). Students will combine work experience with academic study through the development and completion of an internship program related to management. As part of the internship, students are required to complete a major project related to their work. Prerequisites: AUMGT 200, third year standing and consent of the instructor.

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Calculus Placement Test should take AUMAT 116 instead of AUMAT 110. Students with unsatisfactory performance through the first four weeks of the course may be permitted to withdraw and register in the next offering of AUMAT 101. AUMAT 112 Elementary Calculus II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Fundamental Theorem, inverse trigonometric functions and their derivatives, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, techniques of integration, applications. Prerequisite: AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. AUMAT 116 Elementary Calculus I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Limits; differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions; Fundamental Theorem; indeterminate forms; applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1, Mathematics 31 and a grade of 80% or more on the Calculus Placement Test. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMAT 116, 110 and 111. AUMAT 120 Linear Algebra I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Vector and matrix algebra, determinants, linear systems of equations, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. AUMAT 211 Intermediate Calculus I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Infinite series, plane curves, polar coordinates, vectors and three-dimensional analytic geometry, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, elements of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: AUMAT 112. AUMAT 212 Intermediate Calculus II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, integration in two and three dimensions, vector functions, space curves, arc length, line integrals, Green’s theorem, surface integrals, Stokes’ theorem, the divergence theorem. Prerequisite: AUMAT 211.

AUMGT 422 Industrial Organization and Policy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of oligopoly theory, the economics of mergers and takeovers, competition policy, and industry regulation. Prerequisites: AUECO 203 and one of AUECO 323 and AUMGT 323. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMGT 422 and AUECO 422.

AUMAT 220 Linear Algebra II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Vector spaces, bases, linear transformations, change of bases, eigenvectors, characteristic polynomials, diagonalization, inner products and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, orthogonal and unitary operators. Prerequisites: AUMAT 120 and one of 110 or 111 or 116.

AUMGT 490 Business Policy and Strategy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Capstone course for the Management in Business Economics program. The course helps the student develop overall directions of an organization and mobilize human and other resources to accomplish strategic goals. The skills, concepts, and tools learned in various courses form the framework for making strategic decision. Prerequisite: Completion of all other courses in the Management Foundations, or consent of program adviser. Notes: Open only to a student in the Bachelor of Management in Business Economics Program.

AUMAT 229 Introduction to Group Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Groups as a measure of symmetry. Groups of rigid motions. Frieze groups, and finite groups in two and three dimensions. Groups of matrices. Group actions with application to counting problems. Permutation groups. Subgroups, cosets, and Lagrange’s Theorem. Quotient groups and homomorphisms. Prerequisites: AUMAT 120 and one of 110 or 111 or 116.

231.47

Augustana Faculty - Mathematics, AUMAT Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUMAT 101 Preparation for Calculus Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 2-0-0). Review of the mathematical background essential to success in Elementary Calculus I, as well as an introduction to some of the central concepts of calculus. Review topics include polynomials, rational expressions, exponents and logarithms, the real number line, the Cartesian plane, trigonometry, and functions and their graphs. Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1. Note: Normally offered as a nine-week course in the latter portion of the first term. Students with unsatisfactory performance through the first four weeks of AUMAT 110 may be permitted to withdraw from that course and register in the next offering of AUMAT 101. Students obtaining credit in in AUMAT 101 are strongly encouraged to attempt the next offering of AUMAT 110. Not open to students with credit in AUMAT 110, 111, or 116, and normally not open to a student with credit in Mathematics 31. The course does not count toward the major in Mathematics and Physics or the minor in Mathematics. AUMAT 107 Higher Arithmetic Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Elementary number theory, numeration systems, number systems, sets, logic, and elementary probability theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2, or consent of the instructor. Notes: The course does not count toward the major in Mathematics and Physics or the minor in Mathematics, nor may it be used for credit towards a B.Sc. degree. Credit may not be obtained for AUMAT 107 if credit has already been obtained for AUMAT 250. AUMAT 110 Elementary Calculus I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1.5s-0). Limits; differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMAT 110, 111 and 116. Students with credit in Mathematics 31 who score 80% or more on the

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AUMAT 235 Mathematics in Economics and Finance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Mathematical analysis of problems arising in economics and finance, including an introduction to economic modelling; simple, compound, and continuous rates of interest; static and comparative-static analysis; optimization; annuities, mortgages, bonds, and other securities; and dynamics. Prerequisites: AUECO 101 and one of AUMAT 110, 111, 116. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMAT 235, AUECO 206, AUMGT 206. AUMAT 250 Discrete Mathematics Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Sets, functions, elementary propositional and predicate logic, Boolean algebra, elementary graph theory, proof techniques (including induction and contradiction), and combinatorics. Prerequisites: AUMAT 110 or 111, or 116, and 120. AUMAT 260 Topics in Geometry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Axiomatic systems and finite geometries; Euclidean geometry and modern synthetic geometry, including Euclid’s and Hilbert’s axioms, Menelaus’ and Ceva’s theorems, the nine-point circle, and Morley’s theorem; constructions; isometries of the plane and groups of transformations; non-Euclidean geometry; applications. Prerequisite: AUMAT 120 or consent of the instructor. AUMAT 315 Complex Variables Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Complex numbers, functions of a complex variable, analytic functions, Cauchy and related theorems, Taylor and Laurent expansions, the residue calculus and applications, harmonic functions, conformal mapping, applications. Prerequisite: AUMAT 212. AUMAT 330 Ordinary Differential Equations Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). First- and higher-order equations; methods of solution, including complex variable techniques; series solutions; elementary transform techniques; oscillation theory; applications to biology and physics. Prerequisite: AUMAT 120, 211. AUMAT 332 Mathematical Ecology and Dynamical Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Mathematical analysis of problems associated with ecology, including models of population growth (e.g., discrete, continuous, agestructured, limited carrying capacity), the population dynamics of ecosystems, the spread of epidemics, the transport of pollutants, and the sustainable harvesting of vegetation and animal populations. Fundamental concepts of discrete and continuous dynamical systems, both linear and nonlinear. Prerequisites: AUMAT 120 and 211.

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AUMAT 355 Theory of Computing Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Models of computers including finite automata and Turing machines, computability, basics of formal languages with applications to the syntax of programming languages, unsolvable problems and their relevance to the semantics of programming, and concepts of computational complexity, including algorithm optimality. Prerequisite: AUCSC 112 and AUMAT 250. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMAT 355 and AUCSC 315. AUMAT 395 Directed Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Intensive study of a specific mathematical problem or other area of mathematics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Notes: Admission to AUMAT 395 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 on the major in Mathematics and Physics. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUMAT 480 History of Mathematics and Physics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Integrated history of mathematics and physics, emphasizing the scientific revolution and the subsequent development of mathematics and physics as distinct disciplines. Prerequisite: AUMAT 211 and one of AUMAT 220, 229, 250. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMAT 480, 380, AUPHY 380, 480. AUMAT 495 Directed Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Intensive study of a specific problem or area of mathematics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing. Notes: Admission to AUMAT 495 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 on the major in Mathematics and Physics. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

231.48

Augustana Faculty - Music, AUMUS Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUMUS 100 Introduction to Music Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Fundamentals of music, including notation, rudiments, and elementary harmonic progressions. Prerequisite: Completion of the Music Theory Placement Examination (MTPE) or consent of the instructor. Notes: The course is not open to a student scoring 70% or more on the MTPE. The course does not count toward any major, or minor in Music. AUMUS 127 Voice Class Œ2 (fi 4) (either term, 0-1.5L-0). Fundamental vocal and performance skills for those with little or no training. A weekly group lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A fee is assessed; group lesson rate applies. AUMUS 140 Augustana Choir Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor based on audition. Notes: a Œ1.5 course over the winter term. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 141 The Augustana Choir Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Notes: Not open to a part-time student who has less than one year of the degree program completed. A Œ3 course over the full year. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 142 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Notes: a Œ1 course over the fall term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 143 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ1 course over the winter term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student

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instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 144 Choral Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ2 course over the full year. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. AUMUS 145 Encore Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-3L-0). Performance of traditional chamber and vocal jazz music for small mixed choir including required participation in scheduled mini-tour(s) which may occur during spring break. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Corequisite: AUMUS 141. Note: A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 147 Chamber Ensemble Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Varies in constitution (e.g., voice and piano, woodwind trio, brass quartet) from year to year. The repertoire to be performed is decided by the students and instructor. The ensemble prepares and performs under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: An “Application for Chamber Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ3 course over the full year. AUMUS 149 Instrumental Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1.5L-0). Includes participation in all scheduled concert events. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: An “Application for Instrumental Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 160 Theoretical and Analytical Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of common-practice harmony: scales and modes, intervals, triads, figured bass, cadences, nonharmonic tones, harmonic progression and rhythm, part-writing, seventh chords, diatonic modulation. Prerequisites: AUMUS 100 or a score higher than 70% in the Music Theory Placement Examination (MTPE), and completion of the Keyboard Skills Interview (KSI). Corequisite: AUMUS 162. AUMUS 162 Aural and Sight Singing Skills I Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 2-1L-0). Development of listening and reading skills integral to the internalization of concepts covered in AUMUS 160. Prerequisites: AUMUS 100 or a score higher than 70% in the Music Theory Placement Examination (MTPE), and completion of the Keyboard Skills Interview (KSI). Corequisite: AUMUS 160. AUMUS 170 Tuning In: An Introduction to Music Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Development of listening approaches and techniques for understanding and appreciating a variety of Western and non-Western music, and an examination of the ideologies that prompt the sampling of such music. Music studied includes Western art music, African music, First Nations music, North Indian music, and popular music. AUMUS 188 Concerto Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a partial concerto or, for singers, a work or group of works normally performed with orchestra; one-hour weekly lesson offered over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: Restricted to Piano and Voice performance majors in their first year. A student should consult the Department of Fine Arts before registering. AUMUS 189 Service Playing Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private keyboard lessons in the playing of hymns and chants, liturgies, conducting from the keyboard, transcription, improvisations, and transposition; a half-hour lesson weekly over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to Liturgical Arts majors. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 190 Applied Music Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 191 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 192 Applied Music Œ1.5 (fi 5) (either term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a three-quarter-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 193 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (two term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a threequarter-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

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AUMAT 340 Numerical Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Computer arithmetic and errors, solution of systems of linear equations, root finding, interpolation, numerical quadrature, and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations. Applications from physics are included. Prerequisites: AUMAT 120, Corequisite AUMAT 211; or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMAT 340, AUCSC 340, AUPHY 340.

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AUMUS 194 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 195 Applied Music Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 196 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (first term, 0-2.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson in the fall term for a student exhibiting advanced abilities in music performance. Participation in group master classes is required. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. The following courses must be taken in consecutive fall/winter terms: AUMUS 196 and 197. AUMUS 197 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (second term, 0-2.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson in the winter term for a student exhibiting advanced abilities in music performance. Participation in group master classes is required. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. The following courses must be taken in consecutive fall/winter terms: AUMUS 196 and 197. AUMUS 198 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE), and to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 199 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE). A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 221 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). A selected topics course in music that may focus on a range of possible areas of study, from performance to musicology to conducting. This course may also include a tour component. Prerequisite(s): AUMUS 170 or permission of the instructor. AUMUS 223 Music of the Caribbean Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Study of selected musical traditions within the Caribbean. How musical styles are shaped by their interactions with language, religion, economy, other arts, and the whole fabric of social life are explored. Prerequisite: AUMUS 170 or consent of the instructor. Note: The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program. AUMUS 224 Medieval and Renaissance Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of Western European art music through the medieval and Renaissance periods. Prerequisite: AUMUS 170 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 225 Baroque and Classical Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of Western European art music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in the context of general cultural history. Prerequisite: AUMUS 170 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 226 Romantic and Twentieth-Century Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Music from early Romanticism to the present. Both musicological and interdisciplinary analytical approaches are emphasized. Prerequisite: AUMUS 170 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 227 History of Vocal Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of vocal literature from the seventeenth century to the present. AUMUS 228 Music Studies and Information Literacy Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 1.5-0-0). Introduction to music research skills by a librarian with a graduate degree in Library and Information Studies. The course examines on-line catalogues, periodical indexes, the internet, general research skills, traditional library resources, style manuals, bibliography creation, plagiarism, and evolving technological issues in research. Implementing critical thinking skills to gain access to, evaluate, and use information is emphasized. Prerequisite: Second-year status in a Music degree program or consent of the instructor. Corequisite: Any senior course in Music that requires library research. Note: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. AUMUS 229 History of Piano Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of piano literature from the seventeenth century to the present.

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AUMUS 235 Introduction to Conducting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Fundamental conducting techniques as applied to instrumental and vocal music. Prerequisite: AUMUS 160 and 162, or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 236 Introduction to Choral Techniques, Literature, and Interpretation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to choral techniques, interpretation, and choral literature. Prerequisite: AUMUS 235 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 238 Piano Pedagogy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Principles, methods, and techniques for teaching piano with a survey of various pedagogical schools of thought. Prerequisite: AUMUS 160 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 239 Vocal Pedagogy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-1L-0). Comprehensive study of the voice and how it functions, survey of current methods, and supervised practical instruction. Prerequisite: Applied music in voice at the 200 level, or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 240 Augustana Choir Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor based on audition. Notes: a Œ1.5 course over the winter term. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 241 The Augustana Choir Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Notes: Not open to a part-time student who has less than one year of the degree program completed. A Œ3 course over the full year. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 242 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Notes: a Œ1 course over the fall term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 243 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ1 course over the winter term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 244 Choral Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ2 course over the full year. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. AUMUS 245 Encore Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-3L-0). Performance of traditional chamber and vocal jazz music for small mixed choir including required participation in scheduled mini-tour(s) which may occur during spring break. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Corequisite: AUMUS 241. Note: A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 249 Instrumental Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1.5L-0). Includes participation in all scheduled concert events. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: An “Application for Instrumental Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 260 Theoretical and Analytical Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of the study of common-practice harmony, including secondary dominants, borrowed chords, chromatic and enharmonic modulations, and extended chords. Prerequisite: AUMUS 160. Corequisite: AUMUS 262. AUMUS 261 Theoretical and Analytical Studies III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of common-practice harmony, including Neapolitan sixths, augmented sixths, altered dominants, and chromatically altered chords; modulations to foreign keys and third-relation harmony; polychords, modal mixture, and extended chromaticism. Prerequisite: AUMUS 260. Corequisite: AUMUS 263. AUMUS 262 Aural and Sight Singing Skills II Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 2-1L-0). Development of listening and reading skills integral to the internalization of concepts covered in AUMUS 260. Prerequisite: AUMUS 162. Corequisite: AUMUS 260.

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AUMUS 265 Introduction to Composition Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-1.5L-0). Exploration, through written exercises and assignments, of the development of compositional systems, processes, and techniques related to twentieth-century musical idioms. Prerequisite: AUMUS 160 or consent of the instructor. Note: A Œ3 course offered over the full year. AUMUS 270 Liturgical Arts I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to ritual and its role within Christian celebration. An examination of the liturgical year, liturgies and hymns, contemporary styles of worship, ecumenism, cultural diversity, inclusive language, instruments in the service, and professional concerns of the church musician. Current rural, urban, English, French, multicultural, and First Nations communities are addressed, including their respective histories and futures within Canada. Projects include the designing of liturgies and composing of music for diverse communities. Prerequisite: AUMUS 260 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 271 Liturgical Arts II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of topics and projects introduced in AUMUS 270. Prerequisite: AUMUS 270. AUMUS 288 Concerto Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a partial concerto or, for singers, a work or group of works normally performed with orchestra; one-hour weekly lesson offered over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: Restricted to Piano and Voice performance majors in their second year. A student should consult the Department of Fine Arts before registering. AUMUS 289 Service Playing Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private keyboard lessons in the playing of hymns and chants, liturgies, conducting from the keyboard, transcription, improvisations, and transposition; a half-hour lesson weekly over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to Liturgical Arts majors. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 290 Applied Music Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 291 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 292 Applied Music Œ1.5 (fi 5) (either term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a three-quarter-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 293 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (two term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a threequarter-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 294 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

AUMUS 298 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE), and to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 299 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE). A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 320 Music and the Canadian Identity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Critical examination of four centuries of ways in which Canadians identify “themselves” and relate to “others”, as revealed through music and other artifacts of music making. Traditional musicological perspectives are integrated with those from ethnomusicology and post-colonial studies. Art music, country, pop, folk, and First Nations music in Canada are examined. Prerequisite: AUMUS 361 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 321 Music and Gender Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Criticism of Western art music has undergone a profound change as new modes of critical thought reveal new areas of meaning in the traditional repertoire. Well-known examples of Western art music and of issues related to this tradition are examined through the perspectives of feminist theory and queer theory (gay and lesbian studies). Prerequisite: AUMUS 170 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 322 Rethinking Music: From Mozart to Madonna Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to current issues in musicological thought. The course examines traditional ways of thinking about music, and considers issues such as the role of the symbol in language and music, cultural studies, ethnomusicology, the scholarly devaluation of popular music, feminist theory, and analyses of rock videos. Prerequisite: Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. Note: Students from a variety of musical backgrounds (popular or classical) are encouraged to enrol. AUMUS 327 History of Vocal Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of vocal literature from the seventeenth century to the present. AUMUS 329 History of Piano Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of piano literature from the seventeenth century to the present. AUMUS 330 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 331 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 1.5-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor.

AUMUS 295 Applied Music Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

AUMUS 332 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor.

AUMUS 296 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (either term, 0-2.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson in the fall term for a student exhibiting advanced abilities in music performance. Participation in group master classes is required. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. The following courses must be taken in consecutive fall/winter terms: AUMUS 296 and 297.

AUMUS 333 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor.

AUMUS 297 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (either term, 0-2.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson in the winter term for a student exhibiting advanced abilities in music performance. Participation in group master classes is required. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. The following courses must be taken in consecutive fall/winter terms: AUMUS 296 and 297.

AUMUS 334 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor.

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A Course Listings

AUMUS 263 Aural and Sight Singing Skills III Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 2-1L-0). Development of listening and reading skills integral to the internalization of concepts covered in AUMUS 261. Prerequisites: AUMUS 260 and 262. Corequisite: AUMUS 261.

563

Course Listings A

564

University of Alberta

AUMUS 335 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to the theory, history and practise within a music performance discipline. Prerequisites: Second year standing. AUMUS 336 Advanced Conducting Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continued development of conducting techniques as applied to choral music. Prerequisite: AUMUS 235. AUMUS 337 Choral Conducting Summer Intensive: A Holistic Approach Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, 0-3s-0). A holistic approach to choral conducting that embraces all facets of choral direction, including body awareness and exploration, vocal development and technique, conducting technique, score reading and analysis, musicianship, choral pedagogy, repertoire and rehearsal techniques. Ample opportunity is provided for individual attention as well as group dialogue and discussion. Participants conduct a resident lab choir on a daily basis. Prerequisite: AUMUS 336 or consent of the department. AUMUS 339 Vocal Pedagogy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-1L-0). Comprehensive study of the voice and how it functions, survey of current methods, and supervised practical instruction. Prerequisite: Applied music in voice at the 200 level, or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 340 Augustana Choir Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor based on audition. Notes: a Œ1.5 course over the winter term. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 341 The Augustana Choir Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Notes: Not open to a part-time student who has less than one year of the degree program completed. A Œ3 course over the full year. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 342 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Notes: a Œ1 course over the fall term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 343 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ1 course over the winter term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 344 Choral Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ2 course over the full year. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. AUMUS 345 Encore Œ2 (fi 4) (either term, 0-3L-0). Performance of traditional chamber and vocal jazz music for small mixed choir including required participation in scheduled mini-tour(s) which may occur during spring break. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Corequisite: AUMUS 341. Note: A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 347 Chamber Ensemble Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Varies in constitution (e.g., voice and piano, woodwind trio, brass quartet) from year to year. The repertoire to be performed is decided by the students and instructor. The ensemble prepares and performs under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Division. Notes: An “Application for Chamber Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ3 course over the full year. AUMUS 349 Instrumental Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1.5L-0). Includes participation in all scheduled concert events. Prerequisite: Consent of the Division. Notes: An “Application for Instrumental Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 361 Form, Analysis, and the Construction of Musical Meaning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of music through harmonic, contrapuntal and structural analysis of selected pieces from the Baroque to Romantic periods. Includes the examination of prominent musical features and harmonic devices within common small- and large-scale forms. Offers a critique of the applications and limitations of conventional musical analysis. Prerequisite: AUMUS 261.

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AUMUS 367 Critical Discourse and the Fine Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to Theory and the Fine Arts. A critical study of historical and contemporary issues in the fine arts with an emphasis on themes common to the disciplines of drama, music and the visual arts as cultural processes. Discussions of various theoretical positions including critical and cultural theory, aesthetic theory, disciplinary history and a history of criticism. Prerequisite: Third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMUS 367, 467, AUART 367, 467, AUDRA 367, 467. AUMUS 368 Ethnomusicology: Issues and Concepts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to the discipline of ethnomusicology through the exploration of various related issues, theories and methodologies in regard to “world” and popular music. Topics may include fieldwork methodologies and issues, music and identity, definitions of “tradition”, issues of representation and appropriation, music and place, transmission processes, music and gender, the relationship of music to spiritual practices, the impact of contemporary recording technologies, and the intersections of musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology. Prerequisites: AUMUS 170 and third-year standing or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 369 Retheorizing Music: From Modernism to Postmodernism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Examination of technical and stylistic perspectives from Modernist art music techniques established before 1950 to those found in art, popular, and world music in the twenty-first century. Included are exercises in composition and performance as well as training in related listening, sight singing, and score-reading skills. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and 263. AUMUS 375 Co-op Education Studies I Œ1.5 (fi 3) (variable, 1-3.5L-0). Placement of a student with an employer organization for work experience. The practicum is designed by the student, supervising faculty member, and supervising organizational director, to integrate the liberal arts study of music with work experience in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, and the professions. Prerequisites: Third-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Co-op Education Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUMUS 376 Directed Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Individual research project in a specific area of study as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Thirdor fourth-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUMUS 388 Concerto Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a complete concerto or, for singers, a work or group of works normally performed with orchestra; one-hour weekly lesson offered over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: Restricted to Piano and Voice performance majors in their third year. A student should consult the Department of Fine Arts before registering. AUMUS 389 Service Playing Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private keyboard lessons in the playing of hymns and chants, liturgies, conducting from the keyboard, transcription, improvisations, and transposition; a half-hour lesson weekly over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to Liturgical Arts majors. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 390 Applied Music Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 391 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 392 Applied Music Œ1.5 (fi 5) (either term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a three-quarter-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 393 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (two term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a threequarter-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 394 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

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University of Alberta

AUMUS 396 Performance Studies I Œ3 (fi 8) (variable, 0-3L-0). Formal recital (minimum duration: 45 minutes) prepared under the guidance of the instructor and marked by a jury. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Corequisite: AUMUS 395. AUMUS 397 Applied Music Œ7 (fi 16) (two term, 0-2L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a formal recital (minimum duration: 45 minutes) prepared under the guidance of the instructor and marked by a jury. Participation in group master classes is required. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: This course is restricted to Liturgical Arts, Musical Arts, Piano, and Voice majors in the Bachelor of Music program. AUMUS 398 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE), and to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 399 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE). A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 420 Music and the Canadian Identity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Critical examination of four centuries of ways in which Canadians identify “themselves” and relate to “others”, as revealed through music and other artifacts of music making. Traditional musicological perspectives are integrated with those from ethnomusicology and post-colonial studies. Art music, country, pop, folk, and First Nations music in Canada are examined. Prerequisite: AUMUS 361 or consent of instructor. AUMUS 421 Music and Gender Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Criticism of Western art music has undergone a profound change as new modes of critical thought reveal new areas of meaning in the traditional repertoire. Well-known examples of Western art music and of issues related to this tradition are examined through the perspectives of feminist theory and queer theory (gay and lesbian studies). Prerequisite: AUMUS 170 or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 422 Rethinking Music: From Mozart to Madonna Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to current issues in musicological thought. The course examines traditional ways of thinking about music, and considers issues such as the role of the symbol in language and music, cultural studies, ethnomusicology, the scholarly devaluation of popular music, feminist theory, and analyses of rock videos. Prerequisite: Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. Note: Students from a variety of musical backgrounds (popular or classical) are encouraged to enrol. AUMUS 430 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 431 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 1.5-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 432 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 433 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers,

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audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 434 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 435 Selected Topics in Music Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected topics related to music history, music theory, and ethnomusicology. Topics vary from year to year and may include such diverse areas as world music, cultural and critical theory, popular music, music video, jazz, Eurowestern style periods, genres, composers, performers, audiences, set theory, and Schenkarian analysis. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and Œ6 from AUMUS 224, 225, 226; or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 440 Augustana Choir Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor based on audition. Notes: a Œ1.5 course over the winter term. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 441 The Augustana Choir Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Notes: Not open to a part-time student who has less than one year of the degree program completed. A Œ3 course over the full year. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 442 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Notes: A Œ1 course over the fall term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 443 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ1 course over the winter term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 444 Choral Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ2 course over the full year. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. AUMUS 445 Encore Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-3L-0). Performance of traditional chamber and vocal jazz music for small mixed choir including required participation in scheduled mini-tour(s) which may occur during spring break. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Corequisite: AUMUS 441. Note: A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 447 Chamber Ensemble Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Varies in constitution (e.g., voice and piano, woodwind trio, brass quartet) from year to year. The repertoire to be performed is decided by the students and instructor. The ensemble prepares and performs under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: An “Application for Chamber Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ3 course over the full year. AUMUS 449 Instrumental Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1.5L-0). Includes participation in all scheduled concert events. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: An “Application for Instrumental Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ2 course over the full year. AUMUS 467 Critical Discourse and the Fine Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to Theory and the Fine Arts. A critical study of historical and contemporary issues in the fine arts with an emphasis on themes common to the disciplines of drama, music and the visual arts as cultural processes. Discussions of various theoretical positions including critical and cultural theory, aesthetic theory, disciplinary history and a history of criticism. Prerequisite: Third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMUS 367, 467, AUART 367, 467, AUDRA 367, 467. AUMUS 468 Ethnomusicology: Issues and Concepts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Introduction to the discipline of ethnomusicology

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A Course Listings

AUMUS 395 Applied Music Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

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Course Listings A

566

University of Alberta

through the exploration of various related issues, theories and methodologies in regard to “world” and popular music. Topics may include fieldwork methodologies and issues, music and identity, definitions of “tradition”, issues of representation and appropriation, music and place, transmission processes, music and gender, the relationship of music to spiritual practices, the impact of contemporary recording technologies, and the intersections of musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology. Prerequisites: AUMUS 170 and third-year standing or consent of the instructor. AUMUS 469 Retheorizing Music: From Modernism to Postmodernism Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Examination of technical and stylistic perspectives from Modernist art music techniques established before 1950 to those found in art, popular, and world music in the twenty-first century. Included are exercises in composition and performance as well as training in related listening, sight singing, and score-reading skills. Prerequisites: AUMUS 261 and 263. AUMUS 475 Co-op Education Studies II Œ1.5 (fi 3) (variable, 1-3.5L-0). Placement of a student with an employer organization for work experience. The practicum is designed by the student, supervising faculty member, and supervising organizational director to integrate the liberal arts study of music with work experience in appropriate fields of business, industry, government, and the professions. Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An Application for Co-op Education Study must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUMUS 476 Directed Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Individual research project in a specific area of study as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUMUS 376 and consent of the instructor. Note: An Application for Individual Study must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUMUS 488 Concerto Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a complete concerto or, for singers, a work or group of works normally performed with orchestra; one-hour weekly lesson offered over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: Restricted to Piano and Voice performance majors in their fourth year. A student should consult the Department of Fine Arts before registering. AUMUS 489 Service Playing Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private keyboard lessons in the playing of hymns and chants, liturgies, conducting from the keyboard, transcription, improvisations, and transposition; a half-hour lesson weekly over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to Liturgical Arts majors. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 490 Applied Music Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 491 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 492 Applied Music Œ1.5 (fi 5) (either term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a three-quarter-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

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master classes is required. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: This course is restricted to Liturgical Arts, Musical Arts, Piano, and Voice majors in the Bachelor of Music program. AUMUS 498 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE), and to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 499 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE), and to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 540 Augustana Choir Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor based on audition. Notes: a Œ1.5 course over the winter term. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 541 Augustana Choir Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-4.5L-0). Performance of choral music for mixed choir, including required participation in a performance tour which may follow the winter term. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Notes: A Œ3 course over the full year. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 542 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Notes: a Œ1 course over the fall term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 543 Choral Ensemble Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ1 course over the winter term. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUMUS 544 Choral Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-2L-0). Performance of choral music. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: A Œ2 course over the full year. The course does not require participation in a performance tour. AUMUS 545 Encore Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-3L-0). Performance of traditional chamber and vocal jazz music for small mixed choir including required participation in scheduled mini-tour(s) which may occur during spring break. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor, based on audition. Corequisite: AUMUS 541. Note: A Œ2 course over the full year.

AUMUS 493 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (two term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a threequarter-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

AUMUS 547 Chamber Ensemble Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Varies in constitution (e.g., voice and piano, woodwind trio, brass quartet) from year to year. The repertoire to be performed is decided by the students and instructor. The ensemble prepares and performs under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: An “Application for Chamber Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ3 course over the full year.

AUMUS 494 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

AUMUS 549 Instrumental Ensemble Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1.5L-0). Includes participation in all scheduled concert events. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: An “Application for Instrumental Ensemble Studies” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. A Œ2 course over the full year.

AUMUS 495 Applied Music Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

AUMUS 588 Concerto Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a complete concerto or, for singers, a work or group of works normally performed with orchestra; one-hour weekly lesson offered over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: Restricted to Piano and Voice performance majors in their fifth year. A student should consult the Department of Fine Arts before registering.

AUMUS 496 Performance Studies II Œ3 (fi 8) (variable, 0-3L-0). Formal recital (minimum duration: 60 minutes) prepared under the guidance of the instructor and marked by a jury. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Corequisite: AUMUS 495. AUMUS 497 Applied Music Œ7 (fi 16) (two term, 0-2L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a formal recital (minimum duration: 60 minutes) prepared under the guidance of the instructor and marked by a jury. Participation in group

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AUMUS 590 Applied Music Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

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University of Alberta

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AUPHI 210 Epistemology: Theories of Knowledge Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of such central topics in epistemology as foundationalism, truth and rationality, skepticism and the limits of knowledge, relativism and the objectivity of knowledge, evidence and verifiability, and belief and justification.

AUMUS 592 Applied Music Œ1.5 (fi 5) (either term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a three-quarter-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

AUPHI 226 Existentialism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the main themes and perspectives in recent existential philosophy. Authors such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Heidegger Mounier, and Camus may be considered. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 226 and AUPHI 326 (2013).

AUMUS 593 Applied Music Œ3 (fi 8) (two term, 0-0.75L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a threequarter-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

AUPHI 228 Philosophy Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Philosophy. Prerequisite: Second year standing in a Philosophy and Religion degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Philosophy that requires library research. Notes: The corequisites must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 228, AUART 228, AUHIS 285, AUREL 228.

AUMUS 594 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 595 Applied Music Œ4 (fi 10) (two term, 0-1L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a one-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 596 Performance Studies II Œ3 (fi 8) (either term, 0-3L-0). Formal recital (minimum duration: 60 minutes) prepared under the guidance of the instructor and marked by a jury. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Corequisite: AUMUS 595. AUMUS 597 Applied Music Œ7 (fi 16) (two term, 0-2L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice and the presentation of a formal recital (minimum duration: 60 minutes) prepared under the guidance of the instructor and marked by a jury. Participation in group master classes is required. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Note: This course is restricted to Liturgical Arts, Musical Arts, Piano, and Voice majors in the Bachelor of Music program. AUMUS 598 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ1 (fi 4) (either term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE), and to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering. AUMUS 599 Fundamental Keyboard Skills Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private piano lessons; a half-hour weekly lesson over two terms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to students who want to develop specific skills required to pass the Keyboard Skills Proficiency Examination (KSPE), and to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

231.49

Augustana Faculty - Philosophy, AUPHI

AUPHI 240 Ancient Political Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical survey of the development of political and social philosophy, focusing on classical Greece and Rome. Authors studied will include Plato and Aristotle. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 210 and AUPHI 240. AUPHI 241 Modern Political Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical and critical survey of the political ideas of modern Europe, from the end of the Renaissance to the end of the 19th century. Authors studied may include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft and Marx. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 211 and AUPHI 241. AUPHI 250 History of Christian Thought Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the history of Christian thought from its Judaic and Hellenistic origins up to and including the twentieth century. AUPHI 260 Ethics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of questions of right and wrong, good and evil, and reasons for action, through study of ethical theories of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Mill. AUPHI 290 Philosophy of Contemporary Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigation of contemporary culture, both “popular” and “literate” (film, theatre, music, writing). AUPHI 311 Ancient Greek Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of ancient Greek philosophy from its origins with the Pre-Socratics up to and including Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisites: AUPHI 101 and 102 preferred, but not necessary. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 311 and AUCLA 310. AUPHI 320 Hermeneutics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the philosophical theories about the nature of interpretation and understanding. Themes and texts are selected from the writings of Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Foucault, Deleuze, and others. Themes may include our relationship to authors, to sacred texts, and to nature. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 320 and AUPHI 420 (2013).

Undergraduate Courses

AUPHI 325 Phenomenology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the phenomenological method, its history in the twentieth-century, and its contemporary possibilities. Themes and texts are selected from the writings of Husserl as well as from those of Heidegger, Schütz, Stein, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Patocka , Young, and others. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 325 and AUPHI 425 (2013).

AUPHI 101 Introduction to Western Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the main problems and theories that have dominated philosophical thought, through study and critical discussion of selected classics of ancient and medieval philosophy.

AUPHI 336 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Main currents of thought of the nineteenth century and the ideological conflicts that our own age has inherited from its predecessors. Particular attention is given to the social and political aspects of the philosophical systems of Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Darwin, and Nietzsche.

AUPHI 102 Introduction to Western Philosophy II: Modern Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of an introduction to the main problems and theories that have dominated philosophical thought, through study and critical discussions of selected classics of modern philosophy.

AUPHI 340 Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the major formulations and problems of Western social and political thought in the twentieth and twenty-first century, dealing with topics ranging from governance to social relationships. Prerequisite: AUPHI 240 or 241, or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 310, 410 (2010) and AUPHI 340.

Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

AUPHI 180 Critical Thinking Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Elementary methods and principles for distinguishing correct from incorrect reasoning. Topics may include informal fallacies, introduction to the scientific method, elementary formal logic, rational decision procedures, and analysis of arguments. AUPHI 200 Metaphysics: Theories of Reality Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of traditional and contemporary topics such as Being and Nonbeing, the nature of time, freedom, appearance and reality, persons, and the mind-body problem.

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AUPHI 345 Philosophy in Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of texts by historical or contemporary philosophical figures in Canada, centred on a chosen theme, in relation to the Canadian cultural and institutional context, and drawing from a multidisciplinary perspective on philosophy. AUPHI 350 Philosophy of Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Philosophical approach to the presuppositions,

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A Course Listings

AUMUS 591 Applied Music Œ2 (fi 6) (two term, 0-0.5L-0). Private lessons in instrument or voice; a threequarter-hour weekly lesson over one term. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department. Notes: Restricted to International Program students. A student should consult the Fine Arts Department before registering.

Course Listings A

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attitudes, language, practices, and goals of the physical and social sciences. Topics may include theory evaluation, explanation, and the nature of scientific law. AUPHI 355 Philosophy and the Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigation of the philosophical and social issues related to technology and the environment. Topics may include the natural/artificial distinction, different meanings of “environment”, the ways we understand, package, and manage nature as well as issues in environmental ethics and aesthetics. May include texts by Western and Indigenous thinkers. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 355 and AUENV 355. AUPHI 357 Philosophy of Religion I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the philosophy of religion by focusing on the question, “What is religion?” Through lectures, discussion, and reading of such thinkers as Schleiermacher, Feuerbach, Kierkegaard, and Otto, the course explores the concept of religion; the existence of God (and related proofs); meaning in religious language; and the relations between faith and reason, philosophy and religion. Prerequisite: None, but AUPHI 102 or 336 would be useful. AUPHI 358 Philosophy of Religion II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Continuation of the exploration of religion and religious experience undertaken in AUPHI 357. Consideration is given to various forms of spirituality as found in the writings of Christian and non-Christian mystics and religious thinkers such as Eckhart, Shankara, and Starhawk. Prerequisite: AUPHI 357 or consent of the instructor. AUPHI 365 Aesthetics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Considerations of theoretical issues related to visual arts, broadly understood and of sense experience. AUPHI 366 Place and Space Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigation of concepts, experiences and representations of place and space through the study of philosophical texts and other relevant sources. AUPHI 392 World Philosophy: Comparing Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of philosophy as it takes place outside Europe and North America and outside the Western canon. Topics may include: relationship between philosophy, culture, and spirituality; tradition; reason; language; communitarianism and individualism; nonduality; colonialism; government and power; as well as topics proper to local philosophical traditions. Geographical areas covered vary from year to year. AUPHI 422 Philosophy, Religion and Public Life Research Seminar I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Preparation of a literature review, research proposal, and presentation of a public life issue that will be explored from philosophical and/or religious perspectives. Research may be participatory archival, or community based. It may include a community service learning component. Classes provide supportive and critical analysis throughout the student’s work and research process. Prerequisite: Third or fourth-year standing. Notes: Open only to students with a major in Philosophy and Religion. This course can be taken only by a student who is also registered in AUPHI 423. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 422 and AUREL 432. AUPHI 423 Philosophy, Religion and Public Life Research Seminar II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Continuation of AUPHI 422. This course involves implementing research, presentation of results, and a final writing project. Research may be participatory, archival, or community based. Classes provide supportive and critical analysis throughout the student’s work and research process. Prerequisites: AUPHI 422; third or fourth-year standing. Note: Open only to students with a major in Philosophy and Religion. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 423 and AUREL 433. AUPHI 459 Philosophy of Western Mysticism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the mystic tradition in the West, including Plotinus, Pseudo-Dionysius, Bonaventure, Eckhart and the Rhineland mystics, Jacob Boehme, and the Kaballah. On the basis of these sources, questions such as the following are addressed: What is the nature of mystical experience? What is mystical “knowledge”? Is mysticism rational? Are there types of mysticism? How can mysticism and morality be related? Prerequisite: AUPHI 357 or consent of the instructor. AUPHI 490 Selected Topics in the History of Philosophy I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth study of a theme, philosopher, philosophical movement, or philosophical period. Prerequisite: AUPHI 102 or consent of the instructor. AUPHI 491 Selected Topics in the History of Philosophy II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth study of a theme, philosopher, philosophical movement, or philosophical period. Prerequisite: AUPHI 102 or consent of the instructor. AUPHI 492 Selected Topics in the History of Philosophy III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth study of a theme, philosopher, philosophical movement, or philosophical period. Prerequisite: AUPHI 102 or consent of the instructor.

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AUPHI 493 Selected Topics in the History of Philosophy IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth study of a theme, philosopher, philosophical movement, or philosophical period. Prerequisite: AUPHI 102 or consent of the instructor. AUPHI 495 Directed Studies I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Philosophy as defined by a student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ9 at a senior level in Philosophy and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPHI 496 Directed Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Philosophy as defined by a student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ9 at a senior level in Philosophy and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPHI 497 Directed Studies III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Philosophy as defined by a student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ9 at a senior level in Philosophy and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

231.50

Augustana Faculty - Physical Activity, AUPAC Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Note: Augustana Faculty AUPAC courses are not equivalent to PAC courses offered in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation in credit value or hours of instruction and thus may not be applicable to degree programs offered by that Faculty.

Undergraduate Courses AUPAC 102 Golf Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). An introduction to the fundamental skills (driving, iron play, chipping, pitching and putting) and rules of golf. AUPAC 103 Tennis Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 109 Cross-Country Skiing Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-3L-0). Note: Not open to students with credit in AUPED 107 or 108. AUPAC 114 Dance Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 123 Aquatics Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 124 Badminton Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 125 Canoeing Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). Note: Not open to students with credit in AUPAC 226. AUPAC 131 Curling Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-3L-0). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPAC 131 and AUPED 109. AUPAC 133 Strength Training Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 134 Indoor Climbing Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 151 Track and Field Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 152 Luge Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 161 Gymnastics Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 171 Indoor Soccer Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). An introduction to the fundamental skills and rules of indoor soccer. AUPAC 173 Football Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 175 Ice Hockey Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). An introduction to the fundamental skills, tactics and rules of ice hockey. Notes: In order to register for this course, a student

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AUPAC 177 Soccer Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 178 Basketball Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPAC 178 and AUPED 106. AUPAC 179 Volleyball Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 180 Softball (Fast Pitch) Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 181 Team Handball Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 191 Selected Topics in Physical Activity Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). An introduction to selected physical activities. AUPAC 192 Selected Topics in Physical Activity Œ2 (fi 4) (either term, 0-3L-0). An introduction to selected physical activities. AUPAC 193 Selected Topics in Physical Activity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3L-0). An introduction to selected physical activities. AUPAC 209 Advanced Cross-Country Skiing Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 109. Note: Not open to students with credit in AUPED 207 or 208. AUPAC 224 Advanced Badminton Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 124. AUPAC 225 Advanced Canoeing Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 125. AUPAC 226 Moving Water Canoeing: Skill Development Œ3 (fi 6) (spring/summer, 0-3L-0). Corequisite: AUPED 286. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPAC 226 and AUPAC 326. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUPAC 253 Advanced Luge Œ1 (fi 2) (second term, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 152. AUPAC 270 Adventure Games Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). AUPAC 271 Advanced Indoor Soccer Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of team offence and defence, team play, rules of play and officiating. Prerequisite: AUPAC 171. AUPAC 277 Advanced Soccer Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 177. AUPAC 278 Advanced Basketball Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 178. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPAC 278 and AUPED 206. AUPAC 279 Advanced Volleyball Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 179. AUPAC 291 Selected Topics in Physical Activity Œ1 (fi 1) (either term, 0-3L-0). Advanced study and practice of selected physical activities. Prerequisite: Second-year standing: variable according to activity. AUPAC 292 Selected Topics in Physical Activity Œ2 (fi 4) (either term, 0-3L-0). Advanced study and practice of selected physical activities. Prerequisite: Second-year standing: variable according to activity. AUPAC 293 Selected Topics in Physical Activity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3L-0). Advanced study and practice of selected physical activities. Prerequisite: Second-year standing: variable according to activity. AUPAC 326 Moving Water Canoeing: Skill and Instructional Development Œ3 (fi 6) (spring/summer, 0-3L-0). Prerequisite: AUPAC 125 or AUPED 184 or consent of instructor. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPAC 226 or 326.

231.51

Augustana Faculty - Physical Education, AUPED Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. 

AUPED 112 Structural Human Anatomy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-2). Study of structure and function of selected systems of the human body (skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and others). AUPED 160 Sociocultural Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the sociocultural dimensions of sport and physical activity. The course examines a variety of social institutions, processes, issues, and their relationship to sport and physical education in Canada and the United States. Topics include the emergence of modern sport, sport and culture, socialization, class and gender relations, race and ethnicity, government and politics, commercialization, the mass media, schools and universities, drugs and violence. AUPED 184 Introduction to Outdoor Education Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Opportunity for self-awareness and personal and group leadership development through outdoor tripping and small-group living. The skills associated with backpacking, river canoe tripping, and Leave No Trace camping are developed and practised. In addition, educational and recreational use of wilderness and wildlands is examined. Notes: The course requires participation in field trips. A student must furnish his or her own outdoor clothing, footwear, and sleeping bag. Additional fees may be assessed. AUPED 185 Introduction to Ski Touring Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Course includes a 1 week expedition. Opportunity for self-awareness and leadership development through outdoor tripping and small-group living. The students will learn skills associated with ski touring, traveling in avalanche terrain, telemark skiing, and Leave No Trace camping. Students will have an opportunity to obtain Canadian Avalanche Association Avalanche Safety Training level one certification. Prerequisites: One of AUPED 184 or 286 and successful completion of a ski competency test. Notes: A student must demonstrate basic competency in skiing (downhill or cross-country). The course requires participation in field trips. A student must furnish his or her own outdoor clothing and sleeping bag. Credit can be received for only one of AUPED 185 and AUPED 285. AUPED 215 Introduction to Human Physiology I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the function of the human body from the cellular to systemic level. All systems will be examined and will include those that meet changing energy demands during physical activity. Prerequisite: AUPED 112. AUPED 216 Introduction to Human Physiology II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A continuation of AUPED 215. Prerequisite: AUPED 215. AUPED 220 Human Growth and Development Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the sequential changes in physical growth and motor development with emphasis on individual differences. AUPED 222 Introduction to Movement Activities of Youth (Ages 5 - 12) Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of a variety of movement activities, including play, games, gymnastics, and dance, in which children participate. AUPED 232 Introduction to Biomechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the application of physical laws to movement and structure. Principles of motion, force, and equilibrium are stressed. Various sport skills are examined from a biomechanical perspective. Prerequisite: AUPED 112. AUPED 241 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-2s-0). Study of the theory and practice of adult physical fitness as it relates to health enhancement and preventive medicine. Emphasis is on opportunities to experience a variety of activities potentially capable of enriching lifestyle. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPED 241 and 245. AUPED 245 Health and Wellness for Life Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course will examine current health issues that influence wellness and healthy living. Students will be introduced to wellness models and theories and will be provided with opportunities to consider and understand personal health decisions. Topics will include: stress management, physical activity, health decision-making, nutrition, chronic disease and environmental health. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPED 245 and AUPED 241. AUPED 261 Psychology of Sport Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the psychological aspects of the competitive sports experience, with emphasis on the multidimensional factors involved in the psychology of sport. AUPED 262 Sport, Physical Activity, and the Body: Historical Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of major themes in the history of sport, physical activity, and the body. Beginning with the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome, the course explores the social, cultural, political, philosophical, religious, and economic factors that have influenced sport, physical education, and attitudes toward the body in various time periods. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPED 262 and AUHIS 212.

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must be able to skate and must provide their own skates, stick, hockey gloves, helmet, elbow pads and shin pads. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPAC 175 and AUPED 105.

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AUPED 266 Women in Sport and Physical Activity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Biomechanics, physiology, and psychology, along with related concerns of nutrition, injuries, menstrual function, and aging, as they affect women who participate in sport and physical activity. The relationship among sport, femininity, and sexuality is investigated.

and youth culture, labour relations and free agency, salary caps and revenue sharing, minor hockey, audiences and the mass media, fighting and violence, league expansion and franchise relocations, and arena construction. Prerequisites: Third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUMGT 360 and AUPED 360.

AUPED 275 Introduction to Coaching Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Comprehensive introduction to coaching principles, including sport psychology, training principles, sport pedagogy, ethics, and risk management.

AUPED 368 History of Sport in Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the history of sport in Canadian society, from colonial times to the present. The course links developments in sport to wider changes in Canadian society and social relations. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPED 368 and AUHIS 368.

AUPED 281 Explorations of the Canadian North Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). In this course students will examine the Canadian North from an experiential perspective. Students will study the many factors involved in an extended winter expedition in sub-arctic Canada and will spend two weeks in the North participating in dogsled expedition, seminars, personal narrative writing, and a variety of other outdoor activities. In addition, students will analyze narratives from the Canadian North, with a focus on the expedition region. This course includes a 17-day expedition during February Spring Break and the week following. Prerequisite: AUPED 184. AUPED 285 Introduction to Ski Touring Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Course includes a 1 week expedition. Opportunity for self-awareness and personal and group leadership development through outdoor tripping and small-group living. The students will learn skills associated with ski touring, travel in avalanche terrain, telemark skiing, and Leave No Trace camping. Prerequisites: One of AUPED 184, 286, and successful completion of a ski competency test. Notes: A student must demonstrate basic competency in skiing (downhill or cross-country). The course requires participation in field trips. A student must furnish his or her own outdoor clothing and sleeping bag. Credit can be received for only one of AUPED 185 and AUPED 285. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUPED 286 Outdoor Education and Leadership Œ3 (fi 6) (spring/summer, variable). Opportunity for self-awareness and personal and group leadership development through extended outdoor tripping and smallgroup living. The skills associated with intermediate/advanced backpacking, wilderness navigation, white water canoeing, and Leave No Trace camping are developed and practised. Prerequisites: AUPED 184 or equivalent, and consent of the instructor. Corequisite: AUPAC 226 or 326. Notes: The course requires participation in field trips. A student must furnish his or her own outdoor clothing, footwear, and sleeping bag. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUPED 290 Studies in Leadership Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the current theories, concepts, and issues of leadership. The course provides a student with a foundation for leadership practica. AUPED 292 Physical Education Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-2). Practicum placement to gain awareness and experience in the leadership and instruction of physical education. Prerequisite: AUPED 290 or consent of the instructor. Note: Open only to a student with a major or minor in Physical Education. AUPED 294 Physical Education Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to Physical Education research skills. Prerequisite: Second-year standing or consent of the instructor. Corequisite: Any senior course in Physical Education that requires library research. Note: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. AUPED 314 Exercise Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-2). Study of the physiological response of the human body to acute exercise and to chronic exercise (training). Prerequisite: AUPED 215. AUPED 342 Training Methodologies and Athletic Performance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of current training and conditioning methodologies used to prepare athletes. The course emphasizes physiological adaptation, specificity, and factors that influence the training process. Prerequisites: AUPED 314. Notes: Open only to a student with a major, or minor in Physical Education. AUPED 351 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Study in the recognition and treatment of athletic injuries and vulnerable body structures, with emphasis on evaluation, modalities of treatment, rehabilitation, and current issues. Prerequisites: AUPED 112 and 215. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUPED 360 Hockey: Culture and Commerce Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the cultural and business aspects of the sport of hockey, historically and in the present. The course explores such topics as fan identities, cultural memory and tradition, race and ethnicity, gender

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AUPED 369 The Modern Olympic Games Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the historical development of the modern Olympic Games. Topics include politics, nationalism, culture, commercialism, media, gender, race and identity. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPED 369 and AUHIS 312. AUPED 370 Selected Topics in Physical Education and Sport Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of physical education and sport. Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: Vary according to topic; second year standing. Note: AUPED 370 is classified as an arts course. AUPED 371 Selected Topics in Physical Education and Sport Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of physical education and sport. Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: Vary according to topic; third-year standing. Note: AUPED 371 is classified as an arts course. AUPED 372 Selected Topics in Physical Education and Sport Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of physical education and sport. Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: Vary according to topic; third-year standing. Note: AUPED 372 is classified as an arts course. AUPED 373 Selected Topics in Physical Education and Sport Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of physical education and sport. Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: Vary according to topic; third-year standing. Note: AUPED 373 is classified as an arts course. AUPED 374 Selected Topics in Physical Education and Sport Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of physical education and sport. Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: Vary according to topic; third-year standing. Note: AUPED 374 is classified as a science course. AUPED 375 Selected Topics in Physical Education and Sport Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of physical education and sport. Topics vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: Vary according to topic; third-year standing. Note: AUPED 375 is classified as a science course. AUPED 383 Programming and Processing the Adventure Experience Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the concepts and theories of adventure program planning and design as well as the concepts and theories of adventure program processing such as briefing and debriefing. Prerequisites: AUPED 389; one of AUPED 184, 285, 286. AUPED 385 Advanced Ski Touring Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). This course follows the curriculum similar to the Canadian Avalanche Association Avalanche Safety Training Level II course. Specifically, students will learn to use the Avaluator(Trademark) tool, practise monitoring weather and snow conditions as well as logbook keeping, be able to identify and practise route finding and decision-making in avalanche terrain, develop and practise avalanche rescue, winter camping and telemark ski skills. The course includes a 5-10 day ski touring expedition. Prerequisite: AUPED 185 or 285. AUPED 387 Arctic Expedition Planning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the many factors involved in extended Arctic canoe expeditions. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore the biological, geographical, historical, and sociological aspects of the Canadian North. Students will plan and prepare for an extended Arctic canoe expedition. Prerequisites: One of AUPED 184, 286; Œ3 in Geography and consent of the instructor. Notes: This course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUGEO 343 or AUPED 388. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 341, 342 and AUPED 387. AUPED 388 Arctic Canoe Expedition Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). Examination, involving a three- to four-week expedition in the summer, of leadership, group dynamics, risk management, navigation, logistics, wilderness ethics, and other theories and practices associated with extended Arctic canoe expeditions. Prerequisites: AUGEO 341, 342 or AUPED 387; and consent of the instructor(s). Notes: Expedition costs, as well as course tuition, are the student’s responsibility. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGEO 343 and AUPED 388. Requires payment of additional student instructional

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AUPED 389 Foundations of Outdoor, Adventure, and Experiential Education Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the historical and philosophical roots of outdoor, adventure, and experiential education. Prerequisite: One of AUPED 184, 285, 286. AUPED 393 Tests and Measurements in Physical Education Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Administration, construction, and analysis of tests and measurements utilized in health and physical education. Descriptive and inferential statistics are emphasized. Note: Students must have at least third year standing. AUPED 414 Advanced Exercise and Occupational Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course, which covers acute and chronic response to exercise, and the underlying mechanisms of adaptation, will extend the students’ understanding of exercise physiology. It will also introduce the topic of occupational physiology. The students will have input into the topics selected for presentation and discussion. Topics that may be covered include the influence of exercise in the treatment of various disease states, and the physical requirement of various occupations and occupational testing. Prerequisite(s): AUPED 314. Note: This course was formerly (for 2 years) AUPED 375 (Special Topics in Physical Education and Sport); credit may be obtained for only one of these courses and AUPED 414. AUPED 462 Issues in Physical Education Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of issues as they relate to physical education and athletics. The emphasis is on developing a capability to reason and think critically on issues of importance to the discipline of Physical Education. Prerequisite: Œ12 in Physical Education; fourth-year standing. AUPED 469 Sport and Canadian Popular Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the role of sport in Canadian popular culture, historically and in the present. Topics include the power of the media to create audiences for sport; the role of sport in the construction of local, regional, and national identities; the continental dimensions of professional sport; the place of sport in the negotiation of gender relations; the use of sport by the Canadian government; and the position of sport in an increasingly global economy and culture. AUPED 490 Directed Study I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Physical Education as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Third-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPED 491 Directed Study II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Physical Education as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Third-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPED 492 Directed Study III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Physical Education as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Third-year standing and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPED 493 Introduction to Research in Physical Education Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to a set of skills that can be used to better comprehend the research literature and to recognize new questions that need to be researched. Concepts of validity, reliability, experimental design, statistical applications, and construction of proposals and theses are studied. Prerequisite: AUPED 393 and fourth-year standing. AUPED 497 Directed Study IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Physical Education as defined by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Third-year standing and consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPED 497 is classified as a science course.

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Augustana Faculty - Physics, AUPHY

credit in Physics 30. Topics include vectors, forces in equilibrium, linear and rotational motion, dynamics of particles, and oscillations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1 or consent of the instructor. Notes: AUPHY 102 does not count toward the major in Mathematics and Physics or the minor in Physics. The course is intended to be taken in sequence with AUPHY 106. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 102, 104, 110. AUPHY 104 Introductory General Physics I (Mechanics) Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3/2). Content is the same as that of AUPHY 102, but is designed for a student who has credit in Physics 30. Prerequisites: Physics 30 and Mathematics 30-1. Notes: The course does not count toward the major in Mathematics and Physics or the minor in Physics. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 104, 102, 110. AUPHY 106 Introductory General Physics II (Wave Motion, Sound, Heat, and Optics) Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2). Properties of gases, liquids, and solids; wave motion and sound; heat and thermodynamics; geometrical and physical optics. Prerequisite: One of AUPHY 102, 104, 110. Notes: The course does not count toward the major in Mathematics and Physics or the minor in Physics. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 106, 120. AUPHY 110 Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Vectors, kinematics, work, energy, momentum, dynamics, and periodic motion. Prerequisites: Physics 30 and Mathematics 30-1. Corequisite: AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 110, 102, 104. AUPHY 120 Waves, Thermodynamics, and Optics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Oscillatory motion, waves on a string, sound waves, interference of waves, temperature, heat, entropy, first and second laws of thermodynamics, geometric optics, interference of light. Prerequisites: AUPHY 102 or 104 or 110; AUMAT 110 or 111 or 116. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 120, 106. AUPHY 250 Electricity and Magnetism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Electric fields, Gauss’s law, magnetic fields, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, induction, direct and alternating currents. Prerequisites: AUPHY 110 and AUMAT 112. AUPHY 260 Introduction to Relativity and Quantum Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special relativity; photons and matter waves; Bohr atom model; Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle; Schrödinger equation; onedimensional systems; hydrogen atom; spin; Pauli Exclusion Principle; many-electron atoms; molecules. Prerequisites: AUPHY 120 and AUMAT 112. Corequisite: AUMAT 211 is recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 260, AUCHE 277. AUPHY 270 Astrophysics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The physics of the Universe. Observational methods. Stars, planetary systems, black holes, galaxies. Big Bang cosmology. Prerequisite: AUPHY 120. AUPHY 291 Advanced Laboratory I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3). Experiments in classical mechanics and other senior physics topics. Prerequisites: AUPHY 120. Corequisite: Any senior Physics course. AUPHY 310 Classical Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Vector calculus, Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, gravitation, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics. Prerequisites: AUPHY 120 and 250. Corequisites: AUMAT 212; AUMAT 330 is recommended. AUPHY 321 Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Microscopic behaviour and quantum states; statistics of small and large systems; internal energy and equipartition; the laws of thermodynamics; thermal, mechanical, and diffusive interactions; introduction to classical and quantum statistics; Gibbs’ paradox; Maxwell’s relations. Prerequisites: AUPHY 120 and AUMAT 211. Corequisite: AUMAT 212 or 330 is recommended. AUPHY 340 Numerical Methods in Physics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1.5). Computer arithmetic and errors, solution of systems of linear equations, root finding, interpolation, numerical quadrature, and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations. Applications from physics are included. Prerequisite: AUMAT 120. Corequisite: AUPHY 120 or 250, AUMAT 211. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 340, AUCSC 340, AUMAT 340.

Undergraduate Courses

AUPHY 350 Electromagnetic Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A vector calculus formulation of electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electrodynamics in free space, and an introduction to electromagnetic waves. Topics include: Lorentz force, Maxwell’s equations in differential form, potential formulations, and work, energy, and momentum. Prerequisite: AUPHY 250. Corequisite: AUMAT 212.

AUPHY 102 Introductory General Physics I (Mechanics) Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-2L-3/2). Noncalculus course in physics for a student without

AUPHY 360 Quantum Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The breakdown of classical physics. Topics include:

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wave packets and uncertainty relations, the Schrodinger equation and simple systems, postulates and interpretation of quantum mechanics, operator methods, angular momentum and spin, central force problems and the hydrogen atom. Prerequisites: AUMAT 211; one of AUCHE 277, AUPHY 260. Corequisites: AUPHY 310 and AUMAT 330 are recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCHE 377 and AUPHY 360. AUPHY 391 Advanced Laboratory II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3). Experiments in optics, atomic and/or molecular physics, and other senior physics topics. Prerequisite: AUPHY 291. Corequisite: AUPHY 260. AUPHY 395 Directed Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Intensive study of a specific problem or area of physics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Notes: Admission to AUPHY 395 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 on the major in Mathematics and Physics. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPHY 480 History of Physics and Mathematics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Integrated history of mathematics and physics, emphasizing the scientific revolution and the subsequent development of mathematics and physics as distinct disciplines. Prerequisite: AUMAT 211 and one of AUPHY 250, 260, or AUCHE 277. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHY 480, 380, AUMAT 380, 480. AUPHY 495 Directed Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-3). Intensive study of a specific problem or area of physics as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing. Notes: Admission to AUPHY 495 normally requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 on the major in Mathematics and Physics. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

231.53

Augustana Faculty - Political Studies, AUPOL Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUPOL 103 Introduction to Global and Political Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the ideas and key concepts that comprise the vocabulary of global and political studies. The course considers such ideas as democracy, order, power, authority, justice, freedom, development, globalization and equality. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUGDS 103 and AUPOL 103. AUPOL 104 Introduction to Politics: Processes and Institutions of Government Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the design and operation of political institutions as well as the electoral and policy processes of liberal-democratic government. Topics include legislatures, executives, constitutions, courts, interest groups, and the media and politics. AUPOL 200 The Research Process Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course is designed to introduce students to the research process and various methodological approaches within political studies, while helping students to develop research and information literacy skills. Topics include: research design and communication, quantitative and qualitative methods, exploring and assessing sources of information, and various approaches to the study of politics. Prerequisite: AUPOL 103 or AUPOL 104. AUPOL 201 Political Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Political Studies. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Political Studies degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Political Studies that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 201, AUCRI 260, AUSOC 231. AUPOL 210 History of Political Thought I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical and critical survey of the development of political and social philosophy focusing on classical Greece and Rome, with selected readings from such major political writers as Plato, Aristotle, and Thucydides. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 210 and AUPHI 240. AUPOL 211 History of Political Thought II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical and critical survey of the political ideas of early-modern Europe, with readings from such selected major writers as Hobbes, Locke, Marx, and de Tocqueville. The course treats issues of authority, liberty, property, equality, and democracy. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, 210, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 211 and AUPHI 241.

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AUPOL 215 Political Ideology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the history of political ideas and the movements formed around them from the French Revolution to the present. Included are liberalism, socialism, nationalism, fascism; and contemporary social movements, environmental and otherwise. AUPOL 221 Canadian National Government and Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Structure and function of the Government of Canada, especially the crown, cabinet, public service, House of Commons, Senate, and judiciary. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, consent of the instructor. AUPOL 228 Politics in Alberta Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Aspects of politics and governance in Alberta. Emphasis is given to any or all of political economy, political culture, parties and institutions, federal-provincial relations, prairie political ideas, the particular experience of rural Alberta, and comparative study of other prairie and/or resource-based provinces and United States. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, consent of the instructor. AUPOL 233 United States Government and Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Institutions of the United States government with emphasis on the national level. The course covers the constitution, presidency, Congress, national bureaucracy, judiciary, and public policy-making. Prerequisite: AUPOL 103 or 104. AUPOL 239 Cuban Government and Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Survey of Cuban state institutions, political ideas, the Organs of Popular Power, the Communist Party of Cuba, and mass organizations. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 239 and AUSPA 252. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program. AUPOL 240 Introduction to International Relations I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the key themes in the study of relations between states and other key actors engaged in world politics. Students will study the historical evolution of the international system; key theories of international relations; and major institutions such as the United Nations. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, consent of the Instructor. AUPOL 241 Introduction to International Relations II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the study of international political economy and examination of major issues in world politics. Issues may include: nuclear proliferation; the weaponization of space; development and inequality; terrorism; the regulation of international economic relations; global environmental politics; and the differential experiences of gender and race internationally. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 240, consent of the Instructor. AUPOL 248 Model United Nations/International Organization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Preparation for and participation in a multipleuniversity, international Model United Nations Assembly or similar competition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, by application. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUPOL 300 Third-Year Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Students undertake research on a topic of their choice, leading to the production of a draft paper and an oral presentation. The course builds on the skills from AUPOL 200 and involves further instruction on research methods, building research proposals, conducting research projects, and approaches to the study of politics. Prerequisite: AUPOL 200. AUPOL 310 Contemporary Political Thought Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration into the prospects of democratic governance and political community through the reading of selected twentieth and twenty-first century writings. Prerequisites: AUPOL 210 or 211, or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 310, 410 (2010) and AUPHI 340. AUPOL 312 Selected Topics in the History of Political Thought Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of the texts of a particular theorist or of an issue central to the history of political thought. Topics vary from year to year. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 210, 211, consent of the instructor. AUPOL 321 Provincial Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of provincial politics focused on Alberta, including comparisons to other Canadian provinces and addressing the relationship between the politics of these provinces and the institutions and ideas of federalism in Canada. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, consent of the instructor. AUPOL 324 Selected Topics in Canadian Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of Canadian politics. Topics may vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: AUPOL 221. AUPOL 325 Contemporary Issues in the Politics of Native Peoples Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Contemporary politics of aboriginal rights and demands for self-government, primarily in Canada, set within the context of traditional conceptions of governance, the history of state policy and legal decisions, and comparative experience in the United States and México.

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other locations depending on the year. Through lectures, tours and research taking place in China, this course explores the effects of economic and institutional reforms as well as those of globalization, with links to China’s history and to its culture. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUECO 356 and AUPOL 356.

AUPOL 328 Environmental Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of contemporary debates in, and the evolution of, environmental policy and politics. This course will focus on Canadian issues in a comparative perspective, exploring topics such as environmental political theory, the policy cycle, social movements, international issues, and related case studies. Prerequisite: Œ3 credits in either Environmental Studies/ Science or Political Studies. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 328 and AUENV 328.

AUPOL 357 Selected Topics in Comparative Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of comparative politics. Topics may vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104.

AUPOL 329 Politics and Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Drawing on existing work in the areas of political culture, cultural studies and popular culture, this course explores the relationship and tension between politics and culture in western states, with a focus on Canada. Prerequisites: AUPOL 103 or 104. AUPOL 341 The Global South and World Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Entry of the non-Western world into international relations, economic and political relations between “North” and “South,” and diplomacy in an age of tremendous inequality, cultural diversity, and pressing global problems such as the environment. AUPOL 343 Selected Topics in International Political Economy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of international political economy. Topics may vary from year to year, depending on the instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 241, consent of the Instructor. AUPOL 344 Selected Topics in International Relations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics vary from year to year. The focus is on contemporary issues in world politics. Prerequisite: AUPOL 240 or consent of the instructor. AUPOL 345 Canadian Foreign Policy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the debates concerning Canada’s place and foreign policy in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 240, consent of the instructor. AUPOL 346 United States Foreign Policy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). United States foreign policy in the postwar era of predominance in international relations, viewed through a range of theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 240, consent of the Instructor. AUPOL 348 Model United Nations/International Organization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Preparation for and participation in a multipleuniversity, international Model United Nations Assembly or similar competition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, by application. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. AUPOL 349 Ethics in World Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of ethical questions that emerge out of political practice at a time when ideas of global governance, economy, and culture are increasingly commonplace. Subjects may include war, genocide and humanitarian intervention, human rights, refugees, reconciliation in post-conflict societies, the distribution of wealth, citizenship and moral responsibility; and the historic tension between statist-nationalist, cosmopolitan, and other expressions of identity and ethical orientation. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 240, senior standing in a related discipline, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 349, 449.

AUPOL 358 Economic Development and Institutional Change in China Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A survey of China’s growth and economic development in the pre reform and post reform periods, exploring ideology, institutional structures, and state planning, and analyzing the impact of globalization on China’s business and political practices. Prerequisite: AUECO 101 and one of AUPOL 103 or AUPOL 104; or consent of the instructor. Note: Credit maybe obtained for only one of AUECO 354 and AUPOL 358. AUPOL 399 Political Internship Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Students have the opportunity to combine work experience with academic study through the development and completion of an internship program related to politics. As part of the internship, students are required to complete a major research paper related to their work. Prerequisites: Third-year standing in a Political Studies major and consent of the instructor. Notes: Students must develop an internship program and have it approved by a supervisor. Normally, students must also have a GPA of 3.5 or better in Political Studies to be eligible for this course. AUPOL 401 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of political studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies. AUPOL 402 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of political studies as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUPOL 401 and consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies. AUPOL 405 Research Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). A research and reflection intensive course for students to conduct and finalize an in-depth independent project within a seminar setting. Instruction may also involve questions regarding methodology, theory, political action and the presuppositions of researchers. Prerequisites: AUPOL 300. AUPOL 411 International Relations Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Critical survey of the principal contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of international politics. Prerequisite: AUPOL 240. AUPOL 412 Selected Topics in the History of Political Thought Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of the texts of a particular theorist or of an issue central to the history of political thought. Topics vary from year to year. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 210, 211, consent of the instructor. AUPOL 422 The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the Canadian Charter and its effect on Canadian politics and government. The course traces the development of Charter jurisprudence and examines the Charter’s effect on federalism, public policy (including criminal law), and political culture. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, 221, AUCRI 160, AUIDS 160. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 422 and AUCRI 422.

AUPOL 350 Comparative European Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Comparative analysis of selected issues in western European politics, focusing on Britain, Germany, and other countries. Prerequisite: AUPOL 103 or 104.

AUPOL 424 Selected Topics in Canadian Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of Canadian politics. Topics may vary from year to year, depending on instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: AUPOL 221.

AUPOL 353 Law, Politics, and the Judicial Process Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the Canadian judicial branch of government in comparative perspective. The course probes court structures; judicial independence, appointment, discipline, and removal; judicial decision making processes; and courts and the public policy process. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, 221, AUCRI 160, AUIDS 160. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 353 and AUCRI 353.

AUPOL 443 Selected Topics in International Political Economy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Advanced study of a particular dimension of international political economy. Topics may vary from year to year, depending on the instructor and student interest. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 241, consent of the Instructor.

AUPOL 355 Gender and Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration of the social and political construction of gender and the impact of gender on politics through an examination of gender with regards to one or more of the following areas: representation, social policy, feminist political thought, international relations, development, and/or globalization. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 103, 104, AUIDS 230. AUPOL 356 China Tour: Experiencing Development and Change Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). A three week study trip to China, including travel to educational institutions in Zhuhai, the Zhuhai Special Economic Zone and

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AUPOL 444 Selected Topics in International Relations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics vary from year to year. The focus is on contemporary issues in world politics. Prerequisite: AUPOL 240 or consent of the instructor. AUPOL 449 Ethics in World Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of ethical questions that emerge out of political practice at a time when ideas of global governance, economy, and culture are increasingly commonplace. Subjects may include war, genocide and humanitarian intervention, human rights, refugees, reconciliation in post-conflict societies, the distribution of wealth, citizenship and moral responsibility; and the historic tension between statist-nationalist, cosmopolitan, and other expressions of

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AUPOL 327 Canadian Federalism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of the development and theories of Canadian federalism. Attention is given to current problems of the federal system. Prerequisite: AUPOL 103 or 104.

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identity and ethical orientation. Prerequisite: One of AUPOL 240, senior standing in a related discipline, consent of the instructor. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPOL 349, 449. AUPOL 453 Women and the Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course explores historical and contemporary relationships between women and the Canadian legal system. The course uses feminist legal theory to explore the evolution of areas of Canadian law of particular interest to women (for example: reproduction, abortion, family law, rape laws, criminal law) and political activism around the law and women’s issues. Prerequisites: One of AUCRI 353, AUPOL 353, 355 or AUIDS 230. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUCRI 453 and AUPOL 453. AUPOL 455 Ethnicity and Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Exploration of the social and political construction of ethnicity and race through the lens of one or more aspects of ethnic politics, such as nationalism, immigration, multinational states, diasporas, and/or genocide. Prerequisites: One of AUPOL 103, 104; minimum third year standing. AUPOL 494 Political Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of psychological theory and research applied to the political realm. Topics covered may include psychological methods applied to political thought/action, political attitudes, political values and orientations, voter behaviour, effects of political campaigning, intergroup relations, motivating collective political movements, and the psychology of terrorism. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102; third year standing; One of AUPSY 240 or AUPSY 220 is highly recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only on of AUPSY 448 and AUPOL 494.

231.54

Augustana Faculty - Psychology, AUPSY Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUPSY 101 Basic Psychological Processes Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the discipline of Psychology and its methods. The course focuses on the basic principles underlying human behaviour. Topics include the central nervous system, perception, learning, memory, sleep, and dreams.

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AUPSY 267 Sensory Processes and Perception Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the theoretical and experimental issues associated with sensory processes and perceptual experience. Prerequisite: AUPSY 101. AUPSY 275 An Introduction to the Brain and Nervous System Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system, with a special emphasis on the brain. Prerequisite: AUPSY 101. AUPSY 301 Psycholinguistics Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Detailed examination of issues in the psychology of language. The course adopts a seminar style that focuses on discussion, oral presentation, and writing skills. Prerequisites: AUPSY 263 and third-year standing. Note: Open only to a student with a major or minor in Psychology. AUPSY 302 Developmental Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Detailed examination of issues in developmental psychology. The course adopts a seminar style that focuses on discussion, oral presentation, and writing skills. Prerequisites: AUPSY 256 and third-year standing. Note: Open only to a student with a major or minor in Psychology. AUPSY 303 Sleep, Emotion, and Stress: Physiological Psychology Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Detailed examination of issues in physiological psychology. The course adopts a seminar style that focuses on discussion, oral presentation, and writing skills. Prerequisites: AUPSY 275 and third-year standing. Note: Open only to a student with a major or minor in Psychology. AUPSY 304 Personality Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Detailed examination of issues in personality psychology. The course adopts a seminar style that focuses on discussion, oral presentation, and writing skills. Topics include qualitative methods, crosssituational consistency, and the relationship between personality and psychotherapy. Prerequisites: AUPSY 220; third-year standing. Note: Open only to a student with a major or minor in Psychology. AUPSY 307 Cognitive Psychology Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Detailed examination of issues in cognitive psychology. The course adopts a seminar style that focuses on discussion, oral presentation, and writing skills. Prerequisites: AUPSY 263 and third-year standing. Note: Open only to a student with a major in Psychology.

AUPSY 102 Individual and Social Behaviour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the discipline of Psychology and its methods. The course focuses on the study of human development, personality, psychological disorders and their treatment, and social psychology.

AUPSY 308 Social Psychology Seminar Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Detailed examination of issues in social/personality psychology. The course adopts a seminar style that focuses on discussion, oral presentation, and writing skills. Topics will survey issues in the areas of social research methodology, attitudes, close relationships, and interpersonal and group processes. Prerequisites: AUPSY 240; third-year standing. Note: Open only to a student with a major or minor in Psychology.

AUPSY 207 Psychology Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Psychology. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Psychology degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Psychology that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Students are encouraged to take this course in their second year of studies.

AUPSY 313 Advanced Research Design Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In this course, students will continue to build upon their existing knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research design. Some topics include: The role of theory in psychological research, critical thinking, advanced topics in quantitative and qualitative design, and integrating methods. Prerequisites: AUPSY 213.

AUPSY 213 Statistical Methods for Psychological Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Application of statistical methods to psychological problems. Various experimental and non-experimental methods will be introduced. Topics include the scientific method, quantitative research designs, sampling and measuring techniques, biases in experimentation and ethical issues, measures of central tendency and variability, and tests of statistical hypothesis. Students will become familiar with the American Psychological Association (APA) standards of research and writing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 213, AUSTA 153, 213, 215.

AUPSY 316 Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to theoretical and philosophical psychology. Topics include: Theories of “self” and “identity”, critical thinking, the role of theory in psychological research, theoretical and methodological pluralism, theory evaluation and integration, and topics from the philosophies of psychology and science. Prerequisites: AUPSY 101 or 102 and third year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 316 and AUPSY 410 (2011).

AUPSY 220 Personality Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introductory survey including representative theoretical points of view and research relevant to the major problems of the study of personality. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102. AUPSY 240 Social Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of theories and research on the individual in a social context. Topics may include self presentation, values/attitudes/beliefs, leadership, group dynamics, interpersonal attraction, and aggression. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102.

AUPSY 331 Psychological Assessment: Theory and Practice Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory and use of test data in counselling children and adults. Topics include the theory, administration and interpretation of selected tests associated with self-exploration (e.g., personality, psychopathology), intelligence and decision-making (e.g., career choices). Emphasis is placed on the selection and ethical use of tests. Prerequisite: AUPSY 213. AUPSY 338 Intimate Relationships and Human Sexuality Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of research on intimate relationships and human sexuality from individual and interpersonal perspectives. Topics covered may include methods of sexuality/relationship science, attraction, gender identity, sex roles, sexual orientation, sexual attitudes and behavior, and relationship stresses. Prerequisite: AUPSY 240; third-year standing.

AUPSY 256 Developmental Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Biological, cognitive, and social aspects of psychological development, with special emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102.

AUPSY 342 Health Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An overview of theory, research and practice of health psychology and behavioural medicine. Prerequisite: AUPSY 220 or 240.

AUPSY 263 Memory and Cognition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the study of mental processes in memory and cognition. Topics include short- and long-term memory phenomenon, visual attention, consciousness, problem solving and decision making. Prerequisite: AUPSY 101.

AUPSY 344 Environmental Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Systematic study of the dynamic interchange between people and their social and physical environmental contexts. Topics include theories of environmental perception, the effects of crowding, the impact of natural/urban settings, the effects of building design and colours, and managing

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AUPSY 346 Community Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the theories, approaches, and values behind social intervention intended to ameliorate, or prevent, psychological difficulty. Examples of community change are drawn from a Canadian context whenever possible. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102. AUPSY 348 Industrial and Organizational Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An overview of theories and research relevant to understanding human behaviour in the workplace. Prerequisite: AUPSY 240. AUPSY 361 Cognitive Development Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the development of memory, perception, conceptual thought, and academic skills from birth through the school years. Prerequisite: AUPSY 263. Notes: AUPSY 361 is classified as a science course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 361 or AUPSY 362. AUPSY 362 Cognitive Development Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the development of memory, perception, conceptual thought, and academic skills from birth through the school years. Prerequisite: AUPSY 256. Notes: AUPSY 362 is classified as an arts course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 361 or AUPSY 362. AUPSY 363 Social Cognition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of human cognition in an applied, social context. Topics covered include social judgment, decision-making, person/ group perception, autobiographical memory, motivated cognition, and emotion. Prerequisite: AUPSY 240 or 263. AUPSY 369 Principles of Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). In-depth examination of classical and operant conditioning. Prerequisites: AUPSY 101 and Œ3 at a senior level in Psychology. AUPSY 373 Psychology of Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the production and perception of spoken, signed, and written language. Topics include speech perception, speech production, reading, language acquisition, and language origins. Prerequisite: AUPSY 263 AUPSY 377 Human Neuropsychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of changes in mood, motivation, perception, attention, memory, and cognition, as revealed by structural alterations in the human brain. Prerequisite: AUPSY 275 or consent of the instructor. AUPSY 382 Family Violence: Dynamics and Prevention Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Dynamics and prevention of abuse in the family (i.e., child abuse and couple violence). Topics include theories and controversies, assessment and screening of abuse, psychological consequences of abuse on all family members, and family violence prevention and treatment programs. Prerequisite: AUPSY 240. AUPSY 391 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of psychology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPSY 391 is classified as a science course; AUPSY 392 is classified as an arts course. AUPSY 392 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of psychology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPSY 391 is classified as a science course; AUPSY 392 is classified as an arts course. AUPSY 404 Selected Topics in Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Content of each course in this series varies from year to year, but in general it entails either a specific topic of prominent interest in psychology, or a review and discussion of a novel or emerging research area in contemporary psychology. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102. Note: AUPSY 404 is classified as an arts course. AUPSY 406 Selected Topics in Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Content of each course in this series varies from year to year, but in general it entails either a specific topic of prominent interest in psychology, or a review and discussion of a novel or emerging research area in contemporary psychology. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102. Note: AUPSY 406 is classified as an arts course. AUPSY 408 History and Systems of Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of major theoretical approaches to psychology, especially in the last two centuries, emphasizing the historical antecedents and contemporary significance of each. Prerequisites: AUPSY 101 or 102, and fourth year standing. Notes: Open only to a student with a major in Psychology. AUPSY 408 is classified as an arts course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 408 or AUPSY 409.

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AUPSY 409 History and Systems of Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of major theoretical approaches to psychology, especially in the last two centuries, emphasizing the historical antecedents and contemporary significance of each. Prerequisites: AUPSY 101 or 102, and fourth year standing. Notes: Open only to a student with a major in Psychology. AUPSY 409 is classified as a science course. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 408 or AUPSY 409. AUPSY 414 Program Evaluation in Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to program evaluation in psychology. Topics include: goals of program evaluation, evaluation strategies, evaluation methods and designs, using logic models for program evaluation, and case studies in program evaluation. Prerequisites: AUPSY 213. AUPSY 426 Psychology of Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An in-depth examination of psychological theories and research examining religious thought and behaviour. Topics may include spirituality, religious fundamentalism, religiosity, guilt, forgiveness, morality, mysticism, religious coping and health, conversion, religious socialization, ritual. Prerequisites: One of AUPSY 220, 240; third year standing. AUPSY 441 Emotion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of theory and research on affect and emotion science. Topics covered may include the history of emotion research, measurement and classification of specific emotions, neurobiology of emotions, cognitive and cultural influences, consequences of emotions/moods, and disorders of emotion. Prerequisite: AUPSY 240 or 275; third year standing. AUPSY 442 Psychology in a Cultural Context Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of cultural differences in psychological processes such as perception, memory, motivation, emotion, values, language, interpersonal relationships and the implications of these differences for cultural interactions. Prerequisites: One of AUPSY 220, 240; third year standing. AUPSY 448 Political Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of psychological theory and research applied to the political realm. Topics covered may include psychological methods applied to political thought/action, political attitudes, political values and orientations, voter behavior, effects of political campaigning, intergroup relations, motivating collective political movements, and the psychology of terrorism. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102; third year standing; one of AUPSY 240 or AUPSY 220 is highly recommended. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 448 and AUPOL 494. AUPSY 471 Language Acquisition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In-depth look at the language acquisition process from birth through the preschool years. The stages of language development are discussed, as well as theoretical issues such as the role of the environment versus genetic predisposition. Prerequisite: AUPSY 373. AUPSY 477 The Neurobiology of Learning, Memory, and Addiction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigation of the neural mechanisms that underlie learning, memory, and addiction. Prerequisite: AUPSY 275. AUPSY 483 Psychological Disorders Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced-level course that focuses on the research related to the etiology, classification, assessment, and treatment of a variety of psychological disorders in children and adults (e.g., anxiety, addictions, depression, schizophrenia, and personality disorders). A student becomes acquainted with the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Prerequisite: AUPSY 275. AUPSY 486 is highly recommended. AUPSY 486 Clinical and Counselling Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Overview of the major approaches to counselling, providing the foundation for the counselling process. The student is involved in a variety of experiences in order to understand the basic concepts of each approach. Issues within the counselling profession such as ethical behaviour and career opportunities are also covered. Prerequisites: AUPSY 220 or 256; Œ3 in 300 level Psychology. AUPSY 331 or AUPSY 346 is highly recommended. AUPSY 488 Forensic Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the psychology of criminal behaviour and the legal system. Topics include theories of criminal behaviour, jury selection and decision-making, police interrogations and confessions, eyewitness testimony, and risk assessment and offender intervention programs. Prerequisite: AUPSY 240. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPSY 488 and AUCRI 488. AUPSY 491 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of psychology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPSY 491 is classified as a science course. AUPSY 492 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of psychology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of

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limited resources. Prerequisite: AUPSY 102; third-year standing. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUENV 344 and AUPSY 344.

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the Instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUPSY 492 is classified as an arts course. AUPSY 497 Individual Study I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Literature review and proposal (including an oral report) for fourth-year thesis. Prerequisites: AUPSY 313, fourth-year standing, and consent of the Instructor. Notes: Admission to AUPSY 497 normally requires a grade point average of at least 3.5. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in Psychology. AUPSY 497 is to be followed by AUPSY 499. AUPSY 499 Individual Study II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Fourth-year thesis research, report, and oral presentation. Prerequisite: AUPSY 497. Note: Admission to AUPSY 499 normally requires a grade point average of at least 3.5. An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

231.55

Augustana Faculty - Religion, AUREL Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUREL 100 Exploring Religious Meaning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration of religious meaning through the examination of selected themes from Christian theology and from other religions. The themes include ways of conceiving of the divine, the problem of evil, the human predicament, the relationship of religion and society, and ideas of salvation.

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AUREL 241 Basic Themes in Christian Thought Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the basic themes of Christianity. Attention is given to the expression of these themes in the Bible, creedal statements, and contemporary theological literature. AUREL 247 Theology of Luther Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Critical study of the genesis, development, and structure of Luther’s theology. AUREL 252 Christian Understanding of Human Nature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the place of human nature in Western thought since the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century, showing the relationship between the development of various non-Christian views and the responses of religious thinkers, primarily Christians. Emphasis is placed on the twentieth century. AUREL 257 Modern Ethics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Contemporary problems in religious ethics and their impact on individual and collective decision-making in the areas of personal and social issues. AUREL 260 India Tour Orientation Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Examination of the intersection between religion and development in India. Students research and present on a particular topic relevant to the intersection of religion and development, as well as participate in team building exercises. Issues such as health and safety, travel preparations, dealing with culture shock, and the regional geography of India will be covered. Prerequisite: One of AUREL 100, 283, AUECO 101, consent of the Instructor. Notes: This is a prerequisite course for the India Tour (AUREL 266 or AUECO 254). Costs associated with the India Tour (3-weeks) and applicable tuition are the responsibility of the student. Enrolment is limited to 15 students. This course can only be taken by students who also register in AUREL 266 or AUECO 254. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUREL 260 or AUECO 252.

AUREL 207 Jesus of Nazareth in Biblical Scholarship Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to religious studies through the interpretation of texts relating to one central figure, Jesus of Nazareth. The course focuses primarily on the Biblical texts about Jesus but also includes other relevant texts from a variety of times and traditions. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUREL 207 and 208.

AUREL 262 Spiritual Awareness Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the nature and function of religious language that leads to spiritual awareness. Confrontation of two problems in relation to religious language: how to relate the infinite to the finite, and how to relate and discover one’s subjective inwardness. Attention is focused on various views regarding the nature of humanity and the human spirit. Special attention is given to the nature and function of parables.

AUREL 208 Jesus of Nazareth in Contemporary Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to religious studies through an examination of contemporary theological interpretations of one central figure, Jesus of Nazareth. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUREL 208 and 207.

AUREL 263 Spirituality and Globalization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Critical investigation of the values and views of human nature implicit in the discourse of corporate globalization and of those within the alternative visions of Jesus and the Hebrew prophets.

AUREL 212 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible in Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the history and theology of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament).

AUREL 221 Johannine Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the distinctive characteristics in structure and content of John’s Gospel and letters and the book of Revelation. The course concludes with a comparison of this literature with the rest of the New Testament writings.

AUREL 266 India Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, variable). Three-week study tour of India that focuses on a chosen region of India in order to examine the intersection between religious belief and practice and development challenges. Students will be exposed to various development projects as well as an array of religious sites. It is expected that students will gain an in depth understanding of India, its cultural and religious diversity, and the challenges it faces in the 21st century. Students will be exposed to both rural and urban life. Prerequisite: AUREL 260 or AUECO 252. Notes: Costs associated with this India Tour course and applicable tuition are the responsibility of the students. Enrolment is limited to 15 students. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUREL 266 and AUECO 254. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

AUREL 222 Introduction to the New Testament Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the history and theology of the New Testament.

AUREL 270 Selected topics in Religion and Public Life Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration of several current issues of the intersection of religion and public life and of how various religious traditions engage them.

AUREL 223 Synoptic Gospels Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Comparative and historical analysis of the purpose, characteristics, and problems of the first three Gospels.

AUREL 271 Selected Topics in Religion and Public Life Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration of several current issues of the intersection of religion and public life and of how various religious traditions engage them.

AUREL 226 Pauline Epistles Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Critical literary, historical, and theological study of the Pauline writings.

AUREL 272 Selected Topics in Religion and Public Life Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration of several current issues of the intersection of religion and public life and of how various religious traditions engage them.

AUREL 228 Religious Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Religious Studies. Prerequisite: Second year standing in Philosophy and Religion degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Religion that requires library research. Note: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUREL 228, AUART 228, AUHIS 285, AUPHI 228.

AUREL 282 Major Religious Traditions: Middle East Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major religious traditions originating in the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

AUREL 216 The Hebrew Prophets Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Attempt to interpret selected prophets within their historical context. The course explores the relevance of the prophetic mode of analyzing contemporary society.

AUREL 235 The Reformation Era Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the history of the Reformation from the advocates of reform in the fourteenth century through the Counter- Reformation up to the compilation of the Book of Concord in 1580 with special emphasis on the basic religious questions of that time. The lives and writings of the chief reformers are examined in their historical and cultural contexts, and relationships to common twentieth-century issues are emphasized.

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AUREL 283 Major Religious Traditions: South Asia Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major religious traditions of India, China, and Japan: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. AUREL 290 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers selected topics in Religion. Topics may vary from year to year depending on the instructor and student interest. AUREL 291 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course covers selected topics in Religion. Topics may vary from year to year depending on the instructor and student interest.

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University of Alberta

AUREL 335 The Reformation Era Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the history of the Reformation from the advocates of reform in the fourteenth century through the Counterr Reformation up to the compilation of the Book of Concord in 1580 with special emphasis on the basic religious questions of that time. The lives and writings of the chief reformers are examined in their historical and cultural contexts, and relationships to common twentieth-century issues are emphasized. AUREL 345 Religion and Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relationship between ecology and religion from Christian and non-Christian perspectives. The course looks at ecological spirituality, ecotheology, animal rights, deep ecology, ecoactivism, and ecofeminism. It also devotes substantial time to ecological themes in Asian (Hindu, Buddhist, and Chinese) and traditional (native American and Australian aboriginal) religions. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUREL 345 and AUENV 345. AUREL 347 Theology of Luther Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Critical study of the genesis, development, and structure of Luther’s theology. AUREL 348 Justice Theologies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of modern theologies that focus on the Biblical call for justice and offer a critique of Christianity’s alignment with modern culture. These theologies of revitalization and dissent seek to change modern Christendom from within. Among those discussed are liberation, political, ecological, and feminist theologies. AUREL 349 Contemporary Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Brief survey of major trends in twentieth-century theology followed by a more in-depth study of one or two major theologians or “schools” of theology. AUREL 352 Christian Understanding of Human Nature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the place of human nature in Western thought since the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century, showing the relationship between the development of various non-Christian views and the responses of religious thinkers, primarily Christians. Emphasis is placed on the twentieth century.

AUREL 396 Directed Reading in Religion VI Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in Religion or Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUREL 397 Directed Reading in Religion VII Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in Religion or Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUREL 398 Directed Reading in Religion VIII Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in Religion or Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUREL 399 Directed Reading in Religion IX Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in Religion or Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses. AUREL 400 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUREL 401 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUREL 402 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

AUREL 384 Gods, Goddesses, and Gurus: An Introduction to Hinduism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the broad range of religious phenomena commonly referred to as “Hinduism,” especially as expressed in contemporary India. The course explores the ways Hindus think about and visualize the divine. It examines Hindu sacred texts and popular religious literature, images and stories of the major Hindu gods and goddesses, how the divine is embodied in Hindu holy men and women, and the importance of sacred geography as the basis for religious pilgrimage. It also explores the ways this religious complex is being used by various political movements within India as a vehicle for shaping national identity.

AUREL 403 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

AUREL 391 Directed Reading in Religion I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses.

AUREL 405 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

AUREL 392 Directed Reading in Religion II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses.

AUREL 406 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

AUREL 393 Directed Reading in Religion III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses.

AUREL 407 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

AUREL 394 Directed Reading in Religion IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses.

AUREL 408 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

AUREL 395 Directed Reading in Religion V Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study in a specific area of religion as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in each of these courses.

AUREL 409 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. 

AUREL 404 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

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A Course Listings

AUREL 321 Johannine Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the distinctive characteristics in structure and content of John’s Gospel and letters and the book of Revelation. The course concludes with a comparison of this literature with the rest of the New Testament writings.

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University of Alberta

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AUREL 410 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUREL 411 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUREL 412 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUREL 413 Selected Topics in Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, periods, works, methodologies, theological genres, and religious themes. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUREL 432 Philosophy, Religion Public Life Research Seminar I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Preparation of a literature review, research proposal, and presentation of a public life issue that will be explored from philosophical perspectives. Research may be participatory, archival or community based. It may include a community service learning component. Classes provide supportive and critical analysis throughout the student’s work and research process. Prerequisite: Third or fourth-year standing. Notes: Only open to students with a major in Philosophy and Religion. This course can be taken only by a student who is also registered in AUREL 433. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 422 and AUREL 432. AUREL 433 Philosophy, Religion Public Life Research Seminar II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Continuation of AUREL 432. This course involves implementing research, presentation of results, and a final writing project. Research may be participatory, archival or community based. Classes provide supportive and critical analysis throughout the student’s work and research process. Prerequisite: AUREL 432, third or fourth-year standing. Notes: Only open to students with a major in Philosophy and Religion. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUPHI 423 and AUREL 433.

231.56

Augustana Faculty - Scandinavian, AUSCA Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUSCA 101 Beginners’ Norwegian I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). AUSCA 101 and 102 are designed to develop ability in reading and writing Norwegian, with a strong emphasis on the development of comprehension and oral communication skills. During this process, the student participates in a wide variety of interactive activities and is also exposed to contemporary Norwegian culture. These two courses not only encourage the student to think critically about the principles of grammar as they relate to the Norwegian language, but also stimulate an in-depth understanding of the principles by which language functions in general. These two courses also lead the student through the steps of reflective learning as he or she considers and discusses language learning strategies. AUSCA 102 Beginners’ Norwegian II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUSCA 101. Prerequisite: AUSCA 101. AUSCA 141 Viking-Age Prose Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected family and historical sagas (Njal’s saga, Egil’s saga, Grettir’s saga, Laxdæla saga, the Vinland sagas, and others), and an introduction to Viking-age history. All lectures and readings are in English. AUSCA 142 Viking Age Mythology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of Viking Age / Old Norse mythology and heroic legends, focusing on readings in translation from the Poetic and Prose Eddas. The influence of Old Norse mythology on European and North American visual art, literature, popular culture, and music from the 19th century to the present is also examined. AUSCA 151 Modern Norwegian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Dramas of Ibsen and representative prose works (e.g. Hamsun, Undset). All lectures and readings are in English.

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AUSCA 152 Modern Danish and Swedish Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Dramas of Strindberg and representative prose works (e.g., Andersen, Jacobsen, and Lagerkvist). All lectures and readings are in English. AUSCA 161 Scandinavian Folk Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the three major genres of Scandinavian folk literature: the fictional folk tale, the legend, and the ballad. Folk literature as a cultural mirror and the impact of folk literature on nineteenth- and twentiethcentury Scandinavian literature are also explored. All lectures and readings are in English. AUSCA 201 Intermediate Norwegian I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). Reading and study of selected texts in Norwegian literature and culture. Composition and conversation are emphasized. Prerequisite: AUSCA 102 or Consent of the Instructor. AUSCA 202 Intermediate Norwegian II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUSCA 201. Prerequisite: AUSCA 201. AUSCA 210 Scandinavian Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Scandinavian Studies. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Modern Languages degree program. Corequisite: Any senior course in Scandinavian Studies that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSCA 210, AUENG 204, AUDRA 228, AUFRE 210, AUGER 210. AUSCA 221 Representations of Gender in Modern Scandinavian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An analysis of the representations of gender in selected works of Scandinavian literature in English translation from 1850 to the present, as well as the role that gender has played in Scandinavian literature in general. Feminist literary and gender theory will be employed to analyze the various texts. AUSCA 231 Scandinavian Culture and Civilization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of Scandinavian life and achievement, past and present, with emphasis on social and cultural conditions against a geographical and historical background. All lectures and readings are in English. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSCA 231 and AUGEO 242. AUSCA 234 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Languages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian languages studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUSCA 235 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Languages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian languages studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUSCA 237 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUSCA 239 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUSCA 241 Viking-Age Prose Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected family and historical sagas (Njal’s saga, Egil’s saga, Grettir’s saga, Laxdæla saga, the Vinland sagas, and others), and an introduction to Viking-age history. All lectures and readings are in English. AUSCA 251 Modern Norwegian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Dramas of Ibsen and representative prose works (e.g. Hamsun, Undset). All lectures and readings are in English. AUSCA 252 Modern Danish and Swedish Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Dramas of Strindberg and representative prose works (e.g., Andersen, Jacobsen, and Lagerkvist). All lectures and readings are in English. AUSCA 261 Scandinavian Folk Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the three major genres of Scandinavian folk literature: the fictional folk tale, the legend, and the ballad. Folk literature as a cultural mirror and the impact of folk literature on nineteenth- and twentiethcentury Scandinavian literature are also explored. All lectures and readings are in English. AUSCA 271 Personal Narratives of the North Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Analysis of personal narratives from the Canadian North and northern Scandinavia, with a focus on texts linking these regions. Narratives written from a variety of perspectives are read, including those of aboriginal peoples, explorers, professionals, adventurers and families. Texts which explore gender roles and gender myths in the North are also examined. Autobiographical theory is employed to analyze the texts. All lectures and readings are in English.

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University of Alberta

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AUSCA 335 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Languages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian languages studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUSCA 337 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUSCA 339 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian literature. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year. AUSCA 371 Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Scandinavian Prose and Drama Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Scandinavian prose and drama from 1720 to the beginning of Expressionism, in the original languages. Special emphasis is placed on Holberg’s comedies, Ibsen’s social dramas, Bjørnson’s peasant novels, Realism, Naturalism, and Neo-Romanticism. Prerequisite: AUSCA 202 or Consent of the Instructor. AUSCA 372 Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Scandinavian Poetry and Short Stories Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Scandinavian poetry and short prose forms from 1720 to the beginnings of Scandinavian poetry and short prose forms from 1720 to the beginnings of Expressionism, in the original languages. Special emphasis is placed on Det Norske Selskab, Carl M. Bellman, Norwegian National Romanticism, Andersen’s fairy tales, post-Romantic poetry in Sweden, and symbolist poetry in Denmark. Prerequisite: AUSCA 202 or Consent of the Instructor. AUSCA 381 Modern Scandinavian Prose and Drama Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Scandinavian prose and drama from 1900 to the present in the original languages. Special emphasis is placed on Strindberg’s plays, and novels by Undset, Hoel, Sandemose, Vesaas, Martin A. Hansen, Sven Delblanc, and others. Prerequisite: AUSCA 202 or Consent of the Instructor. AUSCA 382 Modern Scandinavian Poetry and Short Stories Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Scandinavian poetry, short stories, and essays from 1900 to the present in the original languages, including Arnulf Øverland, Rolf Jacobsen, Inger Hagerup, Otto Gelsted, Benny Andersen, Nels Ferlin, Edith Södergrän, and others. Prerequisite: AUSCA 202 or Consent of the Instructor. AUSCA 401 Directed Study: Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of the Norwegian language. Prerequisite: AUSCA 202 or Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUSCA 403 Directed Reading Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Scandinavian literature as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: A 200-level Scandinavian literature course or Consent of the Instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUSCA 405 Directed Study: Area Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Scandinavian culture as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: AUSCA 231. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

231.57

Augustana Faculty - Sociology, AUSOC Department of Social Sciences Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUSOC 101 Introducing Sociology: Principles and Practice Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to sociology focusing on understanding the relation between the individual and society using concepts like social control, class, role, self, reference group, ideology, and world view. Through the use of some popular films, specific attention is paid to understanding the way we (as particular individuals) are, in taken-for-granted ways, shaped by our membership in large and small groupings. The implications of this shaping for our ideas of freedom, individuality, and morality are debated and examined. AUSOC 103 Introducing Sociology: Institutions and Insight Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to sociology focusing on the relation between social institutions and everyday life. Through an examination of institutions like law, family, education, politics, religion, and economy, the course develops an understanding of themes such as changes in family organization, the relation

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between delinquency and power, and the relation between religion and economy. Prerequisite: AUSOC 101 or 105. AUSOC 105 Social Anthropology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Ethnographic materials from non-Western societies are utilized to examine culture, social structure, and social process. Particular attention is paid to everyday life within various types of societies and how sociological ways of knowing are enriched by an attentiveness to cross-cultural research. AUSOC 200 Young Offenders and the Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Integrative examination of theories of delinquency, the relationship of the young offender to Canadian criminal law, family, drug abuse, child abuse, and recent developments in community-based treatment programs. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 200 and AUCRI 200. AUSOC 218 Sociology of Global and Development Issues Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introductory exploration of the issues of global economic development, global wealth and poverty, and global inequality. Alternative theoretical perspectives are introduced. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 218, and AUIDS 121, 221. AUSOC 222 Canadian Social Issues Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to sociological perspectives on social problems. Various theoretical orientations are applied to contemporary Canadian social issues such as poverty, gender issues, aboriginal rights, human sexuality, and regionalism. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 222 and AUCRI 222. AUSOC 224 Sociology of Deviant Behaviour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Interactionist analysis of processes accompanying the definition of deviance, subculture formation, careers of involvement in deviant activities, and the formal and informal regulation of deviance. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 224 and AUCRI 224. AUSOC 225 Criminology: A Canadian Perspective Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of sociological explanations of crime and criminality. The course focuses on criminality as defined under Canadian criminal law and the traditional legal systems of Canada’s aboriginal peoples. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 225 and AUCRI 225. AUSOC 231 Sociological Studies and Information Literacy Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 1-0-0). Introduction to library research skills in the discipline of Sociology. Prerequisite: Second-year standing in a Sociology degree program. Corequisite: Any senior Sociology course that requires library research. Notes: The corequisite must be taken concurrently. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 231, AUCRI 260, AUPOL 201. AUSOC 232 Theoretic Developments in Sociology I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the origin and the development of classical sociological theory, with particular emphasis on Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. AUSOC 233 Theoretic Developments in Sociology II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the contributions of modern and contemporary sociological theorists, particularly Weber, Parsons, Mead, and others. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103 or 105; and AUSOC 232. AUSOC 236 Research Design and Qualitative Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relation between the method of inquiry and the problem which inquiry addresses. It is designed to acquaint students with numerous approaches to social research, covering all phases of the research process including formulation of a research problem, design of instruments, collection of data and analysis of results. Particular attention is given to qualitative methods, including interviewing, observation, focus groups, and unobtrusive measures. Students will be expected to conduct original research assignments. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. AUSOC 262 Mass Communication and Contemporary Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). What kind of communication is mass communication, and in what ways in particular is this different from other forms of communication? What does it mean to live in an age of mass culture? The construction and character of mass society as one organizational and communicative possibility, using notions of postmodernism and post-industrialism. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in Sociology or consent of the instructor. AUSOC 263 The Social Theory of Community Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Inquiry into the nature of the social, moral, and theoretic ground of human communities, taking as its starting point an examination of the sociological research on the urban/rural difference. Involved in this is an examination of the kinds of social theories that best help us understand the nature of community. For all of the above, Canada is the case study. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105, consent of the instructor. AUSOC 267 Knowledge and Human Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Nature and assessment of knowledge (e.g., values

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A Course Listings

AUSCA 334 Selected Topics in Scandinavian Languages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics in Scandinavian languages studies. Focus and content of each course will vary from year to year.

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Course Listings A

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and belief systems manifest in art, science, technology) in the context of social systems; the connection between competing systems of knowledge and social change. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. AUSOC 271 The Family Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the Western family from ancient Hebrew to contemporary times. It involves the study of the development of the modern nuclear family organization and the controversy over its demise. The relation of the family to wider social structures and society is also considered. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105, consent of the instructor. AUSOC 275 Sex, Gender, and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relation between gender as a social institution and our experiences of sexual identity and gender. The way gender differences are constructed and sustained as part of the reality of everyday life is also examined. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105, consent of the instructor. AUSOC 279 Women in Contemporary Cuba Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Sociological examination of the life of women in contemporary Cuba, focusing on the experience of women within families, workplaces, and education. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 279 and AUSPA 253. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-inCuba Program. AUSOC 283 Sociology of Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of sociological approaches to religion. Religiously grounded moral claims are examined relative to the social functions of religion, religion in relation to other social institutions, and religious experience in everyday life. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. AUSOC 301 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of sociology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 302 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of sociology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUSOC 301 or 401, and consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 303 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and Consent of the Instructor. AUSOC 304 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and consent of the instructor. AUSOC 305 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and consent of the instructor. AUSOC 306 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and consent of the instructor. AUSOC 307 Directed Research I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Original research project as developed by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 308 Directed Research II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Original research project as developed by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 327 Crimes of the Powerful Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Why is it that so much attention is paid to “street crime” while the crimes of the powerful go virtually unpunished and sometimes unnoticed? A comprehensive examination of the prevalence and impact of crime committed by the powerful, including white collar occupational crime, corporate crimes, and crimes committed by the state. Prerequisite: One of AUCRI 160, 224, 225, 353, AUIDS 160, AUPOL 353, AUSOC 224, 225. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 327, 427, AUCRI 327, 427.

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AUSOC 339 Fieldwork Methodology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of fieldwork as it pertains to a qualitative sociology. Topics include epistemology, participant observation, unstructured interviews, managing and interpreting data, and research ethics. Each student completes an original field research project. Prerequisite: AUSOC 236 or AUPOL 200. AUSOC 341 Sociology of Food Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course places food into broader socio-cultural context to better understand why we eat what we eat. Topics will include: patterns of food production, distribution and consumption; the role of rood in relation to embodiment, identities, culture, class, and gender; the socio-cultural and politicaleconomic organization of local, national, and global food systems; the implication of the food system for health, urban-rural relations, ecological sustainability, and social justice; food as a site of power relations, contestation, and social movements. In sum, this course will offer a sociological perspective of the food system and of engagements for its social transformation. Prerequisites: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and Œ3 at a senior level in Sociology. AUSOC 358 Environmental Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theoretical and empirical examination of the connection between the natural environment and the social world. This involves inquiry into the sociological dimensions of some major contemporary environmental problems including air, water and soil pollution, decreased biodiversity, deforestation, climate change, and ozone depletion. Particular attention is paid to the social and political connections among issues of industrialization, development, globalization, inequality, gender, social change and environmental destruction. Prerequisites: Third year standing and one of AUSOC 101, 103 or 105. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 358, 458 and AUENV 358, 458. AUSOC 367 Knowledge and Human Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Nature and assessment of knowledge (e.g., values and belief systems manifest in art, science, technology) in the context of social systems; the connection between competing systems of knowledge and social change. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105. Œ3 at a senior level in Sociology. AUSOC 371 Film and Contemporary Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1L-0). Critical examination of both film as sophisticated text and sociological theories of film and contemporary culture. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; third year standing. AUSOC 377 Contemporary Theories of Gender Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of gender from the perspective of contemporary theories (in particular, feminist theories). The liberal, socialist, radical, and post-structuralist feminist perspectives on gender are addressed. As well, the course looks at gender from ethnomethodological and hermeneutic perspectives. Prerequisite: One of AUSOC 232, 233, 275, any course listed in the Women’s Studies program. AUSOC 391 Social Change from Development to Globalization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of some of the global processes of social change, including theoretical perspectives of development and globalization, such as modernization theory, World Systems theory and sustainable development. Prerequisite: Œ3 at a senior level in Sociology or participation in the Community Service Exchange Program. AUSOC 393 Political Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Political process seen as social action. An examination of the sociological import of themes such as the forms of power (e.g., authority, force), political organization (e.g., democracy, totalitarianism, the nation state), and political processes (e.g., leadership, party formation, political recruitment). Prerequisites: One of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and Œ3 at a senior level in Sociology. AUSOC 401 Directed Reading I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of sociology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 402 Directed Reading II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of sociology as defined by the student and a supervising instructor. Prerequisites: AUSOC 301 or 401, and consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 403 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and consent of the instructor.

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AUSOC 405 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and consent of the instructor. AUSOC 406 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and consent of the instructor. AUSOC 407 Directed Research I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Original research project as developed by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 408 Directed Research II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Original research project as developed by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Notes: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. The course is intended primarily for a student planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology. AUSOC 427 Crimes of the Powerful Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Why is it that so much attention is paid to “street crime” while the crimes of the powerful go virtually unpunished and sometimes unnoticed? A comprehensive examination of the prevalence and impact of crime committed by the powerful, including white collar occupational crime, corporate crimes, and crimes committed by the state. Prerequisite: One of AUCRI 160, 224, 225, 353, AUIDS 160, AUPOL 353, AUSOC 224, 225. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSOC 327, 427, AUCRI 327, 427. AUSOC 437 Symbolic Interactionism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Review of the theoretic contributions that symbolic interactionism has made to sociological inquiry. Taking a review of the conceptual groundwork laid by the pragmatists as its point of departure, the course confronts the work of theorists such as C. H. Cooley, W. I. Thomas, G. H. Mead, and H. Blumer. Classic debates within this tradition are examined relative to more contemporary responses. Prerequisite: Œ6 at a senior level in Sociology. AUSOC 439 Seminar in Contemporary Sociological Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Issues in contemporary theory. Central concepts and arguments proposed by a variety of theorists are examined. Topics covered vary by instructor. A student confronts primary texts. Prerequisite: Œ6 at a senior level in Sociology.

231.58

Augustana Faculty - Spanish, AUSPA Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUSPA 100 Introductory Spanish Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 2-0-0 12 weeks immersion). Introduction to the Spanish language designed to develop functional oral skills and a rudimentary reading and writing ability in Spanish through class instruction, seminars, and immersion experience, including living with Spanish speakers. Prerequisite: Consent of the Development Studies selection committee. Corequisites: One of AUGDS 122, 124, 222, 224, 322, 324; and one of AUGDS 123, 125, 223, 225, 323, 325. Notes: The course is not open to a student with prior university credit in or native knowledge of Spanish. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 100, 101, 102, 103, 104. AUSPA 101 Beginners’ Spanish I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Introduction to the essentials of the Spanish language designed to develop ability in speaking and writing, with a strong emphasis on the development of oral communication skills. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 100, 101 and 103. AUSPA 102 Beginners’ Spanish II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUSPA 101. Prerequisite: AUSPA 101. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 100, 102 and 104. AUSPA 103 Introductory Spanish I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Introduction to the Spanish language designed to develop functional oral skills and a rudimentary reading and writing ability in Spanish through class instruction, seminars, and immersion experience, including

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living with Spanish speakers. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 100, 101 and 103. AUSPA 104 Introductory Spanish II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Continuation of introduction to the Spanish language designed to develop functional oral skills and a rudimentary reading and writing ability in Spanish through class instruction, seminars, and immersion experience, including living with Spanish speakers. Prerequisite: AUSPA 101 or 103. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 100, 102 and 104. AUSPA 200 Intermediate Spanish Communication Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 3-0-0 12 weeks immersion). Stress on oral communication through immersion, including living with native Spanish speakers. A continuation of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and understanding. Hispanic culture that was begun at the first year level of Spanish. Completion of the verb system. Prerequisite: Spanish 30 (or equivalent), AUSPA 100, 102, or 104. Corequisite: Immersion experience. Notes: Currently offered through the PueblaAlberta Community Service Exchange, or “Mi casa es tu casa” with the Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 200, 201, 202, 203, 204. AUSPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Designed to consolidate basic Spanish language skills through systematic grammar review and practice in various language skills. Prerequisite: Spanish 30 (or equivalent), AUSPA 100, 102 or 104. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 200, 201 and 203. AUSPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Continuation of AUSPA 201. Prerequisite: AUSPA 201 or 203. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 200, 202 and 204. AUSPA 203 Intermediate Spanish I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Stress on oral communication through immersion, including living with native Spanish speakers. A continuation of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and understanding Hispanic culture that was begun at the first year level of Spanish. Completion of the verb system and introduction to translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: AUSPA 100, 102 or 104. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 200, 201, 203. AUSPA 204 Intermediate Spanish II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). A continuation of AUSPA 203. Stress on oral communication through immersion, including living with native Spanish speakers. A continuation of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and understanding Hispanic culture that was begun at the first year level of Spanish. Completion of the verb system and introduction to translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: AUSPA 201 or 203. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 200, 202, and 204. AUSPA 230 Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Latin American Fiction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected works in English translation from representative authors such as Borges, Fuentes, and Garcia Márquez. Note: Credit can be obtained from only one of AUSPA 230 and AULIT 201. AUSPA 231 Selected Topics in Modern and Contemporary Latin American Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected twentieth-century literary works in English translation from particular Latin American countries and regions. The country or region on which the course focuses varies from year to year. Note: Credit can be obtained from only one of AUSPA 231 and AULIT 202. AUSPA 238 Selected Topics in Hispanic Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUSPA 239 Selected Topics in Hispanic Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUSPA 240 Development Studies Seminar Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-6s-0). Integrative study of development issues and strategies based on work experiences in rural communities in a Latin American country. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 240, 340, AUGDS 122, 222, 322. AUSPA 241 Development Studies Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). By working in a Latin American country in projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing co-operatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of and integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection

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AUSOC 404 Selected Topics in Sociology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected topics at an advanced level that allows for a focus that is both specific and deep. Prerequisites: Two of AUSOC 101, 103, 105; and consent of the instructor.

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committee. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 241, 341, AUGDS 123, 223, 323.

committee. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 241, 341, AUGDS 123, 223, 323.

AUSPA 250 Integrated Studies (Cuba) Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). This is a mandatory course for all students attending the Augustana-in-Cuba program. The course will integrate various disciplinary considerations with the student’s experiences while living and studying for a semester in Cuba. Themes will include: Cuban society and culture, Cuba in a Latin American context, Cuba and the world. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 250 and AUIDS 292. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program. Costs of the program beyond and including regular tuition are the responsibility of the student. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

AUSPA 402 Directed Study: Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Spanish as defined by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ15 at a senior level in Spanish, including at least Œ3 at the 300 level, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course.

AUSPA 251 Cuban History since 1895 Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Study of Cuban history from the War of Independence (1895-1898) to the present. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 251 and AUHIS 291. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program. AUSPA 252 Cuban Government and Politics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Survey of Cuban state institutions, political ideas, the Organs of Popular Power, the Communist Party of Cuba, and mass organizations. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 252 and AUPOL 239. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-in-Cuba Program. AUSPA 253 Women in Contemporary Cuba Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Sociological examination of the life of women in contemporary Cuba, focusing on the experience of women within families, workplaces and education. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 253 and AUSOC 279. The course is available only as part of the Augustana-inCuba Program. AUSPA 301 Advanced Spanish I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 4-0-0). Designed as the normal sequel to AUSPA 200 or 202, the course is intended to strengthen and consolidate speaking, reading, and writing skills acquired in the aforementioned courses. Prerequisite: AUSPA 200, 202 or 204. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 301 and 303. AUSPA 302 Advanced Spanish II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 8-0-0 in 6 weeks). Designed as the normal sequel to AUSPA 301, the course is intended to strengthen and consolidate speaking, reading, and writing skills acquired in the aforementioned course. Prerequisite: AUSPA 301 or 303. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 302 and 304. AUSPA 303 Advanced Spanish I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing and reading skills acquired in Intermediate Spanish through classroom instruction, excursions and immersion experience, including living with native Spanish speakers. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of Hispanic culture and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUSPA 200, 202 or 204. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 301 and 303.

AUSPA 403 Directed Study: Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-0). Intensive study of a specific area of Spanish as defined by the student and supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Œ15 at a senior level in Spanish, including at least Œ3 at the 300 level, and consent of the instructor. Note: An “Application for Individual Study” must be completed and approved before registration in the course. AUSPA 404 Advanced Spanish III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing and reading skills acquired in Advanced Spanish through classroom instruction, excursions and immersion experience, including living with native Spanish speakers. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of Hispanic culture and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUSPA 302 or AUSPA 304. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America. AUSPA 405 Advanced Spanish IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing and reading skills acquired in Advanced Spanish through classroom instruction, excursions and immersion experience, including living with native Spanish speakers. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of Hispanic culture and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUSPA 402 or AUSPA 404. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America.

231.59

Augustana Faculty - Statistics, AUSTA Department of Science Augustana Faculty

Undergraduate Courses AUSTA 153 Introductory Applied Statistics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to elementary statistical concepts designed to provide an understanding of how statistics can be used to analyze real world phenomena. Emphasis is on applications in the field of business and economics. The student is required to use spreadsheet and other statistical software to analyze and examine statistical data. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSTA 153, 213, 215, AUPSY 213.

AUSPA 304 Advanced Spanish II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, variable). Continuation of AUSPA 303. Designed to develop further the comprehension, speaking, writing and reading skills acquired in Intermediate Spanish through classroom instruction, excursions and immersion experience, including living with native Spanish speakers. Improvement in overall fluency, enhanced knowledge of Hispanic culture and review of key grammatical concepts are integral to the course. Prerequisite: AUSPA 301 or 303. Corequisite: Participation in an Augustana Learning and Beyond offering in Spanish Latin America. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 302 and 304.

AUSTA 213 Statistical Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Frequency distributions, averages, dispersion, simple linear regression and correlation, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, significance tests on means and variances, chi square tests for two way tables, introduction to the analysis of variance. Labs include projects in which a student collects and analyzes real data. Prerequisite: Mathematics 30-1. Notes: The course does not count toward the major in Mathematics and Physics or the minor in Mathematics. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSTA 213, 153, 215, AUPSY 213.

AUSPA 338 Selected Topics in Spanish Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year.

AUSTA 215 Statistical Methods for the Natural Sciences Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Experimental design, data presentation and analysis; descriptive statistics, probability distributions and statistical hypothesis testing; parametric and non-parametric tests, correlation and regression; use of statistical software. Prerequisites: Mathematics 30-1; one of AUBIO 110, 130, AUCHE 110, AUCSC 110, 111, AUENV 120, AUGEO 120, AUMAT 110, 111, 116, 120, AUPHY 102, 104, 110. Notes: The course does not count toward the major in Mathematics and Physics or the minor in Mathematics. Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSTA 153, 213, 215, AUPSY 213.

AUSPA 339 Selected Topics in Spanish Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced study of selected authors, works, periods, and critical approaches. Focus and content of each course are determined by student and faculty interests, and vary from year to year. AUSPA 340 Development Studies Seminar Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-6s-0). Integrative study of development issues and strategies based on work experiences in rural communities in a Latin American country. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection committee. Notes: Credit may be obtained for only one of AUSPA 240, 340, AUGDS 122, 222, 322. AUSPA 341 Development Studies Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). By working in a Latin American country in projects dealing with such issues as health care, water aid, sustainable farming, developing co-operatives, and education, the student becomes familiar with various aspects of and integrated approach to development. Prerequisite: Consent of the selection

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231.60

Augustana Faculty - World Literatures, AULIT Department of Fine Arts Augustana Faculty

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University of Alberta

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Department of Biochemistry. The results of the research project will be presented in a poster. This course is available only as a six week Spring or Summer session course. Prerequisites: Credit in at least one 300-level BIOCH course and consent of the Department. BIOCH 398 may not be taken for credit if credit has been obtained in BIOCH 498 or 499.

AULIT 202 Selected Topics in Modern and Contemporary Latin American Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of selected twentieth-century literary works, in English translation, from particular Latin American countries and regions. The country or region on which the course focuses varies from year to year. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AULIT 202 and AUSPA 231.

L BIOCH 401 Biochemistry Laboratory Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-0-8). Laboratory course in modern biochemical techniques. Designed for Biochemistry Honors and Specialization students in their third or fourth year. Other interested students may enrol subject to space limitations. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B-, and consent of Department.

231.61

Biochemistry, BIOCH Department of Biochemistry Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

Undergraduate Courses Notes (1) BIOCH 200, 310, 320, 330, 401, 410, 420, 430, 441, 450, 455, 460 can be used by students in the Faculty of Science as science courses. (2) Courses in clinical biochemistry are listed under Medical Laboratory Science. O BIOCH 200 Introductory Biochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the fundamental principles of biochemistry. Protein structure and function; lipids and the structure of biological membranes; nucleotides and the structure of nucleic acids; bioenergetics and the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and nitrogen; the integration and regulation of cellular metabolism. Prerequisites: CHEM 101 and CHEM 261 or 164, or SCI 100. CHEM 261 may be taken as a corequisite with permission of the department. Notes: (1) This course is designed for students who require a one-term introduction to the fundamental principles of biochemistry and for students who intend to take further courses in biochemistry. (2) BIOCH 200 may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in any of BIOCH 203, 205, or 220. BIOCH 299 Research Opportunity Program Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 0-0-3). A credit/no-credit course under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biochemistry. Normally taken after completion of a minimum of Œ30 but not more than Œ60 in a program in the Faculty of Science. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.7 or higher, BIOCH 200, and consent of department. Normally taken in addition to a full course load. Note: Application does not guarantee a position. Credit may be obtained twice. BIOCH 310 Bioenergetics and Metabolism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course is designed to enable rigorous study of the molecular mechanisms in bioenergetics and metabolism. It covers: the principles of bioenergetics; the reactions and pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism, and their regulation; oxidative phosphorylation; the integration and hormonal regulation of mammalian metabolism. Prerequisites: BIOCH 200, CHEM 102 (or SCI 100) and CHEM 263 with a minimum GPA of 2.70 for these three courses. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 203 or 205. In the case of over-subscription, preference will be given to students enrolled in programs with a requirement for this course. BIOCH 320 Structure and Catalysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course is designed to illustrate, in detail, the relationships between structure and function in biological molecules. It covers: the structure of proteins; experimental techniques used to study proteins; selected illustrations of protein function; enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and regulation; structural carbohydrates and glycobiology; the structure of lipids; biological membranes and mechanisms of transport. Prerequisites: BIOCH 200, CHEM 102 (or SCI 100) and CHEM 263 with a minimum GPA of 2.70 for these three courses. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 203. In the case of over-subscription, preference will be given to students enrolled in programs with a requirement for this course.

L BIOCH 410 Signal Transduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Principles of the biochemistry of cell communication and signal transduction through receptor activation, the generation of second messengers, and the control of protein modifications. The course will emphasize the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cell migration, division and death. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310, 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B-, or consent of the Department. Intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 510). L BIOCH 420 Protein Chemistry, Structure, and Function Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Protein chemistry and purification. The intra- and intermolecular forces that determine protein structure. Principles of protein folding and dynamics. Enzyme mechanisms and ligand binding interactions. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 520). BIOCH 425 Proteomics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1/2). An advanced course focusing on the analysis of protein function and protein-protein interactions within the context of the entire protein complement of a cell. Some aspects of protein structure as it pertains to the principles of protein-protein interactions will be covered along with genetic and biochemical methods for the analysis of protein complexes, protein interaction networks and system wide protein identification and dynamics. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and BIOCH 330 with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in these courses. L BIOCH 430 Biochemistry of Eukaryotic Gene Expression Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The organization and expression at the molecular level of information encoded in the nucleic acids of eukaryotic cells. The focus will be on genome structure and the regulation of gene expression at the levels of transcription, post-transcriptional processing, translation, post-translational modification and protein sorting. Recombinant DNA technologies and genetic engineering will be discussed as methods for studying the cellular processing of genetic information. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 530). L BIOCH 441 Structure and Function of Biological Membranes Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the structure and function of biological membranes. Topics include the structure, properties and composition of biomembranes, characterization and structural principles of membrane lipids and proteins, lateral and transverse asymmetry, dynamics, lipid-protein interactions, membrane enzymology, permeability, and biogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 541). L BIOCH 450 The Molecular Biology of Mammalian Viruses Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course will focus on virus structure, replication, and interaction with host cells at the molecular level. Lytic viruses with single- or double-stranded DNA or RNA genomes will be discussed, as will the mechanisms of viral oncogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 550).

BIOCH 330 Nucleic Acids and Molecular Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the biochemistry of nucleic acids. It covers: the structure and properties of nucleotides and nucleic acids; DNA-based information technologies; genes and chromosome structure; molecular mechanisms in DNA replication, repair, and recombination; RNA metabolism; protein synthesis and targeting; the regulation of gene expression. Prerequisites: BIOCH 200, CHEM 102 (or SCI 100), and CHEM 263, with a minimum GPA of 2.70 for these three courses. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 205. In the case of over-subscription, preference will be given to students enrolled in programs with a requirement for this course.

L BIOCH 455 Biochemistry of Lipids and Lipoproteins Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced course focusing on specific aspects of the regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Topics include the transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms governing the synthesis and degradation of important enzymes, lipids, and lipid transport molecules; the role of lipid mediators in signaling pathways and protein modification; the assembly and dynamics of lipoproteins and biological membranes; genetic disruptions of lipid regulatory proteins such as cell surface receptors leading to human disease. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310 with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 555).

BIOCH 398 Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-8). Supervised research within a laboratory in the

BIOCH 465 Methods in Molecular Biophysics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of biophysical methods used in the

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B Course Listings

AULIT 201 Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Latin American Fiction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Selected works in English translation from representative authors such as Borges, Fuentes, and García Márquez. Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of AULIT 201 and AUSPA 230.

Course Listings B

584

University of Alberta

characterization and structural determination of biological macromolecules, from ensemble measurements to single-molecule detection. Topics include mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy, light microscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, molecular dynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Emphasis is on using techniques in evaluating structure-function relationships through the discussion of representative macromolecular systems. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 with a minimum grade of B- or consent of the Department. This course cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 460. L BIOCH 481 Design and Construction of Synthetic Biological Systems  I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course explores both the opportunities and challenges of synthetic life by providing a practical and theoretical introduction to this new discipline through lectures, class discussion, assigned reading and case studies. Topics covered include: natural vs artificial design of genetic circuits and devices, experimental aspects of gene and gene network construction, metabolic network design and evaluation, and the role of computer modeling in design creation, testing and optimization. The availability of BIOCH 481 to students from non-biochemistry backgrounds emphasizes the highly interdisciplinary nature of the field. Prerequisites: Registration in the Faculties of Science or Engineering and a minimum GPA 3.3 (or consent of the department). L BIOCH 482 Design and Construction of Synthetic Biological Systems  II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-0-4). Designed to prepare students for participation in the iGEM Competition (International Genetically Engineered Machines) through team-based problem solving. Teams composed of individuals from different programs are expected to: 1) Identify a relevant problem within the realm of synthetic biology. 2) Devise a credible and detailed plan to solve an aspect of the problem. 3) Demonstrate the feasibility of the design by computer modeling. 4) Evaluate the costs of success in terms of the financial, human and technological resources that are needed for the timely completion of the project. 5) Develop a plan to acquire the resources that are required for a successful outcome. 6) Produce a report and presentation. Although students are expected to exhibit a high level of independence and creativity, they can count on considerable guidance and support from participating faculty. Prerequisites: BIOCH 481 (or consent of the department). BIOCH 495 Special Topics in Biochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Covers specialized topics of current interest to advanced undergraduates in Biochemistry programs. Consult the Department for details about current offerings. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. BIOCH 497 International Directed Research Project Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, variable). Supervised research within an international laboratory assigned by the Department of Biochemistry, to be carried out over one term (Spring or Summer). The results of the research project will be presented in an oral presentation. Can be taken as a science elective but not as a substitute for required courses in biochemistry. Can be taken for credit in addition to BIOCH 498 and BIOCH 499. Prerequisites: BIOCH 401 and consent of the Department. L BIOCH 498 Directed Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-8). Supervised research within a laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, to be carried out over one term (Fall or Winter). The results of the research project will be presented in a short seminar. This course is not a substitute for required courses in Biochemistry. Can be taken for credit prior to BIOCH 499. L BIOCH 499 Directed Research Project Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-0-8). Supervised research within a laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, to be carried out over both terms of Fall/Winter. The results of the research project will be presented in a final written report and an oral presentation. This course is required for the Honors program, but can be taken as a science elective by students in the Specialization program. Prerequisites: BIOCH 401 and consent of the Department.

Graduate Courses BIOCH 510 Signal Transduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Principles of the biochemistry of cell communication and signal transduction through receptor activation, the generation of second messengers, and the control of protein modifications. The course will emphasize the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cell migration, division and death. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310, 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B-, or consent of the Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 410, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 410. BIOCH 520 Protein Chemistry, Structure, and Function Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Protein chemistry and purification. The intra- and intermolecular forces that determine protein structure. Principles of protein folding and dynamics. Enzyme mechanisms and ligand binding interactions. Prerequisites:

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BIOCH 320, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 420, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 420. BIOCH 525 Proteomics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1/2). An advanced course focusing on the analysis of protein function and protein-protein interactions within the context of the entire protein complement of a cell. Some aspects of protein structure as it pertains to the principles of protein-protein interactions will be covered along with genetic and biochemical methods for the analysis of protein complexes, protein interaction networks and system wide protein identification and dynamics. This course is intended for students in Biochemistry but students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Prerequisites: BIOCH 420 and BIOCH 430 or their equivalent with a minimum GPA of 3.2 in these courses. BIOCH 530 Biochemistry of Eukaryotic Gene Expression Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The organization and expression at the molecular level of information encoded in the nucleic acids of eukaryotic cells. The focus will be on genome structure and the regulation of gene expression at the levels of transcription, post-transcriptional processing, translation, post-translational modification and protein sorting. Recombinant DNA technologies and genetic engineering will be discussed as methods for studying the cellular processing of genetic information. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 430, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 430. BIOCH 541 Structure and Function of Biological Membranes Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the structure and function of biological membranes. Topics include the structure, properties and composition of biomembranes, characterization and structural principles of membrane lipids and proteins, lateral and transverse asymmetry, dynamics, lipid-protein interactions, membrane enzymology, permeability, and biogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 441, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 441. BIOCH 550 The Molecular Biology of Mammalian Viruses Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course will focus on virus structure, replication, and interaction with host cells at the molecular level. Lytic viruses with single- or double-stranded DNA or RNA genomes will be discussed, as will the mechanisms of viral oncogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 450, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 450. BIOCH 555 Biochemistry of Lipids and Lipoproteins Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced course focusing on specific aspects of the regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Topics include the transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms governing the synthesis and degradation of important enzymes, lipids, and lipid transport molecules; the role of lipid mediators in signaling pathways and protein modification; the assembly and dynamics of lipoproteins and biological membranes; genetic disruptions of lipid regulatory proteins such as cell surface receptors leading to human disease. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310 with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 455, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 455. BIOCH 565 Methods in Molecular Biophysics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of biophysical methods used in the characterization and structural determination of biological macromolecules, from ensemble measurements to single-molecule detection. Topics include mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy, light microscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, molecular dynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Emphasis is on using techniques in evaluating structure-function relationships through the discussion of representative macromolecular systems. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 465, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 460 or 465. BIOCH 609 Macromolecular Structure Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Principles of X-ray crystallography as applied to the study of protein and nucleic acid structure. Practical aspects of diffraction and structure solution are demonstrated by a collaborative study of a suitable small molecule of biological interest. Designed for senior honors and graduate students. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Maximum enrolment of 10 students. Offered in alternate years.

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University of Alberta

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BIOCH 623 Special Topics in Research on Polynucleotides Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s-0). This course is a journal club and discussion group in which current research topics on nucleic acids are discussed. Specific talks range from biochemistry, genetics and microbiology to nuclear biology and clinical aspects. BIOCH 626 Special Topics in Protein Research Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s-0). Seminar course for advanced students. Detailed consideration is given to recent advances in research on protein structure and function and mechanism of enzyme action. Prerequisite: BIOCH 420 or consent of Department. BIOCH 630 Selected Topics in Modern Molecular Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Directed reading and seminar course, based on papers taken from the recent literature of molecular biology. Students critically discuss the papers and give oral presentations. Note: designed for graduate students; offered yearly. Prerequisite: BIOCH 530 and consent of the Department. BIOCH 640 Special Topics in Research on Biomembranes Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s-0). Seminar course for advanced students covering selected topics from the current literature in the field of membrane structure and function. Prerequisite: BIOCH 441 or consent of Department. BIOCH 641 Selected Topics on the Structure and Function of Biological Membranes Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Directed reading and seminar course on the structure and function of biological membranes. Topics include membrane biogenesis, bioenergetics, transport and structural aspects of membrane lipids and proteins. Prerequisite: BIOCH 441 or consent of the Department. BIOCH 650 Signal Transduction Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s-0). A journal club and discussion group addressing topics in the general area of signalling mechanisms that control cell activation, growth, apoptosis and vesicle trafficking. Specific talks range from biochemistry, genetics and microbiology to molecular biology and clinical aspects. Prerequisite: BIOCH 410/510 or consent of Department. BIOCH 651 Special Topics in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s-0). Seminar for advanced students covering selected topics from the current literature in the field of lipid and lipoprotein research. Prerequisite: BIOCH 555 or consent of Department. BIOCH 655 Advances in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 1-2s-0). Recent developments and use of the current literature are emphasized. Topics include regulation of lipid metabolism, intracellular lipid trafficking, regulation of lipoprotein secretion, lipid transfer among lipoproteins, reverse cholesterol transport, and atherosclerosis. Prerequisite: BIOCH 455, or 555, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years. BIOCH 670 Recent Advances in Biochemistry Œ4 (fi 8) (two term, 0-1s-0). A seminar course on topics of current interest in biochemistry. Students will contribute to a presentation based on recent developments published in first rate journals. Attendance at all seminars is expected. Note: open only to graduate students in Biochemistry. BIOCH 671 Recent Advances in Biochemistry Œ4 (fi 8) (two term, 0-1s-0). A seminar course on topics of current interest in biochemistry. Students will contribute a presentation on their research project that includes original data. Attendance at all seminars is expected. Prerequisite: BIOCH 670 or consent of the Department. Note: open only to graduate students in Biochemistry.

métabolisme des glucides, des lipides et de l’azote; intégration et régulation du métabolisme cellulaire. Préalable(s): CHIM 101; CHIM 261 ou CHEM 164 ou SCI 100. Note(s): (1) Ce cours s’adresse aux étudiants qui doivent suivre Œ3 sur les principes de base de la biochimie, et aux étudiants qui comptent suivre des cours de biochimie plus avancés. (2) Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour BIOCH 203, 205 ou 220.

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Bioinformatics, BIOIN Department of Biological Sciences Faculty of Science

Undergraduate Courses O BIOIN 301 Bioinformatics I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Introduction to computational tools and databases used in the collection and analysis of sequence data and other analytical data from high-throughput molecular biology studies. Students will use existing tools, and learn the underlying algorithms and their limitations. Prerequisite: any 200-level Biological Sciences course or consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOIN 301 and BIOL 501. O BIOIN 401 Bioinformatics II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Advanced topics in bioinformatics will be covered. A major part of the course will be devoted to team-based projects involving writing novel bioinformatics tools to deal with current problems in bioinformatics. Prerequisites: BIOIN 301, a 300-level CMPUT course and a 300-level GENET course. (Offered jointly by the Departments of Computing Science and Biological Sciences). [Biological Sciences].

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Biologie, BIOLE Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle BIOLE 107 Introduction à la biologie cellulaire Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-1s-3). Introduction à la structure et au fonctionnement de la cellule. Les principaux sujets étudiés comprennent les cellules procaryotes et eucaryotes, la bioénergétique, comment les cellules se reproduisent et comment l’information génétique est emmagasinée et utilisée à travers les processus de réplication de l’ADN, de transcription et de traduction. Préalable(s): Biologie 30 et Chimie 30. Note: BIOLE 107 n’est pas un préalable pour BIOLE 108. BIOLE 108 Introduction à la diversité biologique Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-1s-3). Examine les grandes lignées de la vie sur la Terre. Un survol des principes de l’évolution et de la classification, l’histoire de la vie et les adaptations clefs des procaryotes, protistes, eumycètes, végétaux et animaux. Les laboratoires examinent la diversité de formes et de fonctions biologiques, et introduisent l’étudiant à la collecte de données et à la rédaction scientifique. Préalable: Biologie 30. Note: BIOLE 107 n’est pas un préalable pour BIOLE 108. BIOLE 201 Biologie cellulaire des eucaryotes Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Une dissection structurale et fonctionnelle de la cellule eucaryote. Détection de molécules spécifiques au niveau ultrastructural; structure et fonction de la membrane plasmique; rôle du cytosquelette dans le transport intracellulaire, la mitose et la cytocinèse; le système endomembranaire, le ciblage des protéines, l’exocytose et l’endocytose; structure et fonction du noyau; contrôle du cycle cellulaire et cancer. Préalable(s): BIOLE 107 et un cours de CHIM de niveau 100, ou SCI 100. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour CELL 201.

BIOCH 675 Magnetic Resonance in Biology and Medicine II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Designed for advanced honors and graduate students interested in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to biological systems. Topics include quantum mechanical basis of NMR, multinuclear multidimensional NMR experiments, NMR relaxation theory, new NMR applications. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Offered in alternate years.

BIOLE 207 La génétique moléculaire et l’hérédité Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-1s-3). Les principes chromosomiques et moléculaires de la transmission et du fonctionnement des gènes; la construction de cartes génétiques et physiques des gènes et des génomes; les protocoles utilisés pour isoler des gènes spécifiques. Seront aussi à l’étude les exemples de mécanismes régulateurs pour l’expression de matériel génétique chez les procaryotes et les eucaryotes. Préalable(s): BIOLE 107 ou SCI 100.

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BIOLE 208 Les principes de l’écologie Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-3). L’écologie est l’étude scientifique des interactions entre les organismes et leur environnement selon une hiérarchie de niveaux d’organisation: les individus, les populations, les communautés et les écosystèmes. Destiné à donner à l’étudiant une vue générale des concepts de base en écologie, ce cours peut aussi servir de préparation à des cours plus avancés. Dans les laboratoires, l’accent sera sur le recueil, l’analyse et l’interprétation des données provenant d’expériences écologiques afin d’illustrer et compléter les notes du cours. Les exemples seront tirés d’une vaste étendue d’organismes et de systèmes. Préalable(s): BIOLE 108 ou SCI 100.

Biochimie, BIOCM Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle BIOCM 200 Introduction á la biochimie I Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Introduction aux principes de base de la biochimie. Structures et fonctions des protéines; lipides et structure des membranes biologiques; nucléotides et structures des acides nucléiques; bioénergétique et

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B Course Listings

BIOCH 620 Selected Topics in Protein Structure, Function, and Regulation Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Directed reading and seminar course, based on papers taken from recent literature of protein research. Students critically discuss the papers and give oral presentations to the class. Designed for graduate students. Prerequisite: BIOCH 420 or equivalent, or consent of Department.

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University of Alberta

Course Listings B

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BIOLE 315 La biologie: une perspective historique Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Un survol des fondements scientifiques des découvertes biologiques jusqu’au milieu du 20ième siècle. Les étudiants doivent avoir une compréhension sophistiquée des concepts modernes de la biologie, écrire deux dissertations sur des sujets précis et participer activement dans les discussions en classe. Préalable: Un cours de niveau 300 en science biologique. BIOLE 321 Mécanismes de l’évolution Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Les principales caractéristiques du processus évolutif, incluant les données fossiles, les fondements de la génétique des populations, la sélection naturelle, l’adaptation et la spéciation. Préalable(s): BIOLE 108 et 207. SCI 100 peut remplacer BIOLE 108. BIOLE 380 Analyse génétique des populations Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-1s-0). Application de la biologie moléculaire à l’étude de la systématique, de la structure des populations naturelles, des systèmes d’accouplement et de la criminalistique. Les sujets discutés incluent les techniques de détection de la variation génétique des populations naturelles, l’analyse phylogénétique de données moléculaires, les modèles mathématiques de la structure des populations, l’analyse de paternité et les empreintes génétiques. Préalable: BIOLE 207. BIOLE 321 est recommandé.

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Overview of evolutionary principles and classification, the history of life, and the key adaptations of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. Laboratories survey the diversity of biological form and function, and introduce students to data collection and scientific writing. Prerequisite: Biology 30. Note: BIOL 107 is not a prerequisite for BIOL 108. BIOL 107 and 108 can be taken in either term. O BIOL 201 Eukaryotic Cellular Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A structural and functional dissection of a eukaryotic cell. Detection of specific molecules at the ultrastructural level; plasma membrane structure and function; cytoskeleton involvement in intracellular transport, mitosis, and cytokinesis; the endomembrane system, protein targeting, exocytosis and endocytosis; nuclear structure and function; cell cycle control and cancer. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 and a 100-level Chemistry course, or SCI 100. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in CELL 201, in addition, not available to students currently enrolled in CELL 201. O BIOL 207 Molecular Genetics and Heredity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). The chromosomal and molecular basis for the transmission and function of genes. The construction of genetic and physical maps of genes and genomes. Strategies for the isolation of specific genes. Examples of regulatory mechanisms for the expression of the genetic material in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 or SCI 100.

BIOLE 381 Les humains, la pollution et l’environnement Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Impact des polluants anthropogéniques sur les écosystèmes. Au départ, ce cours étudie la croissance de la population humaine et l’extraction de ressources non durables, ensuite il examine le transport des polluants dans l’atmosphère et la biosphère, la détection des polluants et leur impact écologique. Des données sur certains polluants (incluant bioxyde de carbone, ressources alimentaires, émissions d’acides, pesticides, bouleversements endocriniens, mercure et autres métaux, déversements d’huile, radiation) seront utilisées pour discuter l’importance pour les humains des écosystèmes, politiques et réglementations environnementales en Alberta et ailleurs au Canada. Préalable: BIOLE 208.

O BIOL 208 Principles of Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Ecology is the scientific study of interactions between organisms and their environment in a hierarchy of levels of organization: individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Provides a comprehensive survey of general concepts that can stand alone or serve as preparation for advanced courses in ecology. Labs emphasize collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from ecological experiments and field studies to illustrate and complement lecture material. Examples are drawn from a broad range of organisms and systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 108 or SCI 100. Open to students in the BSc Forestry and BSc Forest Business Management program once they have completed REN  R 120 and REN R 205.

BIOLE 490 Étude dirigée Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 0-0-6). L’inscription dépendra d’une entente préalable entre l’étudiant et un professeur qui serait prêt à superviser le projet. Des crédits peuvent être obtenus plus d’une fois pour ce cours. Préalable(s): Œ3 de niveau 300 en sciences biologiques et l’approbation du Vice-doyen aux affaires académiques. Note: L’accès à ce cours peut être limité par la disponibilité d’un superviseur de recherche.

O BIOL 298 Understanding Biological Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An introduction to the process of scientific research including the different approaches to research within biology, formulating research questions, hands-on skill development, experimental design, data collection and analysis, critical thinking, communication of findings, ethics, and career opportunities. Students will attend lectures and selected seminars, and participate in biological research under the supervision of an academic staff member in the Department of Biological Sciences. Open to students in Honors and Specialization Programs in the Department of Biological Sciences and/or with consent of department. This course is designed for and required of students wishing to obtain a Research Certificate in Science (Biological Sciences); all students must apply for admission. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 or 108 or SCI 100. See the Biological Sciences website for more details at www.biology.ualberta.ca/courses.

BIOLE 498 Projet de recherche Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 0-0-6). Recherche dirigée dans le laboratoire d’un membre du personnel académique en biologie. Des crédits peuvent être obtenus plus d’une fois pour ce cours. Préalable(s): Œ3 de niveau 300 en sciences biologiques et l’approbation du superviseur de recherche. Note: L’accès à ce cours peut être limité par la disponibilité d’un superviseur de recherche. BIOLE 499 Projet de recherche Œ6 (fi 12) (aux deux semestres, 0-0-6). Recherche dirigée dans le laboratoire d’un membre du personnel académique en biologie. La complétion de ce projet requiert une présentation orale et un rapport écrit sur le projet de recherche. Préalable(s): Œ3 de niveau 300 en sciences biologiques et l’approbation du superviseur de recherche. Note: L’accès à ce cours peut être limité par la disponibilité d’un superviseur de recherche.

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Biology (Biological Sciences), BIOL Department of Biological Sciences Faculty of Science

Notes (1) See the following sections for listings of other Biological Sciences courses: Bioinformatics (BIOIN); Botany (BOT); Entomology (ENT); Genetics (GENET); Microbiology (MICRB); Zoology (ZOOL). (2) See the following sections for listings of other relevant courses: Interdisciplinary Studies (INT D); Immunology and Infection (IMIN); Marine Science (MA SC); Paleontology (PALEO).

Undergraduate Courses

O BIOL 299 Research Opportunity Program Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 0-0-3). A credit/no-credit course under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally taken in the second year. Recommended that students have a minimum of Œ30 but not more than Œ60 in a program in the Faculty of Science. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.5 or higher, credit in BIOL 107 or 108 or SCI 100 and/or consent of Department. Normally taken in addition to a full course load. Project and course information available at ROP website or Department of Biological Sciences. Note: Application does not guarantee an ROP position. Credit may be obtained twice. O BIOL 315 Biology: An Historical Perspective Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An outline of the scientific foundations of biological discovery to the mid-20th century. Students must have a sophisticated understanding of modern concepts in biology, be prepared to write a major essay on a focused topic, deliver an oral presentation and participate actively in class discussion. Prerequisite: a third-year course in the biological sciences or consent of instructor. O BIOL 321 Mechanisms of Evolution Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Discusses the major features of the evolutionary process, including the fossil record, basic population genetics, variation, natural selection, adaptation, and speciation. Prerequisites: BIOL 108 and any 200-level Biological Sciences course. SCI 100 may be used in lieu of BIOL 108.

O BIOL 107 Introduction to Cell Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). An introduction to cell structure and function. Major topics include the molecules and structures that comprise prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, the mechanisms by which energy is harvested and used by cells, how cells reproduce, and how information is stored and used within a cell via the processes of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Prerequisites: Biology 30 and Chemistry 30. Note: BIOL 107 is not a prerequisite for BIOL 108. BIOL 107 and 108 can be taken in either term.

O BIOL 322 Diversity and Evolution of Microbial Life Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). The diversity of microscopic life forms, both prokaryotic (bacteria and archaea) and eukaryotic (protists, fungi, phytoplankton), will be explored. The evolutionary forces responsible for this diversity will be described in detail and contrasted to those at work in macroscopic eukaryotes. Students will learn about the molecular methods used to identify and classify both culturable and non-culturable microbes, and genetically characterize entire populations. Prerequisites: BIOL 107 and 108 or SCI 100, and a 200-level Biological Sciences course. MICRB 265 recommended.

O BIOL 108 Introduction to Biological Diversity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). Examines the major lineages of life on Earth.

O BIOL 330 Introduction to Biological Data Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Expands on prior introductions to the scientific

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O BIOL 331 Population Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Principles of population ecology as they apply to plants and animals; population consequences of variation among individuals; habitat structure and population structure; habitat selection and foraging theory; life tables, demography, and the evolution of life history patterns; population dynamics; interactions among organisms (predation, competition, mutualism); and population regulation. Prerequisites: BIOL 208; any one of MATH 113, 115, 120, 125 or SCI 100; STAT 151. O BIOL 332 Community Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-3s-0). Principles of community ecology, applied to plants and animals. The nature of communities, functional groups and rarity; niche theory and competition; disturbance and other alternatives to competition; food webs (predation, herbivory and disease); diversity (determinants, functional consequences and gradients); island communities. Prerequisites: BIOL 208; STAT 151; and any one of MATH 113, 115, 120, 125 or SCI 100. May not be taken for credit if credit already obtained in ZOOL 332. O BIOL 333 Wetland Ecology and Management Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Introduction to the ecology of wetland ecosystems, communities and plants. Major topics include landscape features, hydrological and chemical cycles of wetlands, wetland communities and major flora and fauna. Emphasis will be on wetlands in Western Canada including the bog, fen and marsh systems in boreal Alberta, prairie and montane wetlands. Loss or alteration of wetlands due to human activity is documented. A field trip is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. Credit may be obtained in only one of BOT 333 and BIOL 333. O BIOL 335 Principles of Systematics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the principles, methods, and applications of biological systematics, including reconstruction of phylogenies, creation of synthetic and cladistic classifications, historical interpretation of geographic distributions, and applications in evolutionary biology. Each student will analyze phylogenetic data and write a description of a species and its relationships. Prerequisites: BIOL 108 or SCI 100 and a 200-level Biological Sciences course; BIOL 321 strongly recommended. O BIOL 340 Global Biogeochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An introduction to biogeochemical cycles in the environment. Discusses processes and reactions governing cycles in the atmosphere, lithosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, freshwater wetlands and lakes, river estuaries, and the oceans. Outlines the global cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Group discussions will incorporate current topics in anthropogenic alterations of natural cycles that lead to ecosystem degradation. Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or SCI 100 and BIOL 208; MICRB 265 strongly recommended. O BIOL 341 Ecotoxicology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An overview of the adverse effects of chemicals or physical agents on biological systems in an ecological context. This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding biological effects and their assessment. Prerequisites: BIOL 208, ZOOL 241, and CHEM 164 or 261, or instructor consent. O BIOL 361 Marine Science Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An introduction to marine science and marine biology including history of marine exploration, essential features of the physical marine environment, a survey of major marine communities and adaptations of the organisms that live in each, overviews of selected groups of marine organisms (e.g., marine mammals), and human impact on the oceans. Recommended as preparation for courses offered through the Bamfield Marine Station (see courses listed under MA SC). Prerequisite: ZOOL 250 or BIOL 208. O BIOL 364 Freshwater Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-0). An introduction to the ecology of freshwater ecosystems. Lectures will examine the roles of biota in ecological patterns and processes in lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams, emphasizing north-temperate and boreal regions. Seminars will focus on recent papers from the primary literature. Designed to stand-alone or to provide a biological complement to BIOL 464. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. O BIOL 365 Methods in Freshwater Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 1-0-3). A practical course introducing students to techniques used in the field and lab to biomonitor lakes and streams. Topics covered will include plankton production and composition, fish and benthos community structure, herbivory and predation, and paleolimnology. The laboratory component includes field trips and independent research projects. Pre or corequisite: BIOL 364 or permission of instructor.

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O BIOL 366 Northern Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Examines the ecology of boreal, arctic, and alpine ecosystems, including postglacial history, climate, geology, nutrient cycling and energy flow in forests, wetlands, lakes and marine systems, animal and plant adaptations to cold and current human impacts. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. O BIOL 367 Conservation Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course introduces the principles of conservation biology with an emphasis on ecological processes operating at population, community and ecosystem levels of organization. Threats to biological diversity, ranging from species introductions to habitat destruction will be discussed along with conservation solutions ranging from the design of protected areas through conservation legislation. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. Credit cannot be obtained in both BIOL 367 and REN R 364. O BIOL 380 Genetic Analysis of Populations Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-0). Application of molecular biology to the study of systematics, structure of natural populations, mating systems, and forensics. Among the topics discussed are molecular techniques used to detect genetic variation in natural populations, methods to construct phylogenies using molecular data, mathematical models of population structure, paternity analysis, and DNA fingerprinting. Prerequisite: BIOL 207. BIOL 321 recommended. O BIOL 381 A Planet in Crisis Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course examines how humankind’s collective activities, including altering the climate, have significantly affected the natural planetary balance. We will discuss human population growth and unsustainable resource use; the movement of pollutants through the atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere; the impacts these stressors have on ecosystem services and human health; and how certain impacts have been and can be mitigated by environmental policies and laws. Groups of students will produce a short video documentary on a topic related to how humans impact their environment. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. BIOL 384 Global Change and Ecosystems Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Ecological impacts of climate change and largescale human activities on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The focus of this course is to learn to write brief technical summaries of current environment issues, in a fashion that can be understood by an educated citizen. Topics such as climate change, water management projects, invasion of exotic species and national parks management are presented as the forum to evaluate options, trade-offs and solutions to environmental social issues. Prerequisites: BIOL 208 or consent of Instructor. BOT 205 recommended. O BIOL 391 Techniques in Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-6). A laboratory course introducing students to techniques in gene manipulation, protein expression and bioinformatics by following a gene through a thematic series of molecular manipulations. Restricted to Honors and Specialization students in Biological Sciences and consent of instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 207 and BIOCH 200. Not to be taken by students currently enrolled in GENET 420 or with credit in GENET 420. Credit can be obtained for only one of BIOL 391, IMIN 391 or MMI 391. O BIOL 392 Laboratory Techniques in Molecular Ecology and Systematics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-1s-6). A laboratory course introducing students to current molecular biology techniques and associated analyses used to study population genetics, systematics, and evolutionary biology in natural populations. Students will develop microsatellite marker systems and use them to examine the genetic structure of a natural population. A comparative bioinformatic approach will be used to generate sequence data to investigate the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate gene analysis and in phylogenetic inference. Prerequisite: BIOL 207, 208 and consent of instructor, corequisite: BIOL 380. Note: BIOL 392 and 592 cannot both be taken for credit. O BIOL 398 Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their third year of study. Successful completion of this course requires a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 200-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Credit for this course may be obtained only once. O BIOL 399 Research Project Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-0-6). Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their third year of study. Successful completion of this course requires a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 200-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Credit for this course may be obtained only once. O BIOL 400 Industrial Internship Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Required by all students who have just completed a Biological Sciences Industrial Internship Program. Must be completed during the first academic term following return to full-time studies. Note: A grade of F to A+

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B Course Listings

method and examines the steps involved in the planning, collection, organization, analysis and presentation of biological data. Classes will explore the types of data used to answer a variety of biological questions and will review several different sampling designs, assess the benefits and limitations of various data types for scientific inference, and integrate the statistical methods that are common to other introductory courses. Labs will teach students how spreadsheets and relational databases can be used to manipulate, analyze, and present the results of scientific research. Prerequisites: BIOL 208 and STAT 151.

587

Course Listings B

588

University of Alberta

will be determined by the student’s job performance as evaluated by the employer, by the student’s performance in the completion of an internship practicum report, and by the student’s ability to learn from the experiences of the Internship as demonstrated in an oral presentation. Prerequisite: WKEXP 955 and 956. O BIOL 409 Zoonoses Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course will examine the biology of zoonotic agents and the implication of host-pathogen interactions to disease susceptibility and resistance. Students will apply these basic concepts towards the understanding of issues governing pathogenesis, pathology, epidemiology, control and surveillance of zoonotic diseases. Focus will be placed on zoonotic agents currently having a significant impact on animal and public health. Lectures will be followed by active discussion of selected readings. Prerequisites: one of IMIN 200, ZOOL 352, ZOOL 354, ENT 392 or consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 409 and BIOL 509. O BIOL 421 Molecular Evolution and Systematics Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Methods for inferring evolutionary trees and their applications to the fields of comparative biology, molecular evolution, and systematics. Topics to be covered include phylogenetic inference, molecular evolution integrated at the organismal and population level, and evolutionary developmental genetics. Labs emphasize practical experience in data analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 335 or consent of instructor. BIOL 380 or 392 recommended. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 421 and BIOL 521. Offered in alternate years. O BIOL 430 Experimental Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Emphasis is on the design of experiments and analysis of data collected from field and laboratory studies in Biology. Prerequisites: STAT 141 or 151 and a 300-level Biological Sciences course. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 430 and REN R 480.

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influence ecological processes. Topics highlighted in this course include landscape components, morphology and dynamics; detecting spatial/temporal change in landscapes; issues of scales; movements of organisms, disturbances, and nutrients across landscape mosaics; and restoration, planning and management in a landscape context. Labs emphasize GIS applications to characterizing landscape patterns and heterogeneity in space and time, distributing and moving organisms across landscapes, and restoring or planning landscapes for conservation objectives. Prerequisites: MATH 115 or SCI 100; STAT 151; one of BIOL 331, 332 or BOT 332. Previous GIS course is useful. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 471 and 571. O BIOL 490 Individual Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Registration will be contingent on the student’s having made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise the program. Credit may be obtained more than once. Prerequisites: A 300-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. O BIOL 495 Special Topics in Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Covers specialized topics of current interest to advanced undergraduates in Biological Sciences. Consult the Department for details about current offerings. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. O BIOL 498 Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Successful completion of this course requires a written report on the research project. Credit may be obtained more than once. Prerequisites: A 300-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies.

BIOL 432 Field Methods in Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-0-6). Design, execution, analysis, and presentation of problems in behavioral, population, and community ecology in a field environment. Field exercises, demonstration of techniques, and data collection for independent projects will take place during the two weeks preceding the Fall term at a field station off the main campus. Final reports are due in the last week of September. Prerequisites: BIOL 331 or 332 or ZOOL 371 or BOT 332; a statistics course such as STAT 151, BIOL 330 or 430. This course requires payment of additional miscellaneous fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

O BIOL 499 Research Project Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-0-6). Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Successful completion of this course requires an oral presentation and a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 300-level Biological Sciences course and the consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Note: Students in Honors in Biological Sciences are required to successfully complete BIOL 499.

O BIOL 433 Plant-Animal Interactions Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Plants and animals have a long co-evolutionary history, and this course explores many of the ways in which plants and animals use and abuse each other. Specific topics include pollination biology, herbivory, and dispersal. Emphasis is on both the evolutionary ecology and ecological implications of these interactions. Prerequisite: BIOL 331 or 332 or BOT 332 or ZOOL 371. Offered in alternate years.

Notes (1) All 300- and 400-level courses in the Department of Biological Sciences may be taken for credit (except for BIOL 490, 498 and 499) by graduate students with approval of the student’s supervisory committee. (2) The following courses may be taken as an option in graduate programs in the Department of Biological Sciences with approval of the student’s supervisor or supervisory committee: BIOCH 510, 520, 530, 541, 550, 555, 560; CHEM 361, 363, 461; CELL 300, 301; REN R 511; IMIN 371, 372, 452, 501; MA SC 400, 401, 402, 410, 412, 420, 425, 430, 437, 440, 445, 470, 480; MMI 405, 415; NEURO 472; NU FS 363; PALEO 418, 419; PHARM 601.

O BIOL 434 Chemical Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). An introduction to the broad field of Chemical Ecology through survey, discussion and analysis of current and historical literature. Topics include a wide array of chemically-mediated ecological interactions in a variety of taxa. Studies that analyze the importance of the use of chemical signals for habitat selection, resource acquisition, reproduction, defense and social interactions are discussed. Students research topics in Chemical Ecology and present their findings in oral and written formats. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. CHEM 164 or 261 recommended. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 434 and 534. Offered in alternate years. O BIOL 440 Watershed Ecohydrology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). The course will introduce students to theory and techniques employed in the analysis of physical, hydrological, chemical, and ecological properties of ecosystems using a watershed (catchment) approach. Focus will be on landscape interactions or linkages between upland, wetland/ riparian, and surface-water in the study of the natural ecohydrologic function and response to disturbance of watershed ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on Boreal Alberta. Topics are covered through reading the literature and group discussions. Prerequisite: BIOL 333 or 340 or 364 or EAS 223 or REN R 350, or consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 440 and 540. O BIOL 445 Current Topics in Animal and Cell Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Survey, discussion and evaluation of literature dealing with current advances and selected topics in animal and cell physiology. Prerequisite: ZOOL 340 or 342 or 343, or PHYSL 372. Credit may be obtained more than once. Offered in alternate years. O BIOL 468 Problems in Conservation Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Seminar and reading course dealing with current problems in conservation biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 367 or ZOOL 465 or REN R 364 and consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 468 and ZOOL 468. O BIOL 471 Landscape Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Landscapes are holistic entities whose patterns

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Graduate Courses

BIOL 501 Applied Bioinformatics Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-0). Discussion of computational tools and databases used in the analysis of data from high-throughput molecular biology studies. Students will use existing tools, learn the underlying algorithms and their limitations, and will be required to complete an individual research project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOIN 301 and BIOL 501. BIOL 506 Systematics and Evolution Forum Œ2 (fi 4) (either term, 1-1s-0). Lectures and discussions on a variety of subjects in systematics and evolutionary biology by graduate students, staff, and visiting speakers. Credit may be obtained more than once. Prerequisite: consent of instructors for students not registered in the systematics and evolution graduate program. BIOL 509 Advanced Topics in Zoonoses Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course will examine the biology of zoonotic agents and the implication of host-pathogen interactions to disease susceptibility and resistance. Students will apply these basic concepts towards the understanding of issues governing pathogenesis, pathology, epidemiology, control and surveillance of zoonotic diseases. Focus will be placed on zoonotic agents currently having a significant impact on animal and public health. Lectures will be followed by active discussion of selected readings. Scheduled classes are the same as for BIOL 409, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 409 and BIOL 509. BIOL 521 Advanced Molecular Evolution and Systematics Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Methods for inferring evolutionary trees and their applications to the fields of comparative biology, molecular evolution, and systematics. Topics to be covered include phylogenetic inference, molecular evolution integrated at the organismal and population level, and evolutionary developmental genetics. Labs emphasize practical experience in data analysis. Lectures and

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BIOL 534 Advanced Chemical Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). An introduction to the broad field of Chemical Ecology through survey, discussion and analysis of current and historical literature. Topics include a wide array of chemically-mediated ecological interactions in a variety of taxa. Studies that analyze the importance of the use of chemical signals for habitat selection, resource acquisition, reproduction, defense and social interactions are discussed. Students research topics in Chemical Ecology and present their findings in oral and written formats. Graduate students complete an additional assignment and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 434 and 534. Offered in alternate years. BIOL 540 Advanced Watershed Ecohydrology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). The course will introduce students to theory and techniques employed in the analysis of physical, hydrological, chemical, and ecological properties of ecosystems using a watershed (catchment) approach. Focus will be on landscape approaches relating interactions or linkages between upland, wetland/riparian, and surface-water in the study of the natural ecohydrologic function and response to disturbance of watershed ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on Boreal Alberta. Topics are covered through reading the literature and group discussions. Seminars are the same as for BIOL 440, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 440 and 540. BIOL 545 Advanced Topics in Animal and Cell Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Survey, discussion and evaluation of literature dealing with current advances and selected topics in animal and cell physiology. Credit may be obtained more than once. Discussions are the same as for BIOL 445, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Enrolment of students by consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. BIOL 560 Current Problems in Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Seminar and reading on current problems concerning selected aspects of ecology. More than one section may be available and topics change from year to year. Please consult the Department for current information. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. Prerequisite: at least one 400-level ecology course. BIOL 570 Models in Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-1). Formulation, analysis, parameterization, and validation of quantitative models for ecological processes. Applications include population dynamics, species interactions, movement, and spatial processes. Approaches include classical hypothesis testing, computer simulation, differential equations, individual-based models, least squares, likelihood, matrix equations, Markov processes, multiple working hypotheses, and stochastic processes. The lab covers computer simulation methods. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Offered in alternate years. BIOL 571 Landscape Ecology and Applications Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Landscapes are holistic entities whose patterns influence ecological processes. Topics highlighted in this course include landscape components, morphology and dynamics; detecting spatial/temporal change in landscapes; issues of scales; movements of organisms, disturbances, and nutrients across landscape mosaics; and restoration, planning and management in a landscape context. Labs emphasize GIS applications to characterizing landscape patterns and heterogeneity in space and time, distributing and moving organisms across landscapes, and restoring or planning landscapes for conservation objectives. Lectures and labs are the same as for BIOL 471, but with an additional research project and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 471 and 571. BIOL 592 Laboratory Techniques in Molecular Ecology and Systematics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-1s-6). A laboratory course introducing students to current molecular biology techniques and associated analyses used to study population genetics, systematics, and evolutionary biology in natural populations. Students will develop microsatellite marker systems and use them to examine the genetic structure of a natural population. A comparative bioinformatic approach will be used to generate sequence data to investigate the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate gene analysis and in phylogenetic inference. Labs are the same as BIOL 392, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, corequisite: BIOL 380. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 392 and 592. BIOL 595 Special Topics in Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Covers specialized topics of current interest to graduate students in Biological Sciences. Consult the Department for details about current offerings. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. BIOL 601 Philosophy, Sociology, and Politics of Science Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Influences of current philosophical concepts, and the

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sociological and political realities, on biological research and teaching. Offered in alternate years. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. BIOL 603 Advanced Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Designed for new graduate students in environmental biology to foster critical thinking and discussion and to introduce them to issues of experimental design and analysis and different approaches to ecology. The course involves student discussion of papers, lectures by faculty members on their research, seminars by students and a written assignment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Preference will be given to students in Biological Sciences. BIOL 631 Seminar in Ecology and Evolution Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-1s-0). Credit may be obtained more than once. BIOL 633 Advanced Techniques in Biology Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-2s-0). This course will cover specialized topics of current interest to graduate students in Biological Sciences with an emphasis on learning new research skills. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. BIOL 642 Seminars in Physiology, Cell and Developmental Biology Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-2s-0). Credit may be obtained more than once.

231.66

Biomedical Engineering, BME Department of Biomedical Engineering Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

Note: See also EE BE 512 and 540 which may be taken as courses in this discipline.

Undergraduate Courses BME 320 Human Anatomy and Physiology: Cells and Tissue Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the fundamental levels of organization of the human body highlighted in engineering terms. The first half of the course will consider the chemical, cellular, and tissue levels of organization. The second half of the course will be devoted to bone, joints, muscle, and neural tissue. Guest lectures will include engineers and medical scientists to discuss the relationship between recent advances in biomedical engineering and the underlying anatomy and physiology. This course is intended for students in the Faculty of Engineering. Students from other faculties must obtain the consent of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Credit may be obtained for only BME 210 or 320. BME 321 Human Anatomy and Physiology: Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the organization of the human body at the level of the anatomical systems highlighted in engineering terms. Lectures will be devoted to the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, nervous and endocrine systems, and fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis. Guest lectures will include engineers and medical scientists to discuss the relationship between recent advances in biomedical engineering and the underlying anatomy and physiology. This course is intended for students in the Faculty of Engineering. Students from other faculties must obtain the consent of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Credit may be obtained for only BME 211 or 321. Prerequisite: BME 320 or consent of Instructor. O BME 410 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering and Biomedical Systems Modelling Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Introduces the broad field of biomedical engineering while focusing on the quantitative methods and modelling in key areas that emphasize the similarities between biomedical and conventional engineering science. Practical numerical models of several body systems will be covered, with an emphasis on development, evaluation and validation of realistic physiological models using computational methods. Intended primarily for undergraduate students of the Engineering program. Students from other faculties must obtain the consent of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Prerequisite BME 320.

Graduate Courses BME 510 Neuroimaging in Neuroscience Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Neuroimaging has developed rapidly in recent years, and has had a profound effect on how we understand the human brain. This advanced course is aimed to provide graduate students and senior undergraduate students a comprehensive overview of the neuroimaging techniques (structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MRI spectroscopy (MRS) etc) currently used in neuroscience research. In addition, we will discuss how neuroimaging methods can advance our understanding of healthy brain function and neuropsychiatric disorders. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. O BME 513 Imaging Methods in Medicine Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Introduction to basic physical and technological aspects of medical imaging. Emphasis on computed transmission and emission tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound imaging. These methods are

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B Course Listings

labs are the same as BIOL 421, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 421 and BIOL 521. Offered in alternate years.

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developed and contrasted in terms of how imaging information is generated, detected, and processed and how different hardware configurations and other factors limit image quality. Relative diagnostic potential of the imaging methods is also discussed in relation to future prospects of each method. BME 520 Neuroplasticity Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An advanced course for graduate students in Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering that covers the cellular and systems level changes in sensorimotor and pain pathways in response to motor training and/or trauma to the nervous system. A background on experimental techniques and mechanisms of neuronal plasticity from key studies in cortical, spinal and dorsal horn systems will be provided. Students are expected to write and present on current topics in the field of motor and pain neuroplasticity. Students should have a basic background in neurophysiology. Prerequisites: PMCOL 371 and PHYSL 372 or equivalents or consent of instructor. BME 530 Topics in Biomedical Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Individual sections covering such topics as signal processing and rehabilitation engineering. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. O BME 553 Rehabilitation Engineering: Assisted Movement After Injury Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-0). Introduction to rehabilitation techniques for assisting individuals with physical disabilities to reach, stand and walk. Biomechanics of intact and pathological movements and the use of assistive devices such as exoskeletal orthotics, neuroprosthetic devices and locomotor training are emphasized. Students are exposed to the concepts of biomechanical modeling, motion analysis, electrical stimulation, control systems, neuroregeneration, and pharmacology. Prerequisite: BME 320 and 321 or consent of Instructor. BME 564 Fundamentals of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students requiring a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of imaging by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR. Topics include the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance as applied to imaging, image processing, imaging techniques for achieving specific types of contrast, image artifacts, and typical applications. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. BME 579 Topics in Medical Physics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Individual sections dealing with such topics as computed tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance, therapeutic radiation. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. BME 599 Project in Biomedical Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Practical application of science to problems in health care; involves report on problem and alternative solutions, plus complete demonstration and documentation of chosen solution. Prerequisite: Any BME course and consent of Department. BME 600 Seminars in Biomedical Engineering Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s/2-0). Series of seminars exposing graduate students to the various areas of research and providing a forum for progress reports in individual areas. Seminars by research workers from inside and outside the University are included. Seminars are informal with ample opportunity for discussion. BME 630 Advanced Topics in Biomedical Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department.

231.67

Botanique, BOTQ Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle BOTQ 380 Plantes médicinales Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Survol de l’utilisation historique et courante des plantes qui produisent des médicaments ou des drogues. Évaluation de la chimie et de la physiologie des composés biologiquement actifs (toxiques, analgésiques et hallucinogènes) et l’utilisation courante de ces produits végétaux. Utilisation de la biotechnologie des végétaux pour développer des plantes qui produisent des composés médicamenteux. Préalable(s): Œ3 de niveau 200 en sciences biologiques ou BIOCM 200. BOT 205 est recommandé.

231.68

Botany (Biological Sciences), BOT Department of Biological Sciences Faculty of Science

Notes (1) See the following sections for listings of other Biological Sciences courses: Bioinformatics (BIOIN); Biology (BIOL); Entomology (ENT); Genetics (GENET); Microbiology (MICRB); Zoology (ZOOL). (2) See the following sections for listings of other relevant courses: Interdisciplinary

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Studies (INT D); Immunology and Infection (IMIN); Marine Science (MA SC); Paleontology (PALEO).

Undergraduate Courses O BOT 205 Fundamentals of Plant Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). An overview of the diversity and biology of organisms traditionally included in the Plant Kingdom (algae, fungi, lichens, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and flowering plants). Emphasis throughout the course is on the relationship between structural and functional innovations in plants and how these have influenced their reproduction and evolution in various ecosystems. Symbioses and co-evolutionary relationships between or among different kinds of plants, and with other groups of organisms, are also considered. Prerequisite: BIOL 108 or SCI 100. Credit cannot be obtained for both BOT 205 and PL SC 221. O BOT 303 Plant Development Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). The generation of a functional plant requires the spatially coordinated acquisition of numerous cell identities. Examines developmental processes in plants at the molecular and cellular level and will cover: body axis establishment and tissue pattern formation during embryogenesis, cell-to-cell communication in patterning events and differentiation processes, and cell differentiation patterns in tissue systems. Emphasis throughout the course will be on current research using developmental mutants. Prerequisites: BIOL 201 and 207; one of BOT 205, 210 or 240/340 strongly recommended. O BOT 308 Plant Anatomy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-3). Seed plant structure and development with particular emphasis on flowering plants. The course covers origin, development, and function of meristems (apical, primary, and lateral), tissue and organ development, wood structure and identification, floral anatomy, embryogenesis, and fruit structure. Prerequisites: BIOL 108 or SCI 100. BOT 205 recommended. May not be taken for credit if credit already obtained in BOT 209 or 309. Offered in alternate years. O BOT 314 Biology of Bryophytes Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Bryophytes (hornworts, liverworts and mosses) form a unique group of basal land plants that are pivotal for understanding evolution of life in terrestrial environments. This course covers the evolution, systematics and ecological diversity of bryophytes of the world, using morphological, molecular and developmental data. Prerequisite: BIOL 108 or SCI 100 and a 200-level Biology course (BOT 205 or 210 recommended) or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. O BOT 321 Flowering Plants Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). Modern approaches to the classification and evolution of the flowering plants. The diversity and relationships of the angiosperms are examined from a phylogenetic perspective. Topics include practical and theoretical aspects of species description, nomenclature and phylogeny interpretation, with a focus on the characteristics and significance of the major families of flowering plants in Alberta and from around the world. Prerequisite: BIOL 108 or SCI 100. BOT 205 recommended. May not be taken for credit if credit already obtained in BOT 220 or 320. O BOT 322 Field Botany Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Lectures, laboratory, and field exercises provide an introduction to description and identification of plants and their local habitats. Factors affecting variation in natural vegetation and methods used to describe it are discussed. Field exercises and projects take place during the two weeks preceding the fall term and some may take place off campus. Presentations take place during the first four weeks of class time in September. Prerequisites: BIOL 108 or SCI 100 and any 200-level Biology course. (BOT 321 is strongly recommended). May not be taken for credit if credit already obtained in BOT 304. Offered in alternate years. O BOT 330 Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function of Algae Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). The remarkable biodiversity of algae provides the foundation for most aquatic ecosystems around the world. This course emphasizes the evolution, taxonomy, and ecology of major groups of algae to illustrate relationships between their form and function in pristine and polluted environments. Laboratories will focus on the taxonomic diversity of algae through the use of field surveys of local streams and lakes, and experiments using our extensive algal culture collection. Prerequisite: 200-level Biology course. Both BOT 205 and BIOL 208 recommended. Offered in alternate years. O BOT 332 Plant Ecology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). Study of the local factors, which limit plant growth, reproduction, and diversity. Particular emphasis on the mechanisms by which plants interact with their local environment and the effects of these interactions on diversity and community functioning. Specific topics include plant foraging, germination ecology, mechanisms of competition and facilitation, patterns of diversity, and community stability. Prerequisites: BIOL 208 and STAT 151. BOT 205 recommended. O BOT 340 Plant Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). This course explores how plants function. Topics include water transport and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, photosynthesis

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O BOT 380 Drug Plants Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Survey of historical and current use of important drug-producing plants. Evaluation of the chemistry and physiology of biologically active compounds from poisonous, analgesic, and hallucinogenic plants, and the current uses of such plant products. Use of plant biotechnology to develop drugproducing plants. Prerequisite: a 200-level Biological Sciences course or BIOCH 200. BOT 205 recommended. O BOT 382 Plant Biotechnology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Using examples from current research, techniques used in modern plant biotechnology and the way this technology is being used to modify and improve economically important plants and their use as biofactories will be discussed. Specific topics will include; gene isolation, plant transformation, plant tissue culture, clonal plant propagation, and somatic embryogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOL 107 or SCI 100 and a 200-level Biological Sciences course. BOT 205 recommended. Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both BOT 382 and PL SC 491. Offered in alternate years. O BOT 445 Molecular Plant Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Plant responses to their environment are underpinned by myriad molecular events. This course examines the molecular and cellular biology of plant responses to environmental cues, with an emphasis on signalling and regulation of gene expression mediating physiological responses. Topics such as plant cell walls, phytohormone action, photoreceptors, and programmed cell death will be covered. Prerequisite: BOT 382 or GENET 364 or consent of the instructor. BOT 240 or 340 recommended. Credit cannot be obtained for both BOT 445 and BOT 545. Offered in alternate years. O BOT 464 Plant Functional Genomics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Through a combination of lectures, discussions, and computer-based exercises, skills are taught for the analysis of large-scale molecular data sets (e.g. genomic, transcriptomic, or proteomic data). These analytical skills are applied to recently published studies to derive biologically relevant information about the physiology and development of plants. Prerequisite: GENET 364 or consent of the instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BOT 464 and 564. Offered in alternate years.

Graduate Courses Notes (1) All 300- and 400-level courses in the Department of Biological Sciences may be taken for credit (except for BIOL 490, 498 and 499) by graduate students with approval of the student’s supervisor or supervisory committee. (2) The following courses may be taken as an option in graduate programs in the Department of Biological Sciences with approval of the student’s supervisor or supervisory committee. BIOCH 510, 520, 530, 541, 550, 555, 560; CHEM 361, 363, 461; CELL 300, 301; REN R 511; IMIN 371, 372, 452, 501; MA SC 400, 401, 402, 410, 412, 420, 425, 430, 437, 440, 445, 470, 480; MMI 405, 415, 520; NEURO 472; NU FS 363; PALEO 418, 419; PHARM 601. BOT 545 Advanced Molecular Plant Physiology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Plant responses to their environment are underpinned by myriad molecular events. This course examines the molecular and cellular biology of plant responses to environmental cues, with an emphasis on signalling and regulation of gene expression mediating physiological responses. Topics such as plant cell walls, phytohormone action, photoreceptors, and programmed cell death will be covered. Lectures are the same as for BOT 445, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BOT 445 and 545. Offered in alternate years. BOT 564 Advanced Plant Functional Genomics Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Through a combination of lectures, discussions, and computer-based exercises, skills are taught for the analysis of large-scale molecular data sets (e.g. genomic, transcriptomic, or proteomic data). These analytical skills are applied to recently published studies to derive biologically relevant information about the physiology and development of plants. Scheduled classes are the same as for BOT 464, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BOT 464 and 564. Offered in alternate years. BOT 600 Seminar in Plant Biology Œ1 (fi 2) (either term, 0-2s-0). Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

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Business, BUS Department of Strategic Management and Organization Faculty of Business

Note: Enrolment in all BUS courses is restricted to students registered in the Faculty of Business, or to students registered in specified programs that require Business courses to meet degree requirements and who have obtained prior approval of their Faculty.

Undergraduate Courses BUS 201 Introduction to Canadian Business Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 2-0-1.5). Provides students with an introduction to the Faculty and the functional areas of business. Students improve computer, presentation, leadership and group skills. Areas covered include introductions to statistics and research and selected areas from accounting, finance, information systems, marketing, operations, strategic management and others. Open only to students in the Faculty of Business. BUS 301 Business Communications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This is a practical skill development course open to students of all majors in any year of a Business program. Good communication in business matters. This course will help develop writing confidence and strategies for professional business applications. The focus is on hands-on guided practice and uses business scenarios to emphasize technical and persuasive writing as well as an understanding of the skills required to begin a successful business career. In addition students will develop a strong resume, cover letter and a personal brand. BUS 435 Information, Ethics and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). For students in all majors who are interested in information and the roles it plays in business and society. Focus is on the nature and basic characteristics of information, and its importance in contemporary society, viewing information as a commodity that is produced, used, bought and sold. Two aspects of the ways in which information affects people are emphasized: (1) ethical issues relating to professions, businesses, government, and individuals; (2) the impact of information technology and technological change on society. Prerequisites: Open only to third or fourth year Business students, or by consent of the Department Chair. Credit may be granted for only one of ACCTG 435, BUS 435 or MIS 435. BUS 465 Internship Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Practical application of business skills and theory to a problem or issues addressed during a period of 13 - 16 weeks of placement in a work environment within Canada. The internship includes preliminary instruction and requires, under the supervision of the Faculty, an approved preliminary proposal and the presentation of a project report to the sponsoring organization. Prerequisites: Consent of the Business Undergraduate Office. BUS 466 International Internship Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Practical application of business skills and theory to a problem or issues addressed during a period of 13 - 16 weeks of placement in a work environment outside of Canada. The internship includes preliminary instruction and requires, under the supervision of the Faculty, an approved preliminary proposal and the presentation of a project report to the sponsoring organization. Prerequisites: Consent of the Business Undergraduate Office. BUS 480 Special Projects Course Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course applies the techniques developed in several Business courses to a group project or a business case analysis. The emphasis in the projects is on integrated approaches to business problems. Student groups will work on consulting projects from businesses and other organizations in and near Edmonton. Groups will work on their projects under the supervision of the instructor(s). An approved preliminary proposal is required. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor and the Undergraduate Office. Open only to fourth year students. BUS 488 Selected Topics in Business Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Normally restricted to third and fourth year Business students. Prerequisite: consent of Faculty of Business. Additional prerequisites may be required. BUS 490 Business Competition Part I Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 0-1.5s-0). Preparation for Student Competition in Business. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. BUS 491 Business Competition Part II Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 0-1.5s-0). Completion of Student Competition in Business. Prerequisite: BUS 490 and consent of Instructor.

Graduate Courses BUS 501 Business Skills Orientation Œ0 (fi 1) (either term, variable). Orientation to the MBA program, including primers

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B Course Listings

and carbon resource utilization, nitrogen nutrition and symbioses, photosensing, and responses to environmental stresses such as attack by pests and pathogens. Laboratories introduce both classical and contemporary methods in plant physiology. Prerequisites: BIOL 107; CHEM 101 or 164 or 261; and a 200-level Biological Sciences course or PL SC 221. Credit cannot be obtained for both BOT 240 and 340. SCI 100 may be used in lieu of BIOL 107 and CHEM 101.

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University of Alberta

on team building, ethics and academic integrity, time/life management, public speaking, library resources, career planning and business etiquette. BUS 504 Career Management Skills Œ0 (fi 1) (variable, variable). Fundamentals of career success are covered, including letter writing, interviewing, career planning, company analysis, industry analysis and wealth building/management. BUS 505 Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility with Communications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course focuses on the application of moral principles and models for ethical decision making to individuals and businesses in the 21st century. Contemporary ethical and social issues will be examined through the use of case studies, class discussions and presentations. Topics include concepts of individual ethics, workplace issues, corporate compliance and social and environmental responsibility. While examining ethical issues, emphasis will be placed on improving students’ proficiency levels in verbal and written business communication. BUS 586 Selected Topics in Business Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics in this seminar may vary from year to year and are chosen at the discretion of the Instructor. BUS 601 Business Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (two term, 3-0-0). Students are divided into groups and the groups are assigned a project in either a business or government organization. At the end of the course each group is required to write a report and to make a presentation derived from the project to the other groups in the course. Prerequisite: All required Year 1 MBA core courses. BUS 640 Strategic Supply Chain Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Supply Chain Management and how it relates to a firm’s competitiveness. Emphasis will be placed on the role of SCM in transforming global business practices and relations. SCM informs how a firm would source, design, produce, and market its products in today’s global environment. Topics will include global business trends, current supply chain practices, international procurement, logistics and inventory management, performance assessment, supply management and SCM strategy in a global environment. Prerequisite: BUEC 503. BUS 648 MBA International Study Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Combines lectures at the University of Alberta with an onsite study tour to a foreign country. The study tour component is normally for a one-to-two week period, during which students participate in company tours and lectures, to develop an appreciation for different business cultures and contexts. Students are usually expected to complete projects or case studies relating to the country under study. Check with MBA office for enrolment restrictions. Credit will not be given for both BUS 648 and any other study tour to the same destination. Students may receive credit for only two of the following three courses: BUS 648, BUEC 648, SMO 648. BUS 686 Selected Topics in Business Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics in this course may vary from year to year and are chosen at the discretion of the Instructor. BUS 701 Qualitative Methodology for Business Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines qualitative research methods as they apply to business research. Includes: the terrain and history of qualitative research, exploring different approaches to qualitative research, designing qualitative research, strategies of inquiry, qualitative data analysis, writing up research, and professional and ethical issues. Prerequisite: Registration in Business PhD Program or written permission of instructor. Approval of the Business PhD Program Director is also required for non-PhD students. BUS 715 Experimental Design for Behavioural Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course teaches the principles of experimental design for the study of human behaviour. Experiments may be administered through surveys and on the Internet as well as in laboratory settings. Behavioural texts on experimental design rely heavily on weak between-subjects designs, whereas statistics texts favour engineering applications that are inherently simpler than the study of human behaviour. After explaining the principles of randomization and of efficient design, the course concludes by illustrating how more powerful designs can characterize human learning without confounding it with subjects’ naive responses. Prerequisites: Registration in the Business PhD Program or permission of instructor. Approval of the Associate Dean for the Business PhD Program also required for non-PhD students. BUS 801 Introduction to Financial Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course will introduce the perspective, required knowledge, skills, and context for the position of Chief Financial Officer. Ethical aspects of business situations and relationships will also be addressed. BUS 804 Contracting and Negotiating Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course is a blend of both experiential learning and theory with the objective of making the student more effective in all types of bargaining. A study of positive theories on how to improve negotiation skills will

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be combined with analytical models of the game theoretic structure of bargaining. Through this mix of theories and several case studies and bargaining exercises, students will see both the opportunities for joint gain (win-win) and the constraints which can lead to inferior outcomes. BUS 820 Corporate Governance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Good governance is essential to well functioning capital markets that provide entrepreneurs and corporations with access to capital. Corporate governance deals with the practices and institutions that give credence to the promises of cash flows embedded in the securities issued by firms. This course is built around three inter-related modules. First, we consider what is meant by governance, examining stakeholder theory, comparing international governance regimes, and considering incentives and ethics. Second, we examine internal governance mechanisms and discuss boards of directors, compensation schemes, and organizational structure. Third, we consider governance mechanisms outside the firm including ownership structure, market forces, and regulatory oversight. BUS 855 International Study Tour Œ1.5 (fi 16) (second term, 18 hours). A week-long intensive course. Understanding the challenges facing local companies in their environment, for example, Asia or Eastern Europe. An on-site visit to the location is included. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. BUS 860 Special Topics Œ3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics will vary from year to year. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. BUS 875 Special Topics Œ3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics will vary from year to year. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. BUS 880 Business Project Œ6 (fi 64) (two term, 3-0-0). Students are required to complete a custom designed project for a client company and prepare a business plan. The company selected could be the student’s own organization or a unit within the organization. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. BUS 900 Directed Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned).

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Business Economics, BUEC Departments of Marketing, Business Economics, and Law Faculty of Business

Note: Enrolment in all BUS courses is restricted to students registered in the Faculty of Business, or to students registered in specified programs that require Business courses to meet degree requirements and who have obtained prior approval of their Faculty.

Undergraduate Courses BUEC 311 Business Economics, Organizations and Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Business organizations as systems of mutually reinforcing functional areas where decision making is driven by underlying economic forces. Application of economic theory to facilitate complex decision making within organizations: economic models of decision making are linked directly to functional areas of management. Topics include the organization of firms and industries; meeting customer needs; and decision making involving production, resource use, dealing with risk and uncertainty, scale and scope of operations, competitive advantage, and product pricing. Prerequisites: ECON 101, 102, and MATH 113 or equivalent. Students may receive credit for only one of BUEC 301, BUEC 311, MANEC 301 or ECON 383. Not open to students with previous credit in ECON 281. BUEC 342 Introduction to International Business Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Provides students with an introduction to the tools they will require to succeed in the increasingly international business world. Serves as a basis for other more advanced courses in International Business. Topics covered could include Country Differences, International Trade, Foreign Direct Investment, Regional Economic Integration, The Foreign Exchange Market and International Business Strategy and Operations. Students may receive credit for only one of BUEC 342, 444 or ADMI 444. BUEC 442 The Global Business Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines the changing global business environment and how it impacts international business decision-making. Topics covered could include Trends in Globalization, International Business in Canada, Managing Multinational Corporations, Importing and Exporting, International Labor Markets and the Market for Skills, International Financial Markets, Financial Crises, and Corporate Governance in Different Countries. Prerequisite: BUEC 342 or consent of Instructor. Students may receive credit for only one of BUEC 442, 445 or ADMI 445.

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BUEC 454 Principles of Real Estate Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the principles of commercial real estate. Real estate markets and decision making; real estate economics and location; property development; marketing and property management; mortgage lending, real estate investment, brokerage and regulation. Industry guest speakers help link theory with industry practice in their areas of expertise. Prerequisite: BUEC 311 or ECON 281. BUEC 463 Energy and the Environment: Industry Structure, Performance and Challenges Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Uses the basic tools of business economics in order to gain a better understanding of energy markets and industries. Differences and similarities between specific industries (oil, gas, electricity, etc.) and between different industry segments (exploration, production, retail, etc.) are highlighted. New challenges faced by the industry, most notably environmental concerns, but also globalization and new forms of competition, are analysed with respect to the impacts that they have had and might have in the future on firms’ strategies and on market performance. Prerequisite: BUEC 311 or ECON 281. BUEC 464 Environmental Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the theory and application of environmental economics and its role in management and policy-making. The course will cover development of a model of pollution control, evaluation of policy in this context, the setting of optimal environmental policies, and the application of these policies. Particular policies and practices implemented in North America will be examined. Prerequisite: BUEC 311 or ECON 281. BUEC 479 Government and Business in Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The role of business in the public policy process: how business organizations influence public policy and its administration, and how public policies affect business. Processes of change are of particular interest. Attention is to the motivation, behavior patterns, and the dynamics of the interaction of different stakeholder groups, policy makers, and managers responsible for the implementation of public policies. Develops a framework for analysis of the effectiveness and efficiency of different fiscal, regulatory, and promotional policies; consideration is given to the impact of technological, economic, and social change on policy choice in the long term. Prerequisite: BUEC 311 or ECON 281. BUEC 488 Selected Topics in Business Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Normally restricted to third- and fourth-year Business students. Prerequisites: BUEC 311 or ECON 281, or consent of Department. Additional prerequisites may be required. BUEC 495 Individual Research Project I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: consent of Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program. BUEC 496 Individual Research Project II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special Study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: BUEC 495, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program. BUEC 497 Individual Research Project III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special Study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: BUEC 496, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program.

Graduate Courses BUEC 503 Economic Foundations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course focuses on economic decision making at the level of the firm and consumer, utilizing demand and supply analysis to help understand a variety of economic and managerial issues. Formal models of managerial economic problems will be developed and used for purposes of analysis. The course will also deal with public economics, regulatory economics and introduce issues of information economics and strategic behavior. The theory of public choice and public goods will be used to analyze a variety of public economic issues. The course will also cover macroeconomic issues including: measuring macroeconomic variables, sources of economic growth, business cycles, interest rates, exchange rates, government debt, and other topics. Credit will not be given for both BUEC 502 and 503.

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BUEC 510 Macroeconomics, Public Economics and Public Policy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). In this course the fundamentals of macroeconomics, macroeconomic policy, public economics and the relationship to public policy will be explored. Interest rates, inflation, aggregate demand and aggregate supply will be explored, and students will understand the fundamentals of macroeconomics and macroeconomic policy. The relationship between public economics, regulation and public policy will also be developed. This course will provide a deeper understanding of economics beyond the fundamentals course. Prerequisite: BUEC 503. This course is intended for MBA students. BUEC 542 International Business Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Provides students with an introduction to the tools they will require to succeed in the increasingly international business world. Serves as a basis for other more advanced courses in International Business, covering such topics as Country Differences, International Trade, Foreign Direct Investment, Regional Economic Integration, The Foreign Exchange Market and International Business Strategy and Operations. This course will also cover selective topics in international macro economics. Prerequisite: BUEC 502 or 503. Not open to students who have taken BUEC 541. BUEC 563 Energy Industries and Markets Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course provides a broad introduction to the energy industries and markets, focusing on market structure, firm strategy and behavior, regulation and public policy. The evolving nature of industries and markets, including technological challenges, environmental constraints and globalization, are discussed. The course includes a number of site visits and guest speakers. Prerequisite: BUEC 502 or 503. Not open to students with credit in BUEC 560. BUEC 564 Environmental Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The economic theory of externalities is introduced and applied in a discussion of alternative policy instruments such as taxes, tradable permits, and regulatory standards which are used to deal with pollution. Topics include current environmental regulation issues such as climate change, water and air pollution and firm strategy. Extensions include an introduction to cost-benefit analysis and environmental impact assessment tools for project evaluation as well as a discussion of the economics of non-renewable resources. Prerequisite: BUEC 502 or 503. Not open to students with credit in BUEC 562. BUEC 610 Principles of Real Estate Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the principles of commercial real estate. Real estate markets and decision making; real estate economics and location; property development; marketing and property management; mortgage lending, real estate investment, brokerage and regulation. Industry guest speakers help link theory with industry practice in their areas of expertise. Prerequisites: BUEC 503. BUEC 646 The Global Business Environment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines the changing global business environment and how it impacts international business decision-making. Covers such topics as Trends in Globalization, International Business in Canada, Managing Multinational Corporations, Importing and Exporting, International Labor Markets and the Market for Skills, International Financial Markets, Financial Crises, and Corporate Governance in Different Countries. Prerequisite: BUEC 541 or 542. BUEC 648 International Study Tour Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Combines lectures at the University of Alberta with an on-site study tour to a foreign country. The study tour component is normally for a one-to-two week period, during which students participate in company tours and lectures, to develop an appreciation for different business cultures and contexts. Students are usually expected to complete projects or case studies relating to the country under study. Check with MBA office for enrolment restrictions. Credit will not be given for both BUEC 648 and any other MBA study tour to the same destination. Students may receive credit for only two of the following three courses: BUS 648, BUEC 648, SMO 648. BUEC 663 Natural Resources and Energy Capstone Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A project-focused course dealing with international market, business and policy issues and challenges in the energy, environment and natural resources sectors. A course designed around an international trip with a focus on knowledge integration and application to international markets through an intense set of visits with firms, organizations and government agencies. The specific content including the location of the trip and issues addressed changes from year to year. The course involves both teamwork and individual research. In exceptional circumstances students can complete an additional project if they are unable to complete the travel component of the course. The course is open only to students registered in the NREE specialization in the final year of the MBA program. Prerequisites: Completion of all core and NREE required courses, or permission from the program office. BUEC 678 Managing Business-Government Relations in Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The role of business in the public policy process: How business organizations influence public policy and its administration, and how public policies affect business. Processes of change are of particular interest. Attention is placed on the motivation, behavior patterns, and the dynamics of the interaction of different stakeholder groups, policy makers, and managers responsible

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B Course Listings

BUEC 444 International Study Tours Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course is a combination of on site study tours to a foreign country and academic coursework. The study tour component will normally be for a two to three week period, during which students will participate in company tours, lectures and language and cultural study to develop an appreciation for different business cultures and contexts. Upon return, students will be expected to complete a group project or case study relating to the business environment of the country under study. Prerequisites: Preference will be given to students who have completed at least one other international business course in the Faculty of Business.

593

University of Alberta

Course Listings B

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for the implementation of public policies. Develops a framework for analysis of the effectiveness and efficiency of different fiscal, regulatory, and promotional policies; consideration is given to the impact of technological, economic, and social change on policy choice in the long run. Prerequisites: BUEC 502 or 503. BUEC 686 Selected Topics in Business Economics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics in this seminar may vary from year to year and are chosen at the discretion of the Instructor. BUEC 820 Business Economics Œ3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0). Outlining the main schools of economic theory, macroeconomic tools and the effects of macroeconomic policy on business performance; reviewing decision-making processes of individual firms, as well as consumer behavior, price theory, marginal analysis, and forms of competition. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. BUEC 850 Business/Government Interface Œ1.5 (fi 16) (first term, 18 hours). A week-long intensive course. Understanding trends affecting business decision making; the regulatory environment; business/ government interfaces; and the management of public affairs. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. BUEC 860 International Business Œ3 (fi 32) (either term, 3-0-0). Understanding the globalization of business, international trade and trading blocks; planning for market entry and development; exporting, joint ventures, direct investment; developing the skills of an international manager. Restricted to Executive MBA students only. BUEC 870 Strategic Supply Chain Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Supply chain management (SCM) is concerned with the efficient coordination and management of all processes involved in the transformation of inputs into final products in a way that maximizes business efficiency and consumer satisfaction. A cornerstone for competitiveness in today’s business world, the course reviews the fundamental strategies of SCM and how they can be applied to improve competitiveness, performance and profitability. The course emphasizes how to apply SCM principles to improve business practices, enhance cost structures, transform business relations, and .maximize consumer satisfaction. Topics include global trends in SCM, supply chain mapping, strategic procurement, logistics and inventory management for cost control, activity based cost, cycle time reduction, benchmarking and performance measures, the balanced scorecard, international outsourcing, and e-business strategies.

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strategies for dealing with environmental issues is analyzed. Prerequisite: B LAW 301 or ENGG 420. B LAW 432 The Legal Regulation of Business Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of the principles of law that underlie the administrative regulation of business by governmental agencies. A representative agency from each of the three levels of government will be analysed to determine how it is created, what powers it possesses, how it uses its powers and how its powers are constrained. Prerequisite: B LAW 301 or ENGG 420. B LAW 442 International Business Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the law regulating the conduct of international business transactions. This includes trade law (GATT, commodity agreements, economic integration, national rules); finance law (IMF, OECD, ICSID, multinationals, promotion and financing of world trade); and commercial law (payment mechanisms, international commercial contracts, UN Convention on the International Sale of Goods, settlement procedures, pertinent national and international laws). Prerequisite: Open to third-year and fourth-year students. B LAW 444 International Business Transactions Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An overview of current international business patterns and the laws surrounding such patterns, with an emphasis on what makes them different from domestic ones. A major force underlying the internationalization of the world economy has been the rapid, sustained growth of international business, both in the traditional form of international trade and in the newer forms of multinational, global and transnational business. This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the major rules governing cross-border commercial transaction in the contexts of both substantive and procedural law. B LAW 495 Individual Research Project I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: consent of Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program. B LAW 496 Individual Research Project II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special Study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: B LAW 495, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program.

Business Law, B LAW

B LAW 497 Individual Research Project III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Special Study for advanced undergraduates. Prerequisites: B LAW 496, consent of the Instructor and Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Program.

Departments of Marketing, Business Economics, and Law Faculty of Business

Graduate Courses

Note: Enrolment in all B LAW courses, except B LAW 301, is restricted to students registered in the Faculty of Business, or to students registered in specified programs that require Business courses to meet degree requirements and who have obtained prior approval of their Faculty.

B LAW 602 Business Contracts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to, and an overview of, the major areas of law generally encountered in business and commercial law, in particular contract law. Not open to students in the MBA/JD Combined Degree Program.

Undergraduate Courses

B LAW 628 Natural Resource and Environmental Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The course considers the legal framework in which managerial decisions affecting the environment are taken. It looks at the substances of environmental law and the procedures for enforcing it. The interaction of this legal approach with business strategies for dealing with environmental issues is analyzed.

B LAW 301 Legal Foundations of the Canadian Economy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Synoptic view of Canadian legal system, with emphasis on underlying considerations of social policy. While considering the nature, sources, philosophy, and policy objectives of the law, selected topics from the fields of tort and contract will be analyzed. Credit will be granted for only one of B LAW 301 and ENGG 420. B LAW 402 Business Contracts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the special types of contracts that are encountered in business and commercial life. Topics include contract of sale, agency, negotiable instruments, insurance, bailment, employment contracts and contracts involving land as well as societal regulation of the freedom of contract. Prerequisite: B LAW 301 or ENGG 420. B LAW 403 Commercial Transactions Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Integrated analysis of the legal principles applying to commercial transactions, including an examination of the statutes and case law governing the sale of goods, conditional sale and chattel mortgages. Prerequisite: B LAW 301 or ENGG 420. B LAW 422 Law of Business Organizations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the role of the corporation in the business and commercial life of Canada and Alberta, with emphasis on the small private company. Topics include characteristics of corporate existence, process of incorporation, forming a private company, relationship with third parties, distinction between management and ownership, duties of directors and officers, and shareholder rights. Prerequisite: B LAW 301 or ENGG 420. B LAW 428 Natural Resource and Environmental Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The legal framework in which managerial decisions affecting the environment are taken. Substance of environmental law and the procedures for enforcing it. Interaction of this legal approach with business

The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. 

B LAW 642 International Business Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Deals with the international law that provides the regulatory and transactional context in which international commerce takes place. A major force underlying the internationalization of the world economy has been the rapid, sustained growth of international business, both in the traditional form of international trade and in the newer forms of multinational, global and transnational business. Provides an overview of the international economic order, including the law of the World Trade Organization, and examines the rules with respect to contractual obligations, tariffs, quantitative restrictions, subsidies, discrimination, dispute settlement, government procurement and other matters that concern international trade in both goods and services. The international regulation of direct investment, financial flows and multinationals may also be addressed. B LAW 658 Intellectual Property Law and Technology Commercialization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An overview of key legal concepts from a variety of jurisdictions related to intellectual property and its commercialization. The course will follow a comparative case-based approach to explore formal laws, institutions and business practices related to IP in technological innovation. Topics covered may include copyright, trademark, industrial design, database protection, patent law, application process and patent searching, and licensing strategies, with a special focus on the life sciences. The course aims to provide students with the skills required to address legal issues arising from technological innovation. B LAW 686 Selected Topics in Business Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Topics may vary from year to year and are chosen at the discretion of the instructor.

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University of Alberta

www.ualberta.ca

Canadien-français, CA FR Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle O CA FR 350 Panorama de la littérature canadienne-française Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Littérature canadienne-française, des origines à nos jours, vue à travers un choix d’oeuvres dominantes marquant les diverses périodes de son évolution. Préalable(s): FRANC 235. O CA FR 465 La poésie canadienne-française du XXe siècle Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). L’évolution de la poésie canadiennefrançaise de Saint-Denys Garneau à l’époque contemporaine. Préalable(s): FRANC 235 et Œ3 en littérature de niveau 300, préférablement CA FR 350. O CA FR 466 Le théâtre canadien-français du XXe siècle Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). L’évolution du théâtre canadien-français de Gratien Gélinas à l’époque contemporaine. Préalable(s): FRANC 235 et Œ3 en littérature de niveau 300, préférablement CA FR 350. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour ADRAM 466. O CA FR 470 Le roman canadien-français du XXe siècle Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Le roman canadien-français depuis la génération de 1890 jusqu’à la naissance du nouveau roman, vu à travers les plus grands romanciers de cette période. Préalable(s): FRANC 235 et Œ3 en littérature de niveau 300, préférablement CA FR 350. O CA FR 480 Choix de sujet Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). Préalable(s): FRANC 225, 235 et Œ3 en littérature de niveau 300. O CA FR 485 Ecriture au féminin dans la littérature québécoise ou canadienne d’expression française Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-0). L’étude de textes critiques et littéraires dans le but de cerner le concept d’écriture au féminin. Préalable(s): FRANC 235 et Œ3 en littérature de niveau 300. Recommandé: CA FR 350.

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Cell Biology, CELL Departments of Biological Sciences and Cell Biology Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry; and Science

Undergraduate Courses O CELL 201 Introduction to Molecular Cell Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). An introductory Cell Biology course suitable for students interested in pursuing Cell Biology specialization/honors. This course focuses on the molecular aspects of modern cell biology. Topics covered include the nucleus and gene expression; membrane structure and function; signal transduction; organelle biogenesis; cytoskeleton and cell motility; cell adhesion; the cell cycle; cancer; differentiation and stem cell technology. Reference will be made to key investigations and new technologies that have defined modern cell biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 or SCI 100. Pre or corequisite: CHEM 164 or 261 or SCI 100. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in BIOL 201, in addition, not available to students currently enrolled in BIOL 201. O CELL 300 Advanced Cell Biology I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Senior course studying various topics in modern molecular cell biology emphasizing the design of experiments, the interpretation of their results and the extrapolation of their findings. Examines aspects of eukaryotic cell structure and function. Includes, but not restricted to, areas such as protein targeting and organelle biogenesis, intracellular signaling and cellcell interactions. Makes extensive use of current literature to illustrate important concepts. Prerequisites: BIOL 201 or CELL 201 and BIOCH 200. O CELL 301 Advanced Cell Biology II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A continuation of CELL 300, covering Cell Biology topics in greater depth, and exploring recent developments in the field. Intended for, but not restricted to, students in the Cell Biology Honors and Specialization programs. Recommended prerequisite: CELL 300 or consent of Department. CELL 310 Evolution and Diversity of the Cell Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). This course begins by briefly surveying eukaryotic organismal diversity with an emphasis on unicellular organisms and their biomedical/ ecological impact. The course then examines the variation observed in different cellular systems including the nucleus, endomembrane system, mitochondria and plastids and how they can differ from the well studied models such as yeasts, animals and plants. Each organelle will be explored from morphological, genomic and evolutionary perspectives, making use of current literature when possible. Prerequisite: CELL 201 or BIOL 201. CELL 398 Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-3). Directed research carried out in the laboratory of an assigned member of a department participating in the Cell Biology Program. Credit may be obtained for this course only once. Successful completion

The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. 

requires a written report. Prerequisites: Open only to third year students. Pre or corequisite: Any 300-level Science course (CELL 300 recommended) or consent of the department. Students with a 300-level Biological Sciences or Biochemistry course may be considered at the discretion of the Cell Biology Undergraduate Advisor. Closed to Bear Tracks registration. Go to Department website for project information. This course can also be taken as a six week Spring/Summer session course. www.ualberta.ca/cellbiology CELL 402 The Birth and Death of a Cell Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An advanced course dealing with cell differentiation, intracellular and extracellular signaling processes, the cell cycle, apoptosis and necrosis. Consists of lecture material and small group learning sessions. Topics include stem cell research, cancer therapy and human disorders involving cell death (e.g., Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular disease). Requires reading and discussion of current research articles. Prerequisite: any 300-level Science course or consent of Department. CELL 405 Cell Biology of Disease Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course will provide students with a cell biology perspective of disease processes, with special focus on the two major causes of death in humans: cancer and metabolic syndrome, which comprises diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, the nature and mechanisms of cellular processes altered in some inherited disorders and infectious diseases will also be examined. Emphasis will be placed on current research and cutting edge experimental methodologies used to explore abnormalities in the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs that underlie disease. Experimental highlights leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease and disease therapy will be given throughout the course. This course will integrate a series of lectures with student-led discussion and presentations. Prerequisite: any 300-level Science course or consent of Department of Cell Biology. CELL 415 Developmental and Molecular Neurobiology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-2s-0). This course explores topics in developmental neurobiology, including cell lineage, nerve growth and guidance, myelination, synapse formation, axonal transport, and response to injury. In particular, the course emphasizes theoretical and experimental aspects, the expanding roles of molecular biology in studies in this field, and areas of present and future research. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Offered in odd-numbered years. CELL 425 Systems Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Systems biology is the molecular analysis of organisms and involves understanding the integrated and interacting network of genes, proteins and biochemical processes that give rise to what we define as life. Systems biology connects and integrates genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, engineering, cell biology and genetics with mathematics and computational analysis to enable the comprehensive discovery of principles underlying the functioning of living organisms. This course provides the student with the fundamentals of a systems biology approach to understanding organisms. Systems biology projects using database analysis software will be a large component of this course and therefore personal computers are required. Prerequisite CELL 201, BIOL 201 or consent of Department. CELL 445 Current Topics in Cell Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Appraisal of recent literature that defines significant advances in cellular and molecular biology research. Intended for fourth-year students interested in medical research. Information is provided in the form of review articles, primary research articles, guest lectures, and through student- led presentations and discussion. Introduces students to cellular and molecular biology research of outstanding quality and interest, and enhances their appraisal and presentation of scientific material. Prerequisites: Any 300-level Science course or consent of Department. Enrolment is limited and registration is by permission of the Department. CELL 498 Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-6). Directed research carried out in the laboratory of an assigned member of a department participating in the Cell Biology Program. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once. Successful completion requires a written report. Prerequisites: A 300-level CELL, Biological Sciences, or Biochemistry course and the consent of the Cell Biology Undergraduate Advisor. Go to Department website for project information. This course can also be taken as a six week Spring/Summer session course. www.ualberta.ca/cellbiology. CELL 499 Research Project Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, 0-0-6). Directed research carried out in the laboratory of an assigned member of a department participating in the Cell Biology Program. The project normally continues through both the Fall and Winter Terms. Successful completion of this course requires a written report and oral presentation on the research project. Prerequisite: A 300-level CELL, Biological Sciences, or Biochemistry course and the consent of the Cell Biology Undergraduate Advisor. Go to Department website for project information www.ualberta.ca/cellbiology

Graduate Courses CELL 502 The Birth and Death of a Cell Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). An advanced course dealing with cell differentiation,

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C Course Listings

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595

University of Alberta

Course Listings C

596

www.ualberta.ca

intracellular and extracellular signaling processes, the cell cycle, apoptosis and necrosis. Consists of lecture material and small group learning sessions. Topics include stem cell research, cancer therapy and human disorders involving cell death (e.g. Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular disease). Will require reading and discussion of current research articles. Lectures are the same as for CELL 402 but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. May not be taken if credit has already been obtained in CELL 402. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department.

CME 200 Introduction to Chemical and Materials Engineering Œ0.5 (fi 2) (first term, 1 day). Topics of interest to second year Chemical and Materials Engineering students, with special reference to industries in Alberta, including coverage of elements of ethics, equity, concepts of sustainable development and environmental stewardship, public and worker safety and health considerations including the context of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Act. Offered in a single day during the first week of September. Restricted to students registered in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering.

CELL 505 Cell Biology of Disease Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). This course will provide students with a cell biology perspective of disease processes, with special focus on the two major causes of death in humans: cancer and metabolic syndrome, which comprises diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, the nature and mechanisms of cellular processes altered in some inherited disorders and infectious diseases will also be examined. Emphasis will be placed on current research and cutting edge experimental methodologies used to explore abnormalities in the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs that underlie disease. Experimental highlights leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease and disease therapy will be given throughout the course. This course will integrate a series of lectures with student-led discussion and presentations. May not be taken if credit has already been obtained in CELL 405. Enrolment is limited and registration is by permission of the Department.

CME 265 Process Analysis Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3). Basic process principles; material and energy balances, transient processes, introduction to computer-aided balance calculations. Prerequisites: ENCMP 100, MATH 102 and CHEM 105. Corequisites: CH E 243 and MATH 209 or equivalent. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 265.

CELL 515 Developmental and Molecular Neurobiology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-2s-0). This course explores nine topics in developmental neurobiology, including cell lineage, nerve growth and guidance, myelination, synapse formation, axonal transport, and response to injury. In particular, the course will emphasize theoretical and experimental aspects, the expanding roles of molecular biology in studies in this field, and areas of present and future research. Lectures are the same as for CELL 415 but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken if credit has already been obtained in CELL 415. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Note: Offered in odd-numbered years. CELL 525 Systems Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Systems biology is the molecular analysis of organisms and involves understanding the integrated and interacting network of genes, proteins and biochemical processes that give rise to what we define as life. Systems biology connects and integrates genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, engineering, cell biology and genetics with mathematics and computational analysis to enable the comprehensive discovery of principles underlying the functioning of living organisms. This course provides the student with the fundamentals of a systems biology approach to understanding organisms. Systems biology projects using database analysis software will be a large component of this course and therefore personal computers are required. May not be taken if credit has already been obtained in CELL 425. Enrolment is limited and registration is by permission of the Department. CELL 545 Current Topics in Cell Biology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Appraisal of recent literature that defines significant advances in cellular and molecular biology research. Preference will be given to graduate students considering transfer to a PhD program. Information is provided in the form of review articles, primary research articles, guest lectures, and through student-led presentations and discussion. Introduces students to cellular and molecular biology research of outstanding quality and interest, and enhances their appraisal and presentation of scientific material. Lectures are the same as CELL 445, with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Class material will be updated yearly and therefore credit can be obtained for both CELL 445 and 545 taken in different years. Prerequisites: Consent of the Instructor. Please contact the Department for registration assistance. CELL 671 Recent Advances in Cell Biology Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s-0). A seminar course on topics of current interest in Cell Biology. Students will attend seminars and contribute a journal club presentation based on recent developments published in first rate journals. Note: Open only to Graduate students in Cell Biology. CELL 672 Recent Advances in Cell Biology Œ2 (fi 4) (two term, 0-1s-0). A seminar course on topics of current interest in Cell Biology. Students will attend seminars and contribute a presentation on their research project that includes original data. Prerequisite: CELL 671 or consent of the Department. Note: Open only to Graduate students in Cell Biology.

231.74

Chemical and Materials Engineering, CME Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering Faculty of Engineering

Undergraduate Courses The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. 

CME 421 Mineral Processing Œ3.8 (fi 8) (first term, 3-0-3/2). Unit operations employed to concentrate minerals including comminution, classification, gravity concentration, froth flotation, thickening, filtering; tailings disposal; marketing of minerals; economics. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained in MAT E 331. Prerequisite: STAT 235 or consent of Instructor. CME 422 Interfacial Engineering in Mineral Processing Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). An introduction to the principles of colloid and interface chemistry, with specific reference to the problems of fine and ultrafine particle processing, and techniques that have been developed in coal, oil sands, base metal and precious metal ore processing. Prerequisites: CME 421 and (CH E 343 or MAT E 301 or MAT E 340). CME 458 Special Projects in Chemical and Materials Engineering I Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 0-0-7). Projects in Chemical and Materials Engineering. This course is open only to Chemical and Materials Engineering students with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the previous two academic terms. Variable meeting times. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been earned in CH E 458, 459, MAT E 468 or 469. Prerequisite: consent of the Department. CME 459 Special Projects in Chemical and Materials Engineering II Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 0-0-7). Projects in Chemical and Materials Engineering. This course is open only to Chemical and Materials Engineering students with a GPA of 3.0 or greater during the previous two academic terms. Variable meeting times. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been earned in CH E 458, 459, MAT E 468 or 469. Prerequisite: CME 458 and consent of the Department. CME 472 Extractive Metallurgy Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Physical and chemical preparation of ore feed. Roasting, briquetting, sintering and pelletizing. Leaching processes and chemicals, kinetics of leaching, ion exchange, activated carbon adsorption, solvent extraction and McCabe-Thiele Diagram. Metal recovery from solutions, electrowinning and electrorefining. Furnaces and fuels, refractories, slags and mattes. Reduction of metal compounds, smelting and converting, pyrometallurgical metal refining. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credits have been obtained in MAT E 430 and MAT E 332. Prerequisites: CME 265, MAT E 341, or consent of the Department. CME 481 Colloquium I Œ1 (fi 3) (either term, 1-0-0). Communication and oral presentations. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: 85 units completed or consent of instructor. CME 482 Fundamentals of Polymers Œ3.5 (fi 8) (first term, 3-1s-0). Polymerization, molecular weight distribution, molecular weight measurement techniques, isomerism and conformation, rubber elasticity, glass transition, amorphous and crystalline states, crystallization and melting, tensile property, polymer melts and rheology, polymer solutions and blends. May include a tour to a local polymer manufacturer. Prerequisites: STAT 235, CH E 312 and (CH E 343 or MAT E 301 or 340). CME 483 Colloquium II Œ1 (fi 3) (second term, 1-0-0). Oral presentation of technical material. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: CME 481. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 483. CME 484 Polymer Processing Œ3 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-0). Non-Newtonian fluids, viscoelastic properties and models, diffusion and mass transfer, mixing, extrusion, molding and forming. Prerequisite: CME 482. CME 485 Polymerization Reactions Œ3 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-0). Step growth polymerization, Carothers equation, free radial chain polymerization, auto-acceleration, copolymerization, monomer reactivity ratios, ionic and coordination polymerizations, catalysts, living polymerization, kinetics, molecular weight distribution, dispersion and emulsion polymerizations, polymer reactor design and control. Prerequisites: CHEM 261, CH E 345 and CME 482.

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University of Alberta

www.ualberta.ca

597

CME 694 Advanced Topics in Chemical and Materials Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). An advanced treatment of selected chemical and materials engineering topics of current interest to staff and students.

CH E 416 Equilibrium Stage Processes Œ4 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-2). Design of separation processes with emphasis on the equilibrium stage concept, distillation, absorption and extraction. Prerequisites: CH E 343, 314 and 318. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 316.

CME 900 Directed Research Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned). An engineering project for students registered in a Master of Engineering program.

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The following courses were renumbered effective 2005-06 Old New Old New CH E 200 CME 200 CH E 683 CME CH E 265 CME 265 CH E 684 CME CH E 481 CME 481 CH E 685 CME CH E 483 CME 483 CH E 686 CME

681 682 683 684

The following courses were renumbered effective 2013-14 Old New CH E 572 CH E 472

Undergraduate Courses Note: The Chemical Engineering Department offers a regular academic term from May-August. Courses designated as “Spring/Summer” in this section of the Calendar are part of this academic term and normally run for the full May-August period. CH E 243 Engineering Thermodynamics Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). An introduction to the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Prerequisites: MATH 101. CH E 312 Fluid Mechanics Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid behavior; hydrostatics; buoyancy, application of Bernoulli and momentum equations; frictional losses through pipes, ducts, and fittings; pipe networks; pumps; drag on submerged bodies and flow through porous media. Prerequisites: CH E 243 EN PH 131 and MATH 209. Corequisite: MATH 201. CH E 314 Heat Transfer Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Principles of conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer. Design and performance analysis of thermal systems based on these principles. Prerequisites: MATH 201, CH E 312. Corequisite CH E 374. CH E 318 Mass Transfer Œ4 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-0-2). Molecular and turbulent diffusion; mass transfer coefficients; mass transfer equipment design including absorption and cooling towers, adsorption and ion exchange. Prerequisites: CME 265, CH E 312 and 343. Corequisite: CH E 314. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 418. CH E 343 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Thermodynamics of non-ideal gases and liquids; vapour-liquid equilibrium, thermodynamics of chemical processes and multicomponent systems. Prerequisite: CH E 243. Corequisite: CME 265. CH E 345 Chemical Reactor Analysis I Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Kinetics of chemical reactions and design of ideal chemical reactors. Prerequisites: CME 265, CH E 343 and 374. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 434. CH E 351 Chemical Engineering Laboratory Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 2-0-3). Technical report writing; thermodynamics, material, and energy balances, and calibration experiments. Prerequisites: ENGL 199 or equivalent, CME 265 and CH E 243. Corequisite: CH E 312. CH E 358 Process Data Analysis Œ5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-0-4). Statistical analysis of process data from chemical process plants and course laboratory experiments. Topics covered include least squares regression, analysis of variance, propagation of error, and design of experiments. Prerequisites: CH E 351 and STAT 235. Corequisites: CH  E 314 and 345.

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CH E 420 Mixing in the Process Industries Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Design and operation of mixing equipment in the process industries. Process results ranging from blending, solids suspension, and gas dispersion to reactor design and heat transfer will be covered. Emphasis is on application of the fundamentals of chemical engineering. Laminar and turbulent regimes, stirred tanks and static mixers, and other specialized applications will be discussed. Credit cannot be obtained in this course if credit has already been obtained in CH E 520. Corequisite: CH E 464. CH E 435 Oilsands Engineering Design Œ6 (fi 8) (second term, 4-0-4). Integration of chemical engineering practice, theory and economics into the design and evaluation of proposed capital projects in the oilsands industry. Prerequisites: CH E 416, 445 and 464. Registration restricted to students in the Oilsands Engineering Option. CH E 445 Chemical Reactor Analysis II Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Analysis and design of non-ideal chemical reactors for industrial product synthesis. Prerequisites: CH E 314, 318 and 345. CH E 446 Process Dynamics and Control Œ4 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-3/3). Introduction to process modeling and transient response analysis; design and analysis of feedback systems; stability analysis; process control applications; process control using digital computers. Prerequisites: MATH 201 and 209. Corequisite: CH E 312. CH E 448 Process Control for Mechanical Engineers Œ4 (fi 8) (second term, 3-1s-3/3). Introduction to systems modeling and transient response analysis with an emphasis on mechanical engineering applications; design and analysis of feedback systems; stability analysis; feedforward control; process control applications. Prerequisites: MATH 201 or equivalent, MATH 209, and MEC E 330 or MEC E 331. Corequisite: MEC E 370 or MEC E 371. Restricted to students registered in the Mechanical Engineering program. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 446. CH E 454 Chemical Engineering Project Laboratory Œ3 (fi 8) (second term, 1-0-4). Experiments in kinetics and mass transfer. Prerequisites: CH E 318, 345, 358, and 416. CH E 464 Chemical Engineering Design I Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-0-3). Engineering design concepts; cost estimation; project planning and scheduling; plant safety and hazards analysis; selected project design examples. Prerequisites: CH E 314, 345, and ENG M 310 or 401. Corequisite: CH E 416. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 365. CH E 465 Chemical Engineering Design II Œ6 (fi 8) (second term, 4-0-4). Integration of chemical engineering practice, theory and economics into the design and evaluation of proposed capital projects. Prerequisites: CH E 345, 416 and 464. CH E 472 Modelling Process Dynamics Œ4 (fi 8) (second term, 3-1s-3/3). Mechanistic and empirical modelling of process dynamics; continuous- and discrete-time models; model fitting and regression analysis. Corequisites: CH E 314, 318 and 345. Credit cannot be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 572. CH E 482 Environmental Impact of the Process Industries Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Industrial emissions, pollution control, and waste minimization. Special processes, design techniques and operating procedures related to environmental and ecological considerations. Corequisite: CH E 416. Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 502. CH E 484 Introduction to Biochemical Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-1). Physical and chemical properties of cells, tissues, and biological fluids, engineering analysis or processes such as cell growth and fermentation, purification of products. Prerequisites: CME 265 or BIOL 107, Credit may not be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 390. CH E 485 Fuel Cells and Their Applications Œ3 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to principles of operation of fuel cells and their applications; historical and environmental perspectives; elementary electrochemistry, types of fuel cell - fuels, membranes and liquid ion conductors, operating conditions; factors affecting performance; applications as standing engines

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C Course Listings

Graduate Courses

CH E 374 Computational Methods in Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Formulation and solution of chemical and materials engineering problems; solution of systems of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations; numerical interpolation, differentiation and integration; numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisites: ENCMP 100 (or equivalent). MATH 102, 201 and 209.

CME 494 Special Topics in Chemical and Materials Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Treatment of selected chemical and materials engineering special topics of current interest to staff and students.

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and mobile power sources. Limited to 3rd/4th year undergraduate students in engineering. Prerequisites: CH E 343, MAT E 202 or equivalent and MATH 201 or consent of Instructor.

CH E 612 Advanced Fluid Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Potential, boundary layer, viscometrics, and secondary flows; application to multiphase phenomena.

CH E 486 Microbial Processes in Engineering Œ3 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Review of fundamental bioprocesses including global nutrient cycling. Application of bioprocess knowledge to problem resolution under various thermodynamic conditions in areas such as water and pasture management and production of foods and drugs.

CH E 613 Selected Topics in Mass Transfer Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A study of fundamental mass transfer with emphasis on gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems.

CH E 494 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Treatment of selected chemical engineering special topics of current interest to staff and students. CH E 496 Special Topics in Process Dynamics and Control Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Treatment of selected topics in process dynamics and control. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. CH E 512 Introduction to Fluid-Particle Systems Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Unit operations studied in this course include: settlers, thickeners, centrifuges, slurry pipelines and flotation columns. Course topics will also include: one dimensional homogeneous and multiphase flows, sedimentation and fluidization of multi-species systems, and drift flux theory. Prerequisite: CH E 312. CH E 522 Fundamentals of Oil Sands Upgrading Œ4 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-3/3). Introduction to the physical, chemical and engineering principles required for the design and operation of plants used for the upgrading of heavy oils and bitumens. Prerequisite or corequisite: CH E 343. CH E 534 Fundamentals of Oilsands Extraction Œ4 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3/3). Application of fluid mechanics, interfacial phenomena and colloid science to bitumen extraction. Prerequisites: CH E 312 and 314. CH E 573 Digital Signal Processing for Chemical Engineers Œ3.8 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2). Time and frequency domain representation of signals; Fourier Transform; spectral analysis of data; analysis of multivariate data; treatment of outliers and missing values in industrial data; filter design. Prerequisites: CH E 358 and 446. CH E 576 Intermediate Process Control Œ3.8 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3/2). Digital and multivariable process control techniques; discrete-time analysis of dynamic systems; digital feedback control; Kalman filter and linear quadratic optimal control; model predictive control. Prerequisite: CH E 446 or equivalent. CH E 582 Introduction to Biomaterials Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0). Survey of materials intended for biological applications; biomaterials-related biological phenomena (protein adsorption, blood coagulation and cell adhesion); biomaterials for engineering of blood vessel, bone and skin tissues. Two fundamental engineering philosophies will be stressed: structure-function relationship and purposeful manipulation for a desired outcome. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 or BME 210 or CH E 484 or consent of Instructor. CH E 583 Surfaces and Colloids Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-1s-0). Interactions between fluid phases and solids; micelles; electrokinetic phenomena; adsorption isotherms; applications to industrial processes. Prerequisite: CH E 343. Credit cannot be obtained in this course if previous credit has been obtained for CH E 436. CH E 584 Molecular Sieve Technology Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0). Structures and properties of molecular sieves and related materials. Applications of molecular sieves in separation processes based on molecular size differences as well as thermodynamic interactions between active surfaces and adsorbates. Molecular sieves in purification processes based on cationic exchange reactions and selective adsorption. Molecular sieves as catalysts. Prerequisites: CHEM 105 and CH E 243.

Graduate Courses Note: All 500-level courses may be taken for graduate credit subject to the approval of the student’s supervisory committee and departmental restrictions on the number of such courses that a student’s program may contain. CH E 610 Computational Transport Phenomena Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Solutions of the transport equations of momentum, mass and energy. Transport processes are reviewed but emphasis is placed on the numerical solution of the governing differential equations. Different solution methodologies and software are presented. CH E 611 Advanced Transport Phenomena Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Transport expressions for physical properties are combined with conservation laws to yield generalized equations used to solve a variety of engineering problems in fluid mechanics, and heat and mass transfer; steady-state and transient cases; special topics in non-Newtonian flow and forced diffusion.

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CH E 614 Fluid-Particle Systems and Applications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Fundamental physical laws governing the behaviour of fluidparticle systems. Particle agglomeration and non-Newtonian pipeline flows; flow through porous media; particle settling; multiparticle drag relationships; particle interactions in dense, coarse particle slurry flows; flowing granular solids. Application of the physical laws in paste or thickened tailings pipelining; horizontal oil well production; oil sand hydrotransport; and bulk solids handling. CH E 615 Advanced Separation Processes Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Characterization, selection and design of equilibrium and rate-governed separation processes. Topics include capacity and efficiency of mass transfer equipment and process energy requirements. CH E 617 Colloids and Interfaces Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Emphasis is on the basics of colloid and interfacial phenomena. Aimed at upper level and graduate students in chemical and mineral engineering, chemistry and geochemistry with an interest in application to the energy sector, mineral processing, materials handling, and chemical industry. CH E 620 Mixing in the Process Industries Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0). Design and operation of mixing equipment in the process industries. Process results ranging from blending, solids suspension, and gas dispersion to reactor design and heat transfer will be covered. Laminar and turbulent regimes, stirred tanks and static mixers, and other specialized applications will be discussed. The course integrates fundamental chemical engineering concepts with equipment design, mixing theory, and turbulence theory. Credit cannot be obtained in this course if credit was previously obtained in CH E 420 or CH E 520. CH E 624 Advanced Thermodynamics Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Principles of thermodynamics; properties of homogeneous fluid phases; phase and chemical equilibria; application to industrial problems. CH E 625 Advanced Macroscopic and Statistical Thermodynamics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced topics in macroscopic thermodynamics and fundamentals of statistical thermodynamics. Thermodynamics of composite systems including surface thermodynamics and thermodynamics in fields. Introduction to quantum mechanics. Principles of statistical thermodynamics. Construction of partition functions and calculations of basic thermodynamic properties for several fundamental systems. Applications will include properties of ideal gases, ideal solids and adsorbed gases. CH E 632 Polymer Melt Processing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Fluid mechanical fundamentals of melt processing operations. Extrusion, fibre spinning, calendering, moulding. Incorporation of continuum rheological models into equations of motion to predict behavior of engineering relevance. Description of anomalies arising from melt elasticity and methods of mitigating these. CH E 634 Advanced Chemical Reactor Design Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Design of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactors for isothermal and non-isothermal operation; analysis of rate data; transport processes in heterogeneous catalytic systems. CH E 645 Heterogeneous Catalysis and Reactor Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Principles of heterogeneous catalysis and reactor analysis with emphasis on industrial catalytic reactions; characterization of heterogeneous catalysts. CH E 655 Advanced Biomaterials Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Intended for graduate students who are familiar with basic biomaterials science. Focuses on: molecular design of biomaterial and biomaterial surfaces in order to modulate specific biological events; techniques to modulate biomaterial properties; assessment techniques for modifications. The biological events will be studied at the cellular and molecular level. CH E 662 Process Identification Œ3.8 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Selected topics related to empirical modelling of process systems are undertaken. Emphasis on time-series based modelling theory and techniques, (e.g., nonparametric, parametric, spectrum analysis, nonlinear, and closed-loop identification methods), model validation, experimental design, and applications in forecasting, analysis, and control. CH E 674 Numerical Solutions of Engineering Problems Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Numerical solutions of engineering problems using linear and nonlinear sets of equations, ordinary and partial differential equations. CH E 675 Stochastic Dynamic Optimization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Robust optimization; introduction to stochastic

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biochemical, environmental, and materials science. Students who have obtained credit for CHEM 331 cannot take CHEM 241 for credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or 105 and CHEM 161 or 164 or 261; or SCI 100.

CH E 676 Model Predictive Control Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Model predictive control; constrained optimization; state estimation; nonlinear optimization; linear quadratic control.

CHEM 243 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). An extension of CHEM 241 with emphasis on the bonding, structure, and reactivity of transition-metal elements. The course will include applications in industrial, biochemical, environmental, and materials science. For Chemistry Honors and Specialization students only, except by consent of Department. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been received in CHEM 341. Prerequisites: CHEM 241 or consent of Department.

CH E 689 Polymer Properties Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Polymerization, molar mass distributions, polymer analytical techniques, solution and blend thermodynamics, physical and chemical properties of polymers, lattice models, rubber thermodynamics, polymer processing, fluid flow and heat transfer in melt processing, special polymer project. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Not open to students with credit in MAT E 467 or CH E 539. CH E 694 Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An advanced treatment of selected chemical engineering topics of current interest to staff and students. CH E 696 Special Topics in Process Dynamics and Control Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced treatment of selected topics in process dynamics and/or computer process control of current interest to staff and students. CH E 900 Directed Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned).

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Chemistry, CHEM Department of Chemistry Faculty of Science

Undergraduate Courses CHEM 101 Introductory University Chemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). Atoms and molecules, states of matter, chemistry of the elements. Prerequisite: Chemistry 30, or equivalent. CHEM 102 Introductory University Chemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). Rates of reactions, thermodynamics and equilibrium, electro-chemistry, modern applications of chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 101. CHEM 103 Introductory University Chemistry I Œ4.3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3/2). Atoms and molecules, states of matter, chemistry of the elements. Prerequisite: Chemistry 30, or equivalent. Note: Restricted to Engineering students only. Other students who take this course will receive Œ3.0. CHEM 105 Introductory University Chemistry II Œ3.8 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Rates of reactions, thermodynamics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, modern applications of chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 103. Note: Restricted to Engineering students only. Other students who take this course will receive Œ3.0. CHEM 164 Organic Chemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). The study of basic molecular structure and reactivity of organic compounds based on their functional groups. Introduction to nomenclature, three dimensional structure, physical properties, and reactivity of compounds of carbon. Functional groups covered will emphasize alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and some aromatics. Examples will include hydrocarbons (petroleum products), halogenated organic compounds (e.g., pesticides), and polymers of industrial importance which may be found in everyday life. Note: Students who already have credit in CHEM 101 must register in CHEM 261. Prerequisite: Chemistry 30 or equivalent. Restricted to students with CHEM 30 averages of 90% or higher, or departmental approval. CHEM 211 Quantitative Analysis I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-4). Principles, methods, and experimental applications emphasizing solution phase equilibria, titrimetry, volumetric laboratory skills, evaluation of experimental data, and experimental applications of electrochemistry. Includes examples of organic and inorganic analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or SCI 100. CHEM 213 Quantitative Analysis II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-4). A continuation of CHEM 211 emphasizing the principles, methods, and experimental applications of separation techniques, and atomic and molecular spectrometry, and evaluation of experimental data. Includes examples of organic and inorganic analysis and use of the analytical literature. Prerequisite: CHEM 211. Students who have previously taken CHEM 313 may not take CHEM 213 for credit. CHEM 241 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). The chemistry of main-group elements including a survey of the structure, bonding, and reactivity of their compounds. Transition-metal chemistry will be introduced. The course will include applications in industrial,

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CHEM 261 Organic Chemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). The correlation of structure and chemical bonding in carbon compounds with the physical properties and chemical reactivity of organic molecules. Discussion will be based on functional groups with emphasis on hydrocarbons and derivatives that contain halogens, oxygen, sulfur, and the hydroxy group. Introduction to stereochemistry, three dimensional structure, reaction mechanisms, especially addition to double bonds, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions. Prerequisite CHEM 101 or 103. Note: Students who have obtained credit for CHEM 161 or 164 cannot take CHEM 261 for credit. Engineering students who take this course will receive Œ4.5. CHEM 263 Organic Chemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Continuation of the structural and chemical properties of the basic functional groups of organic compounds including alkynes, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives and amines. Illustration of these functional groups in natural products such as carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Discussion of the application of spectroscopic methods for the structure determination in simple organic molecules. Prerequisites: CHEM 161 or 164 or 261 or SCI 100. Note: Students who have obtained credit for CHEM 163 cannot take CHEM 263 for credit. CHEM 282 Atomic and Molecular Structure Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-4). An introduction to the quantum view of nature with applications to atomic and molecular structure. Methods to describe the quantum world are introduced, used to describe simple electronic, vibrational and rotational structure of model systems, and applied to the hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms, simple diatomic molecules, and the electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. The laboratory portion of the course consists of practical applications enriching and illustrating the lecture material, and incorporates the use of computers as a routine aid to processing experimental results. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or 105; one 200-level CHEM course; MATH 115 and PHYS 124 or 144. Corequisite: PHYS 146 if PHYS 144 presented as a prerequisite instead of PHYS 124. Students with SCI 100 have prerequisite requirements. CHEM 298 Introductory Spectroscopy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). The course is an integrated introduction to the qualitative and instrumentation aspects of spectroscopy and its applications in chemistry. The subjects will include: absorption, emission, vibrational and rotational spectroscopy of atoms and molecules; and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. For Chemistry Honors and Specialization students only, except by consent of Department. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 105 or SCI 100; CHEM 163 or 263. CHEM 299 Research Opportunity Program in Chemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 0-0-3). A credit/no-credit course for supervised participation in a faculty research project. Normally taken after completion of a minimum of Œ30 but not more than Œ60 in a program in the Faculty of Science. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.5 or higher, CHEM 101 or 161 or SCI 100; and consent of Department. Specific projects may require additional prerequisites. Project and course information available at ROP website or Department of Chemistry. Prospective enrollees in CHEM 299 must apply to Department of Chemistry. Application does not guarantee an ROP position. Credit for this course may be obtained twice. CHEM 300 Introduction to Industrial Chemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (first term, 1.5-0-0). A credit/no-credit course that introduces students to the practices, environment, concepts, and other issues associated with the industrial workplace. Course includes lectures by professionals from the local chemical industry, industrial tours, and professional skills development such as resume writing and interviewing. Normally taken after completion of a minimum of 60 but not more than 90 units of course weight in a program in the Department of Chemistry. The course is offered for Chemistry Honors and Specialization students, and for General Science students with consent. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.3 or higher and consent of Department. CHEM 303 Environmental Chemistry I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). The chemistry of environmental processes. Atmospheric chemistry; thermal and photochemical reactions of atmospheric gases including oxygen, ozone, hydroxy radical, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur. Aquatic chemistry; characterization, reactions, and equilibria of dissolved species, water purification treatments. Metals and organohalides in the environment. Risk assessment. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or SCI 100; CHEM 164 or 261; CHEM 263; and one 200-level CHEM course or CH E 243.

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C Course Listings

programming; Markov decision making process; stochastic dynamic programming for sequential decision making problems under uncertainty; linear quadratic control.

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CHEM 305 Environmental Chemistry II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-4). The lecture and laboratory portions of this course will highlight adsorption from aqueous solutions, convective/diffusive transport, vapour/solution equilibria, coagulation of colloids, sedimentation, ion exchange, computer modeling of complex systems, trace analysis of pesticides, chemical treatment of hazardous wastes. Quantitative calculations will be emphasized. The lecture component will provide theoretical background for experiments and instrumentation used for chemical measurements. Prerequisites: CHEM 263; CHEM 213 or 298 or 313; CHEM 303 or 373. Note: Restricted to students in the Environmental Physical Sciences and Chemistry (Honors, Specialization, and General Science with concentration in Chemistry) programs. CHEM 313 Instrumentation in Chemical Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-4). Instrumentation and analytical applications of spectroscopic, chromatographic and electroanalytical methods are discussed and applied in the laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 211; Œ6 in junior Physics recommended. CHEM 333 Inorganic Materials Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Fundamentals of the synthesis, structure and properties of inorganic solids, thin films, and nanoscale materials, to be complemented with case studies of modern applications of inorganic materials; selected topics such as catalysis, molecular and nanoparticle-based computing, telecommunications, alternative energies, superconductivity, biomedical technologies, and information storage will be discussed. Techniques for characterization and analysis of materials on the nano and atomic level will be introduced. Prerequisite: CHEM 241. CHEM 361 Organic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-4). Mechanisms and reactions of aromatic and aliphatic compounds. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or SCI 100; CHEM 163 or 263. CHEM 363 Organic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-4). A continuation of CHEM 361. Prerequisite: CHEM 361. CHEM 371 Energetics of Chemical Reactions Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-3). A study of the implications of the laws of thermodynamics for transformations of matter including phase changes, chemical reactions, and biological processes. Topics include: thermochemistry; entropy change and spontaneity of processes; activity and chemical potential; chemical and phase equilibria; properties of solutions; simple one- and two-component phase diagrams. The conceptual development of thermodynamic principles from both macroscopic and molecular levels, and the application of these principles to systems of interest to chemists, biochemists, and engineers will be emphasized. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been received in CHEM 271. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or 105; MATH 101 or 115. SCI 100 may be used in lieu of CHEM 102 and MATH 115. Engineering students who take this course will receive Œ4.5. CHEM 373 Physical Properties and Dynamics of Chemical Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-3). A continuation of CHEM 371 in which the physical properties of chemical systems and the dynamics and energetics of chemical processes are discussed. Topics include: colligative properties; electrochemical cells and ion activities, implications for ionic equilibria; kinetic theory and transport properties of gases and liquids; surfaces and colloid chemistry; reaction dynamics, detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions, catalysis. The emphasis will be on the development of principles of physical chemistry and their application to properties and processes of interest to chemists, biochemists, and engineers. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been received in CHEM 273 or 275. Prerequisite: CHEM 371 or 271. CHEM 398 Molecular Spectroscopy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An integrated course in the quantitative and more advanced aspects of spectroscopy and its applications in chemistry. The subjects will include: absorption, emission, dichroism, vibrational and rotational spectroscopy of molecules; time-resolved spectroscopy; and electron spin and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 282; 298; 243. CHEM 400 Industrial Internship Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Required by all students who have just completed a Chemistry Industrial Internship program. Must be completed during the first academic term following return to full-time studies. Note: A grade of F to A+ will be determined by the student’s job performance as evaluated by the employer, by the student’s performance in the completion of an internship practicum report, and by the student’s ability demonstrated in an oral presentation. This course cannot be used in place of a senior-level CHEM option. Prerequisite: WKEXP 956. CHEM 401 Introduction to Chemical Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-8). Introduction to methods of chemical research. Investigational work under the direction of a member of the Department. The results of the research will be submitted to the Department as a report which will be graded. The student must also make an oral presentation of this work to the Department. For students in the fourth year of Honors or Specialization Chemistry. Students should consult with the Course Coordinator four months

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prior to starting the course. Prerequisites: a 300-level CHEM course and consent of the Course Coordinator. CHEM 403 Chemical Research Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-1s-8). Investigational work under the direction of a member of the Department. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 401. CHEM 405 Special Topics in Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: a 300-level CHEM course and consent of Instructor. CHEM 406 Special Topics in Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisites: vary depending on topic. Check course notes on Bear Tracks for specific prerequisites. CHEM 419 Bioanalytical Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the methods used to analyze biomolecules and the analytical methods that exploit the molecular recognition properties of biomolecules. Topics may include an introduction to biomolecule structure and function, enzyme assays, immunoassays, biosensors, electrophoresis, DNA sequencing techniques, bioinformatics and molecular visualization, molecular biology, and fluorescence imaging. Prerequisite: CHEM 313. CHEM 424 Optical Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry and principles and applications to chemical analysis. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy for probing and monitoring chemical and biochemical systems. Electrode kinetics, mass transport, and voltammetry for electroanalysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 313. CHEM 425 Separations and Mass Spectrometry Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Concepts and techniques in chromatography, mass spectrometry, and chromatography/MS combinations. Examples of modern instrumentation as well as applications to chemical, biochemical, and biomedical analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 313. CHEM 434 X-ray Crystallography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to structure determination by singlecrystal X-ray diffraction methods. Topics include X-ray diffraction, crystal symmetry, experimental methods, structure solution, refinement, crystallographic software, and interpretation of crystal structure data. Prerequisite: CHEM 243 and one 300-level CHEM course; or CHEM 333 or 341; or consent of the instructor. CHEM 436 Synthesis and Applications of Inorganic and Nano-materials Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to methods of synthesizing inorganic materials with control of atomic, meso- and micro-structure. Topics include sol-gel chemistry, chemical vapor deposition, solid state reactions, solid-state metathesis and high-temperature self-propagating reactions, template directed syntheses of micro and mesoporous materials, micelles and colloids, synthesis of nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Applications of these synthetic techniques to applications such as photonic materials, heterogeneous catalysts, magnetic data storage media, nanoelectronics, display technologies, alternative energy technologies, and composite materials will be discussed. Prerequisite: CHEM 243 and one 300-level CHEM course; or CHEM 341; or CHEM 333; or consent of the instructor. CHEM 437 Transition Metal Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CHEM 437 is an introduction to organotransition metal chemistry. The course will deal with the synthesis, basic bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metal complexes. Topics to be covered include transition metal complexes of hydrides, phosphines, carbonyls, olefins, alkynes, polyolefins, cyclopentadienyl and related cyclic pi-ligands; metal-carbon sigma- and multiple bonds. The application of these complexes to homogeneous catalysis and to organic synthesis will be discussed when appropriate. Prerequisite: CHEM 243 and one 300-level CHEM course; or CHEM 341; or consent of the instructor. CHEM 438 Solid State Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the chemistry of extended inorganic solids. The topics covered include synthesis, symmetry, descriptive crystal chemistry, bonding, electronic band structures, characterization techniques, and phase diagrams. The correlation of structure with properties of electronic and magnetic materials will be discussed. Prerequisite: CHEM 243 and one 300-level CHEM course; or CHEM 333 or 341 or consent of the instructor. CHEM 443 Asymmetric Catalysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introductory course on asymmetric catalysis. Emphasis will be on reactions catalyzed by chiral transition metal complexes, but non-metal catalyzed reactions and heterogeneous catalysis will be covered. Topics include the general principles of catalysis; mechanisms of common steps in catalytic cycles; rapid pre-equilibrium and steady-state kinetic treatments of catalytic rates; the origins of catalytic selection; and the strategies and principles of new catalyst, ligand, and reaction development. The course will include a survey of common enantioselective catalytic reactions and daily examples from ASAP articles that illustrate the principles and theories being taught in the course. Introductory level knowledge of transition metal and organic chemistry is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 243 and one 300-level chemistry course. CHEM 444 Characterization Methods in Nanoscience Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to techniques in determining the

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University of Alberta

CHEM 461 Qualitative Organic Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-4). Introductory discussion of the physical techniques used in organic chemistry research for the separation/purification and structural elucidation of organic compounds. Emphasis is on the combined use of modern one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. There is a laboratory component to this course. Prerequisite: CHEM 363 or consent of Prerequisite: CHEM 363 or consent of Instructor. CHEM 462 Physical Organic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Discussion of organic structural theories, intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in organic chemistry, and the mechanisms and reactive intermediates involved in organic reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 363 or consent of Instructor. CHEM 463 Organic Synthesis Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Discussion of the different concepts of chemoselective, regioselective and stereoselective reactions of organic compounds. Main classes of reactions described are oxidations, reductions, functional group protection, and carbon-carbon bond formation methods for single, double, and triple bonds. Emphasis on modern methodology for organic synthesis, including asymmetric catalysis and transition-metal catalyzed methods such as cross-coupling chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 363 or consent of Instructor. CHEM 464 Bioconjugate Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Discussion of organic reactions to modify or label biopolymers including proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Topics will include mechanistic and methodological details of commonly employed reactions used for chemoselective labeling or modification of biomolecules to produce synthetic bioconjugates. Applications including synthetic vaccines, antibody-drug conjugates, and native chemical ligation will be discussed. Prerequisites: CHEM 361 and BIOCH 200, or consent of instructor. CHEM 477 Molecular Symmetry and Spectroscopy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Application of the principles of molecular symmetry to molecular properties. Topics include group theory with emphasis on vibrational motion and normal vibrations; quantum mechanics of vibration and rotation; magnetic resonance spectroscopy; perturbation methods; selection rules in rotational, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy; molecular symmetry and molecular orbitals; electronic spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules. Prerequisite: CHEM 383; or CHEM 282 and CHEM 298 and one 300-level Chemistry course; or consent of Instructor. CHEM 479 Molecular Kinetics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Rate laws for simple and complex reactions, reaction mechanisms, potential energy surfaces, molecular dynamics, theories of reaction rates, catalysis, with application to gas and liquid phase reactions, photochemical reactions in chemistry and biology, and enzyme catalysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 273 or CHEM 373; MATH 215, PHYS 230, and a 300-level Chemistry course. CHEM 483 Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and some of its applications to chemical systems. The curriculum includes: (1) a cursory discussion of first order NMR spectra; (2) quantum mechanics of spin systems and a quantum description of magnetic resonance experiments (the Bloch equations); (3) relaxation effects; (4) Fourier transform spectroscopy; (5) chemical exchange effects; (6) nuclear Overhauser effects; and (7) two dimensional NMR. Prerequisite: CHEM 383; or CHEM 282 and CHEM 298 and one 300-level Chemistry course; or consent of Instructor. CHEM 489 Biomolecular Spectroscopy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Focus is on electronic and vibrational spectroscopic techniques, and their application to biological molecules. Particular emphasis on the use of absorption, luminescence, infra-red, and Raman spectroscopies, and dichroic techniques in probing the structure and dynamics of biological molecules. A significant portion of the course will also include the general study of excited state photophysics and photochemistry, with specific examples in biology. Prerequisite: CHEM 298 and one 300-level Chemistry course or CHEM 383. CHEM 493 Computational Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-2). The focus is on applications in this course which introduces the student to contemporary computational quantum chemistry (Hartree-Fock, post-Hartree-Fock, and density functional theory methods), using

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the state of-the-art computer code GAMESS-US running on UNIX workstations and computer servers. Elementary introduction to the UNIX operating system is given. Subjects include: basis sets; optimization of molecular geometry; prediction of molecular properties; calculation of infra-red and Raman spectra; excited electronic states; solvent effects; computational thermochemistry; mechanisms of chemical reactions; visualization of results. Assignments in the course allow the student to acquire practical computational experience that relates to chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 383 or CHEM 282 and one 300-level chemistry course or consent of Instructor. CHEM 495 Molecular Dynamics and its Applications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to Molecular Dynamics and its applications. The fundamentals of statistical mechanics are reviewed and computational tools such as molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods are presented. Applications include the study of structural properties of liquids, the diffusion of a solute in a solvent, the dynamics of proton transfer, and the calculation of rate constants. These topics will be exemplified using computer simulations as problem set assignments. Some lectures will take place in the computer laboratory where visualization tools will be used to illustrate various applications of molecular dynamics. Prerequisite: CHEM 282 and one 300-level CHEM course; or CHEM 383; or consent of the instructor.

Graduate Courses CHEM 502 Departmental Research Seminar Œ0 (fi 2) (either term, 0-2s-0). Course may be repeated. CHEM 504 Advanced Research Seminar Œ0 (fi 4) (two term, 0-2s-0). CHEM 505 Special Topics in Chemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 3/2-0-0). Course may be repeated for credit, provided there is no duplication of specific topic. CHEM 506 Special Topics in Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CHEM 511 Biomolecular Chemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course with topics that may include: biomolecule structure and function, enzymology, molecular biology, protein engineering, bioconjugate chemistry, bioinformatics and molecular visualization. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 419. CHEM 512 Optical Spectroscopy Œ1.5 (fi 3) (first term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course on optical spectroscopy. Topics may include electromagnetic spectrum, transitions and selection rules, instrumentation, atomic spectroscopy, molecular absorption, fluorescence, vibrational spectroscopy, applications of optical spectroscopy. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 424. CHEM 514 Electrochemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (first term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course on electrochemistry. Topics may include electrochemical potentials, junction potentials, interfaces, potentiometry/ ion selective electrodes, kinetics, electron transport theory, mass transport, voltammetry, microelectrodes, solid electrodes. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 424. CHEM 516 Separations Œ1.5 (fi 3) (first term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course on separations with topics that may include LC, GC, intermolecular forces, retention mechanisms, gradient elution, separation optimization, band broadening, HPLC modes-reversed phase, size exclusion, ion exchange, HILIC. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 425. CHEM 518 Mass Spectrometry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (first term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course on mass spectrometry with topics that may include mass analyzers, sample introduction techniques, ionization techniques, ion detection and data systems, applications. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 425. CHEM 519 Bioanalytical Chemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course with topics that may include antibodies, immunoassays, surface plasmon resonance, biosensors, gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing, microscopy and imaging. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 419. CHEM 520 Electronics Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course on electronics with topics that may include: linear electronics, including operational amplifiers; digital electronics, including timing circuits; counters and logic; fundamental and practical sources of noise in electronic circuits; data processing, including filtering. Prerequisite: consent of department. CHEM 522 Surface Chemistry and Analysis Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course with topics that may include surface preparation and selectivity, probes of surface composition and structure, Surface Optical Spectroscopy (FTIR, reflectance, Raman) Surface Enhanced

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C Course Listings

composition and structure of materials on the nanometer scale. Characterization of atomic, meso-, and microstructure of materials including impurities and defects. Major topics will include electron microscopy (transmission, scanning, and Auger) and associated spectroscopies (EDX, EELS), surface sensitive spectroscopies (e.g., XPS, AES, IR) and spectrometry (SIMS), synchrotron techniques, X-ray absorption, fluorescence and emission, and scanned probe microscopies (AFM, STM, etc.). The strengths, weaknesses, and complementarity of the techniques used will be examined via case studies on the characterization of real-world nanotechnologies, such as heterogeneous catalysts, surfaces and interfaces in semiconductor devices, organic monolayers on metals and semiconductors, nanotube- and nanowirebased electronics, and biocompatible materials. Prerequisite: 4th year standing or consent of instructor.

601

Course Listings C

602

University of Alberta

Raman Spectroscopy, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, chemical modification of surfaces. CHEM 531 Organometallic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: CHEM 437 or consent of Department. CHEM 534 X-ray Crystallography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to structure determination by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Topics include X-ray diffraction, crystal symmetry, experimental methods, structure solution, refinement, crystallographic software, and interpretation of crystal structure data. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 433 or 434. CHEM 536 Synthesis and Applications of Inorganic and Nano-materials Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to methods of synthesizing inorganic materials with control of atomic, meso-, and micro-structure. Topics include sol-gel chemistry, chemical vapor deposition, solid-state reactions, solid-state metathesis and high-temperature self-propagating reactions, template-directed syntheses of micro and mesoporous materials, micelles and colloids, synthesis of nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Applications of these synthetic techniques to applications such as photonic materials, heterogeneous catalysts, magnetic data storage media, nanoelectronics, display technologies, alternative energy technologies, and composite materials will be discussed. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 436. CHEM 537 Transition Metal Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Graduate level course on organotransition metal chemistry. The course will deal with the synthesis, bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metal complexes. Topics to be covered include transition metal complexes of hydrides, phosphines, carbonyls, olefins, alkynes, polyolefins, cyclopentadienyl and related cyclic pi-ligands; metal-carbon sigma- and multiple bonds. The application of these complexes to homogeneous catalysis and to organic syntheses will be discussed when appropriate. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 437. CHEM 538 Solid State Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the chemistry of extended inorganic solids. The topics covered include synthesis, symmetry, descriptive crystal chemistry, bonding, electronic band structures, characterization techniques, and phase diagrams. The correlation of structure with properties of electronic and magnetic materials will be discussed. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 438. CHEM 543 Asymmetric Catalysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introductory course on asymmetric catalysis. Emphasis will be on reactions catalyzed by chiral transition metal complexes, but non-metal catalyzed reactions and heterogeneous catalysis will be covered. Topics include the general principles of catalysis; mechanisms of common steps in catalytic cycles; rapid pre-equilibrium and steady-state kinetic treatments of catalytic rates; the origins of catalytic selection; and the strategies and principles of new catalyst, ligand, and reaction development. The course will include a survey of common enantioselective catalytic reactions and daily examples from ASAP articles that illustrate the principles and theories being taught in the course. Introductory level knowledge of transition metal and organic chemistry is required. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 443 or 533. CHEM 544 Characterization Methods in Nanoscience Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to techniques in determining the composition and structure of materials on the nanometer scale. Characterization of atomic, meso-, and micro-structure of materials including impurities and defects. Major topics will include electron microscopy (transmission, scanning, and Auger) and associated spectroscopies (EDX, EELS), surface sensitive spectroscopies (e.g., XPS, AES, IR) and spectrometry (SIMS), synchrotron techniques, X-ray absorption, fluorescence and emission, and scanned probe microscopies (AFM, STM, etc.). The techniques will be examined through real-world nanotechnology case studies. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 444. CHEM 545 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CHEM 561 Qualitative Organic Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-4). Introductory graduate-level discussion of the physical techniques used in organic chemistry research for the separation/ purification and structural elucidation of organic compounds. Emphasis is on the combined use of modern spectrometric techniques for structure determination, with particular focus on an introduction to modern one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. There is a laboratory component to this course. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 461. CHEM 562 Physical Organic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Graduate-level discussion of organic structural theories, intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in organic chemistry, and the mechanisms and reactive intermediates involved in organic reactions. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 462 or 465.

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CHEM 563 Organic Synthesis Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Graduate-level discussion of the different concepts of chemoselective, regioselective and stereoselective reactions of organic compounds. Main classes of reactions described are oxidations, reductions, functional group protection, and carbon-carbon bond formation methods for single, double, and triple bonds. Emphasis on modern methodology for organic synthesis, including asymmetric catalysis and transition-metal catalyzed methods such as cross-coupling chemistry. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 463 or 467. CHEM 564 Bioconjugate Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Graduate-level discussion of organic reactions to modify or label biopolymers including proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Topics will include mechanistic and methodological details of commonly employed reactions used for chemoselective labeling or modification of biomolecules to produce synthetic bioconjugates. Applications including synthetic vaccines, antibodydrug conjugates, and native chemical ligation will be discussed. Prerequisite: 1 year of introductory organic chemistry and 1 term of biochemistry, or consent of instructor. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 464. CHEM 577 Molecular Symmetry and Spectroscopy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Application of the principles of molecular symmetry to molecular properties. Topics include group theory with emphasis on vibrational motion and normal vibrations; quantum mechanics of vibration and rotation; magnetic resonance spectroscopy; perturbation methods; selection rules in rotational, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy; molecular symmetry and molecular orbitals; electronic spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 477. CHEM 579 Molecular Kinetics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Rate laws: for simple and complex reactions, reaction mechanisms, potential energy surfaces, molecular dynamics, theories of reaction rates, catalysis, with application to gas and liquid phase reactions, photochemical reactions in chemistry and biology, and enzyme catalysis. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 479. CHEM 583 Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and some of its applications to chemical systems. The curriculum includes: (1) a cursory discussion of first order NMR spectra; (2) quantum mechanics of spin systems and a quantum description of magnetic resonance experiments (the Bloch equations); (3) relaxation effects; (4) Fourier transform spectroscopy; (5) chemical exchange effects; (6) nuclear Overhauser effects; and (7) two-dimensional NMR. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 483. CHEM 589 Biomolecular Spectroscopy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Focus is on electronic and vibrational spectroscopic techniques, and their application to biological molecules. Particular emphasis on the use of absorption, luminescence, infrared, and Raman spectroscopies, and dichroic techniques in probing the structure and dynamics of biological molecules. A significant portion of the course will also include the general study of excited state photophysics and photochemistry, with specific examples in biology. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 489. CHEM 593 Computational Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-2). The focus is on applications in this course which introduces the student to contemporary computational quantum chemistry (Hartree-Fock, post-Hartree-Fock, and density functional theory methods), using the state-of-the-art computer code GAMESS-US running on UNIX workstations and computer servers. Elementary introduction to the UNIX operating system is given. Subjects include: basis sets; optimization of molecular geometry; prediction of molecular properties; calculation of infra-red and Raman spectra; excited electronic states; solvent effects; computational thermochemistry; mechanisms of chemical reactions; visualization of results. Assignments in the course allow the student to acquire practical experience that relates to chemistry. Term projects focus on chemistry related to student’s research area. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 493. CHEM 595 Molecular Dynamics and its Applications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to Molecular Dynamics and its applications. The fundamentals of statistical mechanics are reviewed and computational tools such as molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods are presented. Applications include the study of structural properties of liquids, the diffusion of a solute in a solvent, the dynamics of proton transfer, and the calculation of rate constants. These topics will be exemplified using computer simulations as problem set assignments. Some lectures will take place in the computer laboratory where visualization tools will be used to illustrate various applications of molecular dynamics. Not open to students with credit in CHEM 495. CHEM 612 Advanced Optical Spectroscopy Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course with topics that may include: sources, wavelength analyzers, interferometers, detectors, signal/noise, signal processing, advanced Raman spectroscopy, single molecule fluorescence and fluorescence imaging, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 512.

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University of Alberta

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CHEM 616 Advanced Separations Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course with topics that may include: multidimensional separations, ion chromatography, CE, biological HPLC, advanced sample preparation/introduction techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 516. CHEM 618 Advanced Mass Spectrometry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course with topics that may include: mass analyzers and ionization techniques, vacuum systems, advanced sample introduction techniques, tandem MS, mass spectral interpretation, quantitative MS, MS applications. Prerequisite: CHEM 518. CHEM 623 Special Topics in Advanced Analytical Chemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (either term, 3/2-0-0). Course may be repeated for credit, provided there is no duplication of specific topic. CHEM 665 Special Topics in Physical Organic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced treatment of selected topics in modern physical organic chemistry, drawn from one or more of the following: (1) molecular recognition, (2) organic materials and devices, and (3) multidimensional NMR spectroscopic analysis. Other topic selections appropriate to the category may also be offered. Course may be repeated for credit, provided there is no duplication of specific topic. CHEM 667 Special Topics in Synthetic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced treatment of selected topics in modern synthetic organic chemistry, drawn from one or more of the following: (1) advanced methodology for organic synthesis, (2) carbohydrate structure and synthesis, (3) organometallic methodology for organic synthesis, and (4) solid-phase organic synthesis and combinatorial chemistry. Other topics appropriate to the category may also be offered. Course may be repeated for credit, provided there is no duplication of specific topic. Prerequisite: CHEM 563 or consent of Instructor. CHEM 669 Special Topics in Bio-organic Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced discussion of selected topics in modern bio-organic chemistry, drawn from one or more of the following: (1) natural products and secondary metabolism, (2) nucleic acid chemistry, and (3) organic and biophysical carbohydrate chemistry. Other topics appropriate to the category may also be offered. Course may be repeated for credit, provided there is no duplication of specific topic. CHEM 681 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Course may be repeated for credit, provided there is no duplication of specific topic.

231.77

Chimie, CHIM Faculté Saint-Jean

Cours de 1er cycle CHIM 101 Introduction à la chimie I Œ3 (fi 6) (premier semestre, 3-1s-3). Structure atomique, liaisons covalentes, thermochimie, équilibre chimique, acides et bases, les éléments représentatifs. Préalable(s): Chimie 30 ou l’équivalent. CHIM 102 Introduction à la chimie II Œ3 (fi 6) (deuxième semestre, 3-1s-3). États de la matière et forces intermoléculaires, solubilité et solutions, électrochimie, thermodynamique chimique, cinétique chimique, liaison et propriétés des métaux de transition. Préalable: CHIM 101. CHIM 103 Introduction à la chimie I Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-1s-3/2). Stoechiométrie, gaz parfaits, thermochimie, équilibre chimique, acides et bases, structure atomique et liaison chimique. Préalable(s): Chimie 30 ou l’équivalent. Note: Ce cours est réservé aux étudiants de génie. CHIM 105 Introduction à la chimie II Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-3/2). Solubilité, cellule électrochimique et équation de Nernst, cinétique chimique, modes de liaison et structure, cinétique chimique, modes de liaison et structure, chimie des éléments de transition. Préalable: CHIM 103. Note: Ce cours est réservé aux étudiants de génie. CHIM 161 Chimie organique I Œ3 (fi 6) (premier semestre, 3-0-3). Étude de la structure moléculaire et de la réactivité des composés organiques basée sur leurs groupes fonctionnels. Introduction à la nomenclature, la structure tridimensionnelle, les propriétés physiques, et réactivité des composés de carbone. L’accent sera mis sur les alcanes, les alcènes, les alcynes, les halogénures d’alkyle, les alcools, et certains composés aromatiques. Les exemples comprendront les hydrocarbures (produits

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pétroliers) composés organiques halogénés (pesticides), et les polymères d’une importance industrielle que l’on retrouve dans la vie de tous les jours. Préalable(s): Chimie 30 ou l’équivalent. Note: Les étudiants ayant des crédits en CHIM 101 et 102 devront normalement suivre CHIM 261. CHIM 211 Analyse quantitative I Œ3 (fi 6) (l’un ou l’autre semestre, 3-0-4). Principes, méthodes et applications expérimentales avec emphase sur les équilibres de phases solubles, la titrimétrie, les compétences en laboratoire, et l’évaluation de données expérimentales. Exemples en analyse organique et inorganique. Préalable(s): CHIM 102 ou SCI 100. CHIM 261 Chimie organique I Œ3 (fi 6) (premier semestre, 3-0-3). Corrélation des structures et des liaisons chimiques des composés de carbone avec les propriétés physiques et la réactivité chimique des molécules organiques. Étude des groupes fonctionnels. L’accent sera mis sur les hydrocarbures et leurs dérivés qui contiennent les hétéroatomes (halogènes, oxygène, souffre, et groupe hydroxy). Introduction à la stéréochimie, la structure tridimensionnelle, les mécanismes, en particulier addition aux doubles liaisons, substitution nucléophile et réactions d’élimination. Préalable(s): CHIM 101 ou 103. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour CHEM 164 ou CHIM 161. CHIM 263 Chimie organique II Œ3 (fi 6) (deuxième semestre, 3-0-3). Continuation de l’étude des propriétés structurales et chimiques des groupes fonctionnels avec l’accent sur les alcynes, les composés aromatiques, les aldéhydes, les cétones, les acides carboxyliques et leurs dérivés, et les amines. Exemples de ces groupes fonctionnels dans les produits naturels; les hydrates de carbone, les amino-acides et les protéines, les acides nucléiques, et les lipides. Étude de la déduction des structures des molécules organiques par spectroscopie infrarouge et spectroscopie de résonance magnétique nucléaire. Préalable(s): CHEM 164 ou CHIM 161 ou 261 ou SCI 100. Note: Ce cours n’est pas accessible aux étudiants ayant ou postulant des crédits pour CHIM 163.

231.78

Chinese, CHINA Department of East Asian Studies Faculty of Arts

Undergraduate Courses Notes (1) The Department reserves the right to place students in the language course appropriate to their level of language skill. (2) Placement tests may be administered in order to assess prior background. Students with an Asian (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) language background should consult a Department advisor. Such students may be granted advanced placement and directed to register in a more advanced course suitable to their level of ability or they may be encouraged to seek “Credit by Special Assessment” (see §44.5) when appropriate. (3) The Department will withhold credit from students completing courses for which prior background is deemed to make them ineligible. For example, 100-level courses are normally restricted to students with little or no prior knowledge in that language. Should a student with matriculation standing, or those possessing prior background (such as native speakers or those for whom it is their first language) register in the 100-level courses, credit may be withheld. O CHINA 101 Basic Chinese I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). A non-intensive introduction to Mandarin Chinese. Note: Not open to students with matriculation in Chinese, i.e., CHINA 30 or equivalent. O CHINA 102 Basic Chinese II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). A continuation of CHINA 101. Prerequisite: CHINA 101. Note: Not open to students with matriculation in Chinese, i.e., CHINA 30 or equivalent. O CHINA 201 Basic Chinese III Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). A continuation of CHINA 102. Designed to develop further basic skills in spoken and written Chinese. Prerequisite: CHINA 102. O CHINA 202 Basic Chinese IV Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 5-0-0). A continuation of CHINA 201. Designed to develop further basic skills in spoken and written Chinese. Prerequisite: CHINA 201. O CHINA 208 Overview of the Chinese Language System Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Discussion of basic features of the Chinese language. Designed to be taken concurrently with CHINA 201 or 202. Taught in English. Note: This course will NOT fulfill the Language other than English requirement of the B.A. degree. Prerequisites: CHINA 102 or consent of the Department.

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C Course Listings

CHEM 614 Advanced Electrochemistry Œ1.5 (fi 3) (second term, 3/2-0-0). Six week course with topics that may include: CV and chemical reactions, microelectrode applications, carbon electrodes, modified electrode surfaces, micro-fabricated sensors, scanning probe microscopy, spectroelectrochemistry, rotating disk electrochemistry, AC voltammetry. Prerequisite: CHEM 514.

603

Course Listings C

604

University of Alberta

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O CHINA 211 Mandarin Chinese I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Designed for speakers proficient in one of the regional dialects of Chinese to gain fluency and literacy in standard Mandarin.

Chinese language. Lectures and discussion in English. Prerequisite: CHINA 302 and 308, or consent of Department. Note: Does not fulfil any Faculty of Arts Language other than English requirement.

O CHINA 212 Mandarin Chinese II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: CHINA 211.

O CHINA 410 Classical Chinese Poetry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Emphasis on the production of poetry as a cultural object. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 342, or consent of Department.

O CHINA 240 Chinese Literature and the Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major forms of literature and art in China and their interrelationships. Taught in English. Prerequisite: EASIA 101 or consent of Department. Note: Does not fulfil any Faculty of Arts Language other than English requirement. O CHINA 301 Intermediate Chinese I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 4-0-0). Continuing study of spoken and written modem standard Chinese. Conversation and composition are integrated with reading and discussion of texts of modem Chinese prose, fiction, and other kinds of writing. Prerequisite: CHINA 202 and 208, or consent of Department. O CHINA 302 Intermediate Chinese II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 4-0-0). A continuation of CHINA 301. Prerequisite: CHINA 301 or consent of Department. O CHINA 308 Introduction to Chinese Linguistics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction of the Chinese sound system, basic sentence structure, writing system, and language change and variation. Taught in English. This course will not fulfill the Language other than English requirement of the BA degree. Prerequisites: LING 101 and CHINA 202 or consent of Department. L CHINA 310 Overview of Chinese Dialects Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Language systems of major Chinese dialects. Taught in English. Note: This course will NOT fulfill the language other than English requirement of the B.A. degree. Prerequisite: CHINA 202 or consent of Department. O CHINA 321 Pre-modern Chinese Literature in English Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Chinese Literature from earliest times through the Qing Dynasty. Readings and lectures in English. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 or consent of Department. Note: Does not fulfil any Faculty of Arts Language other than English requirement. O CHINA 322 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Chinese Literature of the 20th and 21st centuries. Readings and lectures in English. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 or consent of Department. Note: Does not fulfil any Faculty of Arts Language other than English requirement. O CHINA 337 Women in Modern Chinese Literature and Film Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Roles of women as writers/filmmakers and as subjects within literary works and movies. Readings and lectures in English. Note: This course does not fulfill the Language other than English requirement of the BA degree. O CHINA 341 Classical Chinese I Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the syntax and semantic structures of classical Chinese. Prerequisite: CHINA 200 or 202. O CHINA 342 Classical Chinese II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). A continuation of CHINA 341. Prerequisite: CHINA 341. CHINA 351 Culture and Identity in Taiwan Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The relationship between culture and identity in Taiwan through the study of literature and film in translation. Readings and lectures in English. Note: Does not fulfill any Faculty of Arts requirement for a Language other than English. O CHINA 376 Topics in Early and Medieval Chinese Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Readings in translation, with selected original language materials for advanced language students. May be repeated for credit when course content differs. CHINA 401 Advanced Chinese I: Chinese in Mass Media Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Chinese language through contemporary film, television programs and newspapers. Prerequisite: CHINA 302 or consent of Department. CHINA 402 Advanced Chinese II: Literature and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Development of language skills through reading modern fiction and/or non-fiction. Introduction to important issues and themes in modern Chinese society and literature. Readings in Chinese; lectures in English and/or Chinese. Prerequisite: CHINA 401 or consent of Department. CHINA 407 Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Advanced readings from newspapers, magazines, social commentary and/or literary prose. Prerequisite: CHINA 302 or consent of Department. CHINA 408 Chinese Linguistics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Discussion of the major linguistic features of the

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O CHINA 414 Chivalric Tales and Love Stories Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Language and literary conventions in pre-modern vernacular fiction and drama. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 342, or consent of Department. O CHINA 420 Chinese Modernity: Literature and Film Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A cross-disciplinary study of literary and cinematic texts from modern China. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 302, or consent of Department. CHINA 421 Topics in Pre-Modern Chinese Literary History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). The major works of a particular period or aspect of Chinese literature prior to 1900. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 342, or consent of Department. Note: May be repeated for credit when course content differs. O CHINA 425 Post-Mao Fiction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A discussion of the major literary trends and the fictional works of important writers who have emerged in the post-Mao era (since 1976). Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 302, or consent of Department. CHINA 428 Chinese-English Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory and practice in translation as applied to Chinese and English literary and non-literary texts. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 302 or consent of Department. CHINA 438 Practical Translation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The practice of translation in media, government, and business. Prerequisite: CHINA 428 or consent of Department. CHINA 440 Research Methods in Chinese Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Discussion and application of the research methods for Chinese linguistics and pedagogy. Lectures in English. Prerequisite: CHINA 302 and 308, or consent of the Department. Note: Does not fulfil any Faculty of Arts Language other than English requirement. O CHINA 455 Topics in Taiwan Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Readings in Taiwan literature with emphasis on tradition, theme, and technique. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 302, or consent of Department. CHINA 480 Topics in Chinese Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Readings and class discussion will be primarily in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHINA 240 and 302, or consent of Department. Note: May be repeated for credit when course content differs. CHINA 490 Honors Thesis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).

Graduate Courses CHINA 500 Topics in Chinese Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A reading knowledge of Chinese is required. CHINA 501 Methods of Research: Pre-Modern Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Sinology; historical and critical approaches to premodern Chinese literature. A reading knowledge of Chinese is required. CHINA 502 Methods of Research: Modern Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Sinology; historical and critical approaches to modern Chinese literature. A reading knowledge of Chinese is required. CHINA 510 Reading Tang-Song Poetry Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Conventions of writing poetry in China in contrast to those in the western world. CHINA 521 Topics in Pre-modern Chinese Literary History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The major works of a particular period or aspect of Chinese literature prior to 1900. A reading knowledge of Chinese is required. Note: May be repeated for credit when course content differs. CHINA 540 Research Methods in the Chinese Language Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Discussion and application of the research methods for Chinese linguistics and pedagogy. Lectures in English. A reading knowledge of Chinese is required. CHINA 599 Topics in Chinese Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of major topics in Chinese literature, pre-modern and modern. CHINA 599 must be taken at least once and may be repeated for credit when course content differs. A reading knowledge of Chinese is required.

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University of Alberta

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Christian Theology at St Joseph’s College, CHRTC St Joseph’s College



Note: The following courses can be used as Arts options.

Undergraduate Courses O CHRTC 100 The Bible: An Introduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of the basic themes of the Christian bible; creation and covenant; sin and evil; the biblical history of ancient Israel; the prophets and justice; the preaching, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ; redemption; the emergence of the Church. O CHRTC 101 Catholic Studies: An Introduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Selected themes in Western history, thought and culture as they relate to the Catholic Christian intellectual tradition. CHRTC 102 Interdisciplinary Seminar in Catholic Studies II Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 0-3s-0). Critical examination and discussion of selected themes in Western history, thought and culture as they relate to the Catholic Christian intellectual tradition. Prerequisite: CHRTC 101. Note: Restricted to students enrolled in the St Joseph’s College-Faculty of Arts Cohort program. CHRTC 103 Introduction to the Roads of Happiness Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An interdisciplinary introduction to the various ways in which happiness is manifested. CHRTC 203 Topics in the Catholic Tradition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CHRTC 220 Sport and Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Investigating the interaction between sport and religion in Western societies primarily from a Christian perspective. O CHRTC 221 Interactions between Aboriginal Spiritual Traditions and Christianity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). O CHRTC 250 The Theological Education of the Catholic Teacher Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The components that make up the education of the Catholic teacher. Issues include credal statements, the moral and social teachings of the Church, liturgical practices, a general theology and theory of Catholic education. O CHRTC 264 Dimensions of the Christian Faith Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). What is Christianity? An introduction to the major dimensions of Christianity, such as revelation, faith, Scripture, God, Jesus as Lord and Saviour, with reflection on them in light of contemporary human experience. Formerly CHRTC 364. O CHRTC 266 Jesus in the New Testament Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploring the person of Jesus through a study of the four Gospels, Paul, and later New Testament writers. O CHRTC 267 The New Testament Letters: An Introduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A theological and scriptural exploration of the central themes of the New Testament letters and their contemporary relevance. O CHRTC 270 The Catholic Church Today Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A study of how the Catholic Church understands itself today, its relationships with other Christians and with non-Christians, and its role in the contemporary world. Formerly CHRTC 370. O CHRTC 272 Catholic Moral Thought: An Introduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major themes in Catholic moral reflection with application to contemporary issues. The meaning of morality and Christian conversion: the role of experience, the Bible, the Church, moral norms, the development of conscience, and personal responsibility. Not open to students with credit in CHRTC 172. O CHRTC 292 Spirituality for Today’s Christians Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Developing an understanding of the role of prayer, leisure, and work within a Christian lifestyle in the light of Scripture, Christian tradition, current theological reflection, and personal differences. O CHRTC 309 Topics in the Christian Tradition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CHRTC 339 International Service Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Supervised international work experience in selected Christian social agencies. Evaluation based on experience and seminars. Prerequisite: Consent of the College. O CHRTC 341 Contemporary Film and Christian Values Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theological themes arising out of contemporary film. Themes may include relationships, family, gender, possessions, work freedom, violence, suffering, death, happiness, and hope.

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O CHRTC 348 A History of Christianity in Canada Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). O CHRTC 349 Social Justice and Christianity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of particular social justice issues related to the economy, women, native peoples, the environment, etc., in light of Catholic social teachings and other Christian perspectives; social action strategies, and education for social justice. O CHRTC 350 Science and Religion: Christian Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of relationships between science and religion. Topics may include Galileo affair, geology and Noah’s flood, Darwin’s religious beliefs, evolution vs creation debate, intelligent design, natural evil, interpretations of Genesis 1-11. O CHRTC 351 Sex, Love and Marriage: Christian Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Questions of meaning and morality concerning sex, love, marriage, non-marital sex, parenthood, relationship and marriage breakup, celibacy, gender, and homosexuality, considered in the light of experience, the Bible, Catholic teaching, traditional and contemporary theological discussion. O CHRTC 352 Bioethical Issues: Christian Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Reproductive and genetic technologies, abortion, transplantation, resource allocation, research, withdrawing treatment, personal directives, euthanasia, considered in light of human experience. Catholic Church teaching, other Christian perspectives and contemporary ethical discussion. O CHRTC 353 Imaginative Literature: Christian Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The context of the works and their authors, Christian content, and how the works deal with Christian values, beliefs, spirituality and conscience. O CHRTC 354 The Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A comparison of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke to determine their theological and pastoral orientations in proclaiming the Jesus tradition to the developing Christian communities. O CHRTC 355 The Catechism of the Catholic Church: Theological Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Scripture, the moral life, systematic theology, social teachings, catechesis, the spiritual life in the Catechism. The relationship between the Catechism and Catholic theological development. O CHRTC 356 Theologies of Christian Religious Education Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Pluralism, multiculturalism, and ecumenism in relation to Christian religious education including tradition, Scripture, the Church, the person, the mission of the Church in the world, as well as the influence of the wider culture upon the development of theologies of education. O CHRTC 358 The Gospel and Epistles of John Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The authorship, structure and content of the Gospel and Epistles of John, their theological and pastoral orientation and their contribution to early Christianity. O CHRTC 371 The Sacraments Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The role of the sacraments in Christian life and worship. The sacraments as encounters with the divine and as community celebrations. Historical development and current understandings. O CHRTC 372 The Theology and Spirituality of Eastern Christianity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The churches of the Christian East, the Patristic era and early ecumenical councils, the schism between East and West, and contemporary Greek Catholic and Orthodox Churches with special attention to the churches in Canada. O CHRTC 380 Christian Religious Education and the Child Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Key themes relevant to the faith life of children, such as: the presence of God, a sense of belonging, the need for community. Examination of selected Alberta school curriculum topics. O CHRTC 381 Christian Religious Education and the Adolescent/ Young Adult Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Key themes relevant to the faith search of adolescents/young adults, such as: the life and teachings of Jesus, the challenge of the Gospel in our culture, and the meaning of belonging and commitment to Church. Examination of selected Alberta school curriculum topics. O CHRTC 390 Neuroscience, the Person and Christian Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Interdisciplinary study of personhood and related topics: animal/human consciousness; body/soul, mind/brain, sexuality/gender, and relationship issues; religious and mystical experiences. O CHRTC 391 Women’s Spirituality in Contemporary Christianity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Women’s experience of God and the Christian life expressed in the history of spirituality, personal faith development and contemporary culture. O CHRTC 392 Catholicism and Popular Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the relationship between Catholicism

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and popular culture using both historical and contemporary examples. Use by Catholics of such popular media as print, film, video, TV, music and the internet; Catholic assessments of consumer culture and the mass media. O CHRTC 394 Business Ethics: Christian Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A theological study of ethical issues in business settings, dealing with such themes as employer-employee relations, job security, advertising, distribution of wealth, acquisitive individualism, the common good; decisions on ethical issues in light of contemporary Catholic teaching. O CHRTC 396 Environmental Issues: Christian Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theological and ethical issues concerning our relationship to the planet earth: responsible stewardship, non-renewable resources, pollution, the use of technology. O CHRTC 407 Topics in Christian Religious Education Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: CHRTC 380 or 381 or consent of the College. O CHRTC 430 The Human Sexual Body: Theological Perspectives Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Historical and contemporary perspectives on the sexual body in Christian thought. Not to be taken by students with credit in CHRTC 393. O CHRTC 432 Current Theological Issues in Advanced Bioethics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: CHRTC 352 or consent of the College. O CHRTC 449 Field Placement in Christian Service Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-8s-0). Supervised work experience in approved Christian social agencies with seminars and a major paper integrating the theological literature with issues raised by social action and placement experiences. Prerequisite: CHRTC 349 or consent of the College. O CHRTC 450 Directed Readings in Catholic Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). An intensive directed readings course on a topic selected by the student in consultation with one of the faculty. A major term paper is required. Prerequisites: One course in Christian theology and permission of the College. O CHRTC 451 Modern Creationisms Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Critical analysis of the creation-evolution debate in light of scientific evidence and modern biblical scholarship. Prerequisite: CHRTC 350 or consent of the College.

Graduate Courses O CHRTC 501 Directed Reading in Catholic Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of College.

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O CHRTP 313 Topics in Applied Christian Ethics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Exploration and analysis of selected issues in social ethics within the context of theological reflection and commitment. Particular attention will be paid to the development of debate within the Protestant tradition. O CHRTP 315 Pop Culture and Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Considering theological themes in movies, poetry, fiction, and graphic novels that echo lived experiences. O CHRTP 316 Sexual Ethics in a Multi-Faith Context Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 2-1s-0). Deepen awareness of personal, social, cultural, and spiritual dimensions of sexuality. Explored in light of feminist, queer, traditional and contemporary theological thought. O CHRTP 318 Feminist Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 1-2s-0). An examination of feminist criticisms of selected doctrines and practices. O CHRTP 319 Eco-Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Earth’s divinity is infinitely precious and endangered. Participants will reflect theologically on this great challenge of the 21st century, and discover paths by which we can “stay awake” to the call of earth. O CHRTP 320 Classroom Storytelling: The Sacred in Contemporary Children’s Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Participants will investigate the use of contemporary children’s literature as a supportive, pedagogical strategy in the development of children’s spirituality. O CHRTP 321 Art Therapy Fundamentals Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-2s-0). Art therapy, a specialized field in counseling psychology, provides a natural vehicle for promoting integrative, holistic approach to psychological healing. Explores the theory and application of art therapy to spirituality and healing settings. This course will be experientially based, with a lecture and seminar portion. O CHRTP 381 Introduction to Music Therapy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-2s-0). Introduction to the discipline of music therapy: physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual applications of music. O CHRTP 382 Introduction to Drama Therapy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-2s-0). Explores the role of drama therapy in health and spirituality: masks, puppets, theatre games, improvisation, role-play, playback theatre, and psychodrama in various therapeutic settings. O CHRTP 383 Psychotherapy and Spirituality: An Introduction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-2s-0). Explores the theory and practice of psychotherapy, pastoral counseling, and spiritual care: therapeutic work, current theory, personal reflection, and group process.

O CHRTC 609 Topics in Christian Tradition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0).

O CHRTP 400 Special Topics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-2s-0). Discussion of topics relevant to the theological or pastoral counselling disciplines. Credit may be obtained for this course more than once.

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O CHRTP 411 Independent Study in Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 0-3s-0). Directed reading or research in a chosen area of theology.

Christian Theology at St Stephen’s College, CHRTP St Stephen’s College



Note: The following courses can be used as Arts options.

Undergraduate Courses O CHRTP 117 New Issues in Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Developments and controversies in contemporary theology and their implications for faith and practice. Not open to students with credit in CHRTP 317. O CHRTP 301 Hebrew Scriptures Basics Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Explores basic themes and literature of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament): sources and context, authorship, literary qualities, general teaching and formation. O CHRTP 305 Scripture as Story Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Explores how the elements of story employed by the Gospel writers and editors shaped their understanding of the person of Jesus and his followers. O CHRTP 311 Theology and the Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Explores how the Sacred is experienced and expressed through the visual arts, music and dance. O CHRTP 312 Questing Faith: Thinking About God Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Explores major questions of faith: God, Christ, humanity, evil, hope. This course provides insight into the Christian faith for all interested persons.

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Graduate Courses O CHRTP 511 Independent Study in Theology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 0-3s-0). Directed reading or research in a chosen area of theology. O CHRTP 521 Art Therapy: The Artful-Spiritual Connection Œ3 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 1-2s-0). History and ethics of art therapy, incorporating introductory art therapy techniques and theological reflection. O CHRTP 522 Child and Adolescent Art Therapy Œ3 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 1-2s-0). Philosophy and methodology related to development, assessment and therapeutic interventions. Cultural sensitivity is addressed. O CHRTP 523 Jungian Psychology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-0-0). Psychotherapeutic process and spirituality is explored in the context of Jungian analytic thought. O CHRTP 553 Metaphor in the Arts and Spirituality Œ3 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-0-0). O CHRTP 771 Inquiry, Evaluation and Search for Knowledge Œ3 (fi 6) (either term or Spring/Summer, 3-0-0). Considering the basic elements of knowledge generation through the insights of theology and spirituality.

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Civil Engineering, CIV E Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Faculty of Engineering http://www.beartracks.ualberta.ca

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University of Alberta

CIV E 221 Environmental Engineering Fundamentals Œ3.8 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-3/2). Basic mechanisms of chemistry, biology, and physics relevant to environmental engineering processes. Principles of equilibrium reactions and kinetics, mass transfer and material balances, microbial growth and kinetics, water, energy, and nutrient cycles. Applications to environmental engineering systems as biological degradation, mass and energy movement through the environment, and design of water and wastewater treatment systems. Prerequisites: CHEM 103 and CHEM 105. CIV E 240 Technical Communications Œ2 (fi 8) (second term, 1-2s-0). Written and oral communications in civil engineering; lectures and practice on presentation of oral and written reports, including technical proposals; progress reports; field inspection reports; consulting reports; and coverage of elements of ethics, equity, concepts of sustainable development and environmental stewardship, public and worker safety and health considerations including the context of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Act. Seminars and practice in developing effective search strategies for technical information. A written report must be submitted by each student. CIV E 250 Plane Surveying Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3). Basic surveying concepts and instrumentation, measurement errors, coordinate systems, leveling, traversing, layout surveys, earthwork volumes, conventional, and digital mapping, GIS concepts, aerial photography, and GPS. Prerequisites: MATH 101 and 102. CIV E 251 Survey School Œ1.5 (fi 4) (second term or Spring/Summer, 1 week). Practical exercises in field methods; project type of assignments; field astronomy; electronic distance measuring instruments. Note: Survey School is held off campus. Prerequisite: CIV E 250. CIV E 265 Engineering Drawing and Computer Graphics Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 2-0-3). Multiview representation, pictorial views of threedimensional objects. Computer-aided graphics using AutoCAD. CIV E 270 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies I Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3). Plane stress and strain; stress-strain relationships; stresses and deformations resulting from axial and transverse loads; buckling of columns; torsion of circular sections; combined stress; statically indeterminate problems. Laboratory to demonstrate mechanical properties and verify assumptions of analysis. Prerequisites: ENGG 130 and MATH 101. CIV E 290 Civil Engineering Analysis I Œ3 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-0). Statistical and probabilistic approaches to civil engineering problems. Prerequisite: MATH 101. CIV E 295 Civil Engineering Analysis II Œ4 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-2). Application of numerical methods to civil engineering problems. Prerequisites: ENCMP 100 and MATH 102. CIV E 303 Project Management Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Planning and scheduling; theories and techniques of project management. CIV E 315 Transportation Engineering Œ4 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-2). Transportation systems and their elements. Principles of transportation planning. Traffic volume, capacity, speed, density, and safety. Fundamentals of traffic control. Principles of highway planning. Highway and terrain. Vehicular motion. Horizontal and vertical geometric design. Cost/benefit analysis in highway design. Earthwork and mass diagram. Flexible and rigid pavement design. Prerequisite: CIV E 250. CIV E 321 Principles of Environmental Modeling and Risk Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Introduction modeling environmental processes to predict the movement of water and fate of contaminants in the hydrologic cycle. Principles of mass transfer, conservation of mass, environmental transformations, nutrient enrichment and depletion are developed. Introduction to storm events, rainfall, runoff, stream discharge and stormwater management. Applications of modeling results to the quantification of risk using examples from hydrology, water pollution and health protection and development of environmental regulations. Prerequisite: CIV E 221. Corequisite: CIV E 330. CIV E 330 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-1s-0). Fluid properties; dimensional analysis; hydrostatics; fundamental equations of fluid motion; laminar, turbulent and inviscid flows; boundary layers and flow around immersed bodies; elementary building aerodynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 209. Corequisite: MATH 201. CIV E 331 Applied Hydraulics Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Introduction to applied hydraulics; control volume methods, open channel hydraulics, pipe systems, pumps, distribution and collection system hydraulics and design. Prerequisite: CIV E 330. Corequisite: either CIV E 221 or ENV E 222. CIV E 372 Structural Analysis I Œ4 (fi 8) (either term, 3-2s-0). Introduction to structural loads; deformations

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of statically determinate beams, trusses and frames; influence lines; analysis of statically indeterminate structures by consistent deformations, slope deflection and moment distribution; direct stiffness analysis. Prerequisite: CIV E 270. CIV E 374 Structural Design I Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to limit states design. Behavior and design of steel and reinforced concrete members. Prerequisite: CIV E 372. CIV E 381 Soil Mechanics Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3). Compaction; site investigation; theories of water seepage; effective stress principles; settlement; strength and mechanical properties; introduction to retaining structures, foundation, and slope stability. Prerequisite: EAS 210. CIV E 391 Civil Engineering Materials Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3). Classification of soils. Properties of Portland cement concrete related to micro- and macro-structure and constituent materials. Properties of bituminous materials and design of bituminous mixes. Prerequisite: MAT E 202 or ENV E 220. CIV E 395 Civil Engineering Analysis III Œ3.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-2/2). The formulation of partial differential equations for modeling civil engineering problems. Introduction to analytical and numerical solution techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 201, MATH 209 and CIV E 295. CIV E 398 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics Œ3.5 (fi 8) (first term, 3-1s-0). Stress, strain and displacements in two and three dimensions. Constitutive equations. Governing equations of elasticity and simple solutions. Strain energy and virtual work. Theories of failure. Prerequisites: CIV E 270 and MATH 209. CIV E 406 Construction Estimating, Planning, and Control Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Introduction to elements of construction, planning, scheduling, and cost estimating. Familiarization with quantity take-off, estimate preparation, cost recovery, resource allocation, project scheduling, risk analysis, and bid preparation. Prerequisite: CIV E 303. CIV E 409 Construction Methods Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3). Principles of building, heavy and bridge construction; wood and formwork design, stability during construction, economics of equipment selection, movement of material on construction sites, safety, and constructability issues. Students work in teams on a design project. Prerequisites: CIV E 303 and 372. Note: Restricted to fourth-year traditional and fifth-year co-op engineering students, or by consent of the Department. CIV E 411 Transportation Engineering II Œ3.8 (fi 8) (first term, 3-0-3/2). Traffic operations and network analysis, traffic stream flow and roadway analysis, weaving and interchange ramp analysis, intersection traffic control measures and control design, progressive signal system design, traffic flow prediction, road network simulation and assignment algorithms, motor vehicle accident analysis; and field data collection method. Prerequisite: CIV E 315. CIV E 419 Transportation Engineering: Highway Planning and Design Œ4.5 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-3). Planning and design of highway transportation systems, including development, planning process, data collection, procedures for future developments, evaluation of transportation plans, and design of highway transportation facilities. Students work in teams on a design project. Prerequisite: CIV E 411. Note: Restricted to fourth-year traditional and fifth-year co-op engineering students. CIV E 429 Environmental Engineering Design Œ4.5 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-3). Fundamentals of municipal planning and design of water supply, water and wastewater treatment, storm water management, or wastewater collection and management systems. Course includes design projects, field trips, and presentations. Students work in teams on a design project. Prerequisites: CIV E 321 and ENV E 421. Note: Restricted to fourth-year traditional and fifth-year co-op engineering students. CIV E 431 Water Resources Engineering Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Hydrotechnical analysis, including: advanced open channel hydraulics; advanced surface water hydrology; groundwater and well hydraulics; and environmental hydraulics. Prerequisites: CIV E 321, 331. CIV E 439 Water Resources Engineering Design Œ4.5 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-3). Design of hydraulic structures and river engineering works, including: dams, spillways, energy dissipators, bridges, culverts, erosion protection and river training works. Students work in teams on a design project. Prerequisite: CIV E 431. Note: Restricted to fourth-year traditional and fifth-year co-op engineering students. CIV E 459 Biomedical Engineering Design Œ4.5 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-3). Application of civil and mechanical engineering principles to different topics in biomechanical engineering design. Topics may include: experimental tissues, bone engineering, computational biomechanics, numerical modeling for different mechanical and biological processes. Students work in teams on a design project. Note: Restricted to fourth-year traditional and fifth-year co-op engineering students.

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Undergraduate Courses

607

Course Listings C

608

University of Alberta

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CIV E 474 Structural Design II Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Behavior and design of steel and reinforced concrete structures. This course builds on the material presented in CIV E 374 and places greater emphasis on the behavior of overall structures. Prerequisite: CIV E 374.

CIV E 607 Work Improvement Studies Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Planning for productivity improvement, work measurement technique, data analysis and evaluation, human behavior as a factor in construction productivity, safety in productivity improvement, computer and other tools for productivity improvement.

CIV E 479 Structural Design III Œ4.5 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-3). Design of prestressed concrete structures; masonry and reinforced masonry elements; timber structures; fatigue life of steel structures and cold formed steel elements. Students work in teams on a design project. Prerequisite: CIV E 474. Note: Restricted to fourth-year traditional and fifth-year co-op engineering students.

CIV E 608 Construction Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to the elements and methods of construction and principles of material handling on construction projects. Winter construction, dewatering, earthmoving and earthworks, concrete processes, building systems and lifting.

CIV E 481 Soil Engineering Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Site investigation; strength of soils; geosynthetics for soil improvement; design of excavations and earth pressures on retaining structures; stability of natural slopes and their improvement; design of cuts and embankments; foundation design, stability and settlement; pile foundations; frost action and permafrost. Prerequisite: CIV E 381. CIV E 489 Geotechnical Design Œ4.5 (fi 8) (second term, 3-0-3). Evaluation of site conditions. Design and analysis of shallow and deep foundations and retaining structures. Slope stability of embankments and cuts including foundation excavations. Students work in teams on a design project. Prerequisite: CIV E 481. Note: Restricted to fourth-year traditional and fifth-year co-op engineering students. CIV E 499 Special Topics in Civil Engineering Design Œ4.5 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3).

Graduate Courses CIV E 524 Environmental Biotechnology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Use of microbial systems for bioremediation and energy production; study microorganisms as environmental contaminants. Study microbiological concepts and practices particularly related to environmental engineering and science. Discussion of new technologies and genomic approaches that can be applied to enhance efficiency and productivity of biological processes and solve environmental problems. Prerequisite: ENV E 324 or consent of instructor. CIV E 526 Soil Remediation Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Identification of regulations and guidelines applicable to contaminated site assessment and remediation. Review of soil and contaminant properties that affect contaminant partitioning and movement in subsurface soils. Study of physical, chemical and biological treatment methods for the remediation of contaminated soils. CIV E 558 Air Quality Assessment Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Overview of air quality regulations. Sources of air pollutants, air quality meteorology, and air quality modeling. General principles of air pollutants sampling and its application to particle and gas sampling. Corequisite: ENV E 323 or ENV E 423. CIV E 601 Project Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Overview of project management for capital construction projects. Emphasis on planning and scheduling, including linear scheduling, project control, value engineering, and constructability. CIV E 602 Contract Administration Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Construction project and contract administration; budgeting, costing and financial project control; delivery systems; labour relations; safety. CIV E 603 Construction Informatics Œ4.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Computer-aided information management in construction, including relational database development and management, application of data mining techniques, computer programming, and application of computers in the planning, organization and control of construction projects. CIV E 604 Construction Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Covers fundamentals of construction law; overview of the Canadian Legal System, business organization. Tort liability, construction contracts, agreements. Lien legislation, statutes governing the engineering profession and other legal topics.

CIV E 609 Underground Trenchless Construction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to underground pipeline infrastructure. Focus on pipeline condition assessment. New construction such as horizontal directional drilling, pilot tube microtunneling, pipe bursting, and pipe jacking. Rehabilitation methods such as cured in place pipe lining, geotechnical consideration. Risk considerations for underground projects. CIV E 612 Transportation Planning: Methodology and Techniques Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction and overview of transportation planning. Institutional framework of transportation planning. Characteristics of urban travel, trip generation, trip distribution, mode choice, trip assignment, urban activity system. Transportation supply, transportation system impact analysis, evaluation process and methods. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. CIV E 613 Transportation Systems and Demand Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Microeconomic principles of production and consumer behaviour. Econometric modeling of demand: parameter estimation techniques, disaggregate choice theory, sampling and data preparation, evaluation. Networks, economic evaluations. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. CIV E 614 Traffic Operation and Control Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Human factors, traffic control devices, signal warrants, principles of signalized intersections, signal timing, signal optimization and coordination, capacity, traffic delay, left turn, diamond interchange, unsignalized intersection, roundabouts, actuated control, incident management, freeway control. CIV E 615 Traffic Flow and Network Modeling Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Traffic flow stream characteristics, car following model, continuum flow model, fundamental diagram, microscopic traffic simulation, macroscopic traffic flow modeling, model parameter calibration, route choice concept and model, static traffic network modeling, dynamic traffic network modeling. CIV E 616 Traffic Safety Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Introduction to traffic safety. Focus on collisions and exposure. Safety management process. Collision modeling, theory and applications. Safety evaluation techniques, challenges, opportunities, influence of confounding factors and regression to the mean bias. CIV E 618 Pavement Management Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to pavement management, network and project level management, data collection and management, pavement evaluation, pavement design, rehabilitation and maintenance, pavement performance models, life cycle analysis, implementation of pavement management systems, future directions and research needs. CIV E 620 Environmental Engineering Measurements I Œ4.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Theory and procedures for determining the quality of natural water, potable water, municipal and industrial wastes. Fundamental parameters and concepts for environmental quality evaluation. CIV E 622 Physical/Chemical Water and Wastewater Treatment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory and design of chemical and physical unit processes utilized in the treatment of water and wastewater, sedimentation, flotation, coagulation, precipitation, filtration, disinfection, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, adsorption, and gas transfer. CIV E 623 Industrial Water and Wastewater Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Industrial water quantity and quality requirements. Characteristics of wastes, inplant controls, product recovery; effluent characteristics, chemical and toxic properties, pretreatment and treatment design theory and methodology, water reclamation and reuse regulations.

CIV E 605 Decision Support Systems in Construction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Modeling construction related problems utilizing mathematical and optimization algorithms. Decision analysis, multi-criteria decision making tools including analytic hierarchy process, multi-attribute utility theory, goal programming and multi-objective optimization forecasting, and queuing theory.

CIV E 624 Biological Waste Treatment Processes Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of the theoretical and applied aspects of wastewater treatment by activated sludge, fixed and moving biological films, conventional and aerated lagoons, sludge digestion, septic tanks, land treatment, and nutrient removal. Guidelines, regulations and economics. System analysis and design of facilities.

CIV E 606 Design and Analysis of Construction Operations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Overview of production management in construction. Techniques for modeling construction operations, design of efficient processes, measurement and improvement of productivity. Computer simulation techniques for modeling and analysis.

CIV E 625 Engineering Management of Water Quality Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Concepts, rationale, theory, institutions and engineering aspects of water quality management. Methods of water quality management; oxygen; chemical and microbial models, natural and induced re-aeration techniques; thermal pollution and ice cover considerations.

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CIV E 628 Municipal Solid Waste Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Principles of municipal waste management to protect public health, municipal waste streams, waste stream analysis and prediction. Refuse collection, storage and hauling methods, and facilities. Engineering design and operation of solid waste processing, treatment and disposal methods: resource recovery, recycling programs, incineration, composting, landfilling, and novel techniques. Solid waste legislation and policies. Environment impacts, impact management and facility siting of waste facilities. CIV E 629 Artificial Neural Network Applications in Environmental Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Modeling of non-linear systems with specific applications of Artificial Neural Network modeling to describe the behaviour of complex environmental systems. Applications may include full-scale water treatment systems; full-scale wastewater treatment systems; atmospheric and indoor air quality; river and lake system water quality; and urban and rural surface runoff quantity and quality. CIV E 631 Engineering Fluid Mechanics Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Navier-Stokes equations and viscous flow. Turbulence and Reynolds equations. Potential flow. Boundary layers. Flow around bodies. Jets and wakes. Related Lab experiments. CIV E 632 Hydraulic Structures Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Hydraulic design of water-handling structures used for extraction, retention, conveyance, control, regulation, energy dissipation, drainage, navigation, flood controls and other civil engineering schemes. Related Lab experiments. CIV E 634 Numerical Methods in Hydraulics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Review of numerical methods for solution of linear and nonlinear systems of algebraic and ordinary differential equations. Finite difference, finite volume and finite element methods for partial differential equations with an emphasis on convection dominated transport equation problems. Stability and accuracy analysis of numerical methods. CIV E 635 Advanced Environmental Fluid Mechanics Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Mixing processes and pollutant transport in rivers, lakes, estuaries, coastal waters, and the atmosphere. Prerequisite: CIV E 631. Related Lab experiments. CIV E 636 Ice Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Elementary heat transfer analysis. Ice formation processes. Ice hydraulics. Ice mechanics. Interaction of ice and engineering structures. CIV E 638 Experimental Fluid Mechanics Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Methods used for the measurement and analysis of data in fluid mechanics experiments. Topics covered will include: dimensional analysis and similitude; digital data acquisition, digital signal processing, spectral analysis, error analysis, surface wave height and slope measurements; laser-Doppler velocimetry, acoustic-Doppler velocimetry, particle-image velocimetry, high speed video and flow visualization. CIV E 639 Computational Hydraulics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Application of computational methods to problems in Hydraulic Engineering, including: transient pipe and open channel flow, two-dimensional shallow water flow, and contaminant and sediment transport. Introduction to computational fluid dynamics. Recommended Prerequisite: CIV E 634 or consent of the instructor. CIV E 640 River Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Flow and sediment transport in alluvial channels; engineering geomorphology; river ecology; design of river engineering installations. CIV E 641 Advanced Surface Water Hydrology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration. Streamflow and hydrograph analysis. Hydrologic systems. Hydrologic routing. Simulation models. Statistical methods. CIV E 645 Water Resources Planning and Management Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Systems concept on the planning and management of water resources systems. Engineering economics and economic theories. Evaluate and optimize the design and operations of water resources systems using Linear Programming, chance-constrained Linear Programming, Dynamic Programming, Stochastic Dynamic Programming, constrained and unconstrained nonlinear programming. Optimal sizing and operations of reservoir systems and hydropower using HEC5 and urban stormwater management system.

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CIV E 646 Modelling Water Quantity and Quality Using Satellite Data and GIS Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Electromagnetic theory and practices of remote sensing and GIS for mapping/modeling the water quantity and quality of the earth’s environment; digital image analysis of satellite data in the visible, NIR, IR and microwave bands, raster and vector GIS, and example applications in water quality, surface soil moisture, snow hydrology and hydrologic modeling. CIV E 653 Readings in Project Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Management of construction projects: organizational issues, advanced time management, total quality management, materials management, change control and management of change. CIV E 654 Artificial Intelligence and Automation in Construction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prototyping techniques applied to the design and development of systems based on artificial intelligence techniques for use in construction. CIV E 656 Environmental Engineering Assessment and Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Review of EIA basics: definitions, cause-effect mechanisms, description of engineered activities and baselines, environmental impact predications, testing and monitoring of effects, project evaluation and decision making for engineering design, and impact management of engineered facilities. Environmental management plans and audits, communication with stakeholders, and review of projects. Prerequisites: CIV E 620 and 622. CIV E 657 Air Pollution Control Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Overview of air quality regulations. Overview of fundamental principles in air quality engineering. Theory and application of processes for gaseous and particulate pollutants control, including incineration, adsorption, absorption, biofiltration, cyclonic separation, electrostatic precipitation, filtration, and scrubbing. Special applications may include the control of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and mobile/automotive emissions. CIV E 658 Design of Civil Engineering Experiments Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to experimental design; design of experiments in environmental, transportation, and other civil engineering specialty areas; analysis of experimental and survey data. CIV E 660 Advanced Structural Analysis Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Direct stiffness theory and modeling of three dimensional framed structures. Linear and nonlinear stability concepts. Approximate and Direct stiffness formulation of geometric nonlinear problems. CIV E 661 Dynamics of Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Dynamics of single and multiple degree of freedom systems. Time step methods. Modal and response spectrum analysis for earthquake loading. Random vibration analysis. Dynamic wind loading analysis. Dynamics of foundations. CIV E 664 Introduction to Solid Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Formulation of basic equations of elasticity in solid mechanics. Cartesian tensor notation. Variational principles. CIV E 665 Introduction to the Finite Element Method Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Fundamentals of the formulation and application of the finite element method to problems of continuum mechanics, with special reference to civil engineering, including problems in solid mechanics and soil mechanics. Prerequisite: CIV E 664 or consent of Instructor. CIV E 666 Structural Concepts Œ4 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-1). Causes and characteristics of loads on buildings, bridges and other structures. Reasons for and calculations of load and resistance factors. CIV E 669 Fracture and Fatigue of Civil Engineering Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to fracture mechanics of steel structures, concepts of brittle and ductile fracture, design approach to prevent brittle fracture. Application of fracture mechanics to fatigue, crack initiation and crack propagation prediction, design of civil engineering structures for fatigue under constant and variable amplitude loading. Design and fabrication considerations to minimize risks of brittle fracture and control fatigue resistance, fracture control plans and crack detection. CIV E 670 Behavior and Design of Steel Members Œ4 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-1). Material properties and plate-buckling problems. Behavior and design of steel tension and compression members, beams and beamcolumns. Behavior and design of welded and bolted connections. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the individual members which form the steel structure. CIV E 671 Behavior and Design of Steel Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Brittle fracture and fatigue problems. Behavior and design of composite beams and plate girders. Discussion of frame behavior; overall buckling and instability concepts as related to the design of columns and bracing systems. This course is designed to build on the material contained in CIV E 670 and to give the student an insight into the behavior of the total structure.

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C Course Listings

CIV E 627 Environmental Engineering Measurements II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-4). Laboratory experiments to present techniques for obtaining data and relationships needed for design of treatment facilities. Introduction to experimental design principles and their application. Statistical analysis of experimental data for data interpretation, presentation and design.

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CIV E 672 Behavior and Design of Concrete Members Œ4 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-1). Strength and behavior of simple reinforced concrete members. Relation between results of research and current design specifications. Material properties. Members subjected to flexure, axial compression, combined flexure and axial load, combined flexure and shear, torsion. CIV E 673 Behavior and Design of Concrete Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Strength and behavior of statically indeterminate reinforced concrete structures. Elastic and limit analysis and design considerations for continuous slab systems, frames and shear walls. CIV E 674 Behavior and Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). (Offered alternate years.) Principles and methods of prestressing. Service load design and analysis. Behavior and strength design. Losses in prestress and anchorage zone stresses. Continuous beams and slabs. Discussion of design specifications. CIV E 676 Behavior and Design of Masonry Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). (Offered alternate years.) Historical developments. Masonry units, mortars and grouts. Behavior, strength and stability of masonry under axial compression. Reinforced masonry in bending and combined axial load and bending. Ductility and joint control. Design application including discussion of code requirements. CIV E 677 Behavior and Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). General design considerations, cold forming effects, effective width method, behavior and design of tension members, beam-columns, and connections. Behavior and design of light gage steel diaphragms, composite steel decks, and industrial steel building design. CIV E 678 Behaviour and Design of Steel Seismic Force Resisting Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). General earthquake engineering concepts and associated requirements of the National Building Code of Canada. Pushover analysis of steel frames. Capacity design philosophy. Seismic behaviour and design of moment-resisting frames, concentrically and eccentrically braced frames, and steel plate shear walls. CIV E 679 Design of Highway Bridges Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Design of highway bridges according to the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code. The course covers topics such as: aesthetic considerations, loading, analysis for moving loads, stability under moving loads, design of steel plate girders and box girders, design for brittle fracture and fatigue, design of prestressed concrete girders, and design of the substructure. CIV E 680 Engineering Properties of Soils Œ4 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-1). Principle of effective stress, clay-water systems, soil compressibility and theories of consolidation. Pore pressure parameters. Strength of granular and cohesive media. Anisotropy of soils. Laboratory measurement of strength and deformation properties. Stress-strain relations. CIV E 681 Seepage and Drainage Œ4 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-1). Elements of hydrogeology; regional groundwater flow, borehole logging methods. Theory of groundwater flow through soils and rocks, permeability, Darcy’s law, field governing equations and their solution by approximate methods, finite difference and finite element methods, unsaturated flow. Civil engineering applications, seepage in earth structures, design of dewatering systems for excavations and slopes, field testing, grouting. CIV E 682 Environmental Geotechnics Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Environmental laws and regulatory processes; geotechnical characterization for environmental problems; transfer processes; elements of groundwater contaminants, geotechnical aspects of waste management; mine waste; dumps and tailings dams; design of landfills; in-situ characterization; site remediations; geotechnical aspects of nuclear waste storage. CIV E 683 Site Investigation Practice Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Techniques of site investigation for geotechnical engineering, in situ testing, instrumentation for field performance studies, case histories covering both rock and soil applications. CIV E 684 Engineering Geology and Terrain Analysis Œ4 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-1). Information sources in engineering geology and terrain analysis, elements of the geology of sediments and glacial geology. Glacial and periglacial land forms. Photogeology and airphoto interpretation applied to geotechnical engineering. Case histories based on specific materials and regional problems. CIV E 685 Applied Environmental Geochemistry Œ4.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Geochemical processes in groundwater and mineral-water-atmosphere interaction related to petroleum, mining and agricultural wastes. Develop concepts in thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry, carbonate and nitrogen chemistry, sorption and exchange reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions and iron-sulphur geochemistry. Computation methods in geochemical modeling (PHREEQC), speciation prediction, reaction path modeling, groundwater mixing and reactive transport analysis. Techniques in environmental soil, groundwater, surface water sampling and field screening methods. Introduction to analytical

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testing methods for organic and inorganic chemicals and the assessment and interpretation of analytical testing results. Prerequisites: University level basic chemistry course, introductory computer course and introductory geology/ mineralogy course. CIV E 687 Rock Engineering for Near Surface Structures Œ3 (fi 6) (second term, 3-0-0). Deterministic and probabilistic design methods for rock slopes and foundations on rocks. Economic, operational and geological factors affecting design. Support and stabilization techniques, excavation methods, monitoring structures in and on rock, foundations for dams and for large loads. CIV E 690 Advanced Foundation Engineering Œ4 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-1). Theories of lateral pressures. Limit equilibrium methods, elasticity methods, semi-empirical methods. Soil anchors. Design of retaining walls and strutted excavations. Bearing capacity of shallow and deep foundations. Allowable settlement of structures. Analysis of settlement of shallow and deep foundations. Behavior of pile groups. Design problems in foundation engineering. CIV E 692 Tunnelling Œ3.5 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-0). Methods of tunnelling, including excavation methods and support techniques, ground response, in situ and induced stress field, displacement field around deep and near surface tunnels, ground-support interaction, design criteria for tunnels in soil and rock, shaft design, site investigation practice and monitoring of tunnels. CIV E 694 Permafrost Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Implications for northern development, extent, engineering classification, thermal regime, ground ice, genesis, site investigations, heat conduction in the ground, properties of frozen soil, thaw consolidation, freezing mechanisms, foundations in frozen ground; slope stability, highways and airfields, pipelines and earth dams in arctic and sub-arctic regions. Prerequisite: CIV E 481 or consent of Department. CIV E 695 Soil Structures Œ4 (fi 6) (second term, 3-1s-1). Stresses in slopes. Limit equilibrium methods of analysis. Landslides in soil. Design of earth dams and embankments. Case histories of earth and rockfill dams. Dam foundations. Soft ground tunnelling. CIV E 697 Rock Engineering Œ4 (fi 6) (first term, 3-1s-1). Elements of structural geology, analysis of the geometry of rock defects, properties of intact rocks. Properties of rock masses and stresses in rock masses, stability of rock slopes. Rock foundations and underground excavations in rock. Case studies. CIV E 698 Petroleum Geomechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Application geotechnical engineering principles to petroleum engineering problems. Principles of thermo-poroelasticity are reviewed. Borehole stability, hydraulic fracturing, subsidence/heave, sand production, formation damage and reservoir-geomechanical modelling are the major topics for the course. Special attention is given to geomechanical influences on reservoir flow processes. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. CIV E 699 Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Techniques and procedures in geotechnical analysis. Geotechnical analysis using commercial computer packages. Nonlinear (material and geometric) finite element methods, advanced constitutive modeling for geotechnical materials, mixed, hybrid and weighted residual formulations, coupled flow/deformation finite element formulation, finite difference and boundary element methods. Other special topics include fracture/shear bank modeling, rock joint modeling and discrete element modeling. Prerequisite: CIV E 664 and CIV E 665 or permission of Instructor. CIV E 709 Advanced Topics in Construction Engineering and Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CIV E 719 Advanced Topics in Transportation and Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisites: permission of Department or Instructor. In this course various advanced topics on transportation engineering and planning will be taught. Some possible advanced topics are: advanced probability theory, traffic safety, travel survey method, ITS technology, advanced network analysis, travel behaviour analysis, integrated land use and transportation modelling, public transportation planning and designing, freight transportation, transportation logistics and operation research. New topics may be added later by the Instructors. CIV E 728 Water and Wastewater Treatment Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Theory, design and application of new or alternative processes for treatment of water and wastewater, including ozone, chlorine dioxide, ultraviolet radiation, advanced oxidation, membrane and others. CIV E 729 Advanced Topics in Environmental Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CIV E 739 Advanced Topics in Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).

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CIV E 779 Advanced Topics in Structural Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CIV E 799 Advanced Topics in Soil Mechanics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).

CLASS 282 Introductory Roman History I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). From the foundation of the city to the fall of the Republic. Not open to students with credit in CLASS 281, 365 or 366. CLASS 283 Introductory Roman History II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The Roman Empire to the late fifth century. Not open to students with credit in CLASS 281, 378 or 379.

CIV E 900 Directed Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned). An engineering project for students registered in a Masters of Engineering program.

L CLASS 294 Ancient Science, Technology, and Medicine Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the development of science, technology, and medicine in the ancient world with particular reference to the civilizations of Greece and Rome.

CIV E 910 Directed Research Œ6 (fi 12) (variable, unassigned). An engineering project for students registered in the joint MBA/MEng program.

CLASS 299 Topics in the Ancient World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).

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Classics, CLASS Department of History and Classics Faculty of Arts

Notes (1) None of the courses under this heading will fulfil the language other than English requirements for the Faculty of Arts. (2) Courses under this heading from 100-400 level may be taken by students with no knowledge of Greek or Latin. Knowledge of Greek or Latin may be required at the 500-level. (3) The 100-level courses provide the broadest introduction to Classics, while the 200-level courses are overviews of specific areas within Classics. The 300-level courses build upon the 200-level courses and have suitable prerequisites. Note: Some 300-level courses do not have a specific topic and the details of the topic to be offered in any given year can be obtained from the Department. (4) All 400-level courses under this heading have a prerequisite of at least one senior level Classics, Greek, or Latin course. (5) The courses numbered 460 through the 500-level are designed for Classics majors, honors, and graduate students. Because precise topics in any given course may vary from year to year, students’ interests are taken into account. For additional related courses see Greek (GREEK) and Latin (LATIN) listings.

Undergraduate Courses O CLASS 102 Greek and Roman Mythology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of classical mythology with readings in translation from various ancient authors as well as from modern scholarly works. CLASS 103 Introduction to Ancient Greece Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Formerly CLASS 270. CLASS 104 Introduction to Ancient Rome Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Formerly CLASS 271. O CLASS 110 The Ancient World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). World history from the beginning of written records to the sixth century AD. The ancient history of the Mediterranean world, with particular emphasis on Egypt, Greece and Rome and compares developments in civilization in these areas with those in Persia, India and China. CLASS 220 Introduction to the Methodology, Theory and Practice of Classical Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). L CLASS 221 Literature of Greece and Rome Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introductory survey in English translation of major works from Greek and Latin literature. This will include epic, lyric, and drama. May not be taken concurrently with or subsequent to CLASS 321/322. CLASS 254 Introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the art, artifacts, and monuments of the Ancient Greek World. Formerly CLASS 252. CLASS 255 Introduction to Roman Art and Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Survey of the art, artifacts, and monuments of the Ancient Roman World. Formerly CLASS 252. L CLASS 261 Women in the Ancient World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the role of women in the Ancient World as approached through the study of literature, law, religion, and art. CLASS 280 Introduction to Ancient Greek History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Not open to students with credit in any two of CLASS 371, 372, and 373.

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L CLASS 302 Classical Myth and Religion Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The background and origin of classical mythology and religion; Mycenean and Near Eastern sources; religious festivals and usages and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: CLASS 102 or consent of Department. CLASS 303 Religion in Greco-Roman Antiquity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the nature of pre-Christian religious practices in antiquity. O CLASS 321 Literature and Culture of the Greek World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of Greek literature and their cultural context. All readings in English. Prerequisite: CLASS 102, 221 or consent of Department. O CLASS 322 Literature and Culture of the Roman World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Representative works of Latin and Greek literature and their cultural context. All readings in English. Prerequisite: CLASS 102, 221 or consent of Department. L CLASS 354 Topics in Greek Civilization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of one aspect of the Classical Greek World. (Emphasis in any one year may be archaeological, historical or literary). Prerequisites: CLASS 254 or 280. L CLASS 355 Topics in Roman Civilization Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of one aspect of the Classical Roman World. (Emphasis in any one year may be archaeological, historical or literary). Prerequisites: CLASS 255, 282 or 283. L CLASS 356 Topics in Ancient Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of one aspect of art in the GrecoRoman world. Prerequisites: CLASS 254 or 255. CLASS 360 Ancient Historiography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examination of the development of history writing in Classical Antiquity. Prerequisite: CLASS 280, 282 or 283. L CLASS 375 History of Medicine in the Ancient World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of medical science from Prehistoric times through Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, and Roman times to the end of the Roman Empire. L CLASS 376 Early Civilization I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of the beginnings and development of civilization in the Near East, including Sumer, Babylon, Assyria, and the Hebrews. Note: not open to students with credit in RELIG 305. L CLASS 380 History of Palestine Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). From the Persian Conquest to the time of Jesus. Note: not open to students with credit in RELIG 308. L CLASS 399 Topics in the Ancient World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CLASS 400 Topics in the Culture and Society of Greco-Roman Antiquity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Any course at or above the 200-level in CLASS, GREEK or LATIN, or consent of Department. CLASS 430 Topics in the Literature of Greco-Roman Antiquity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Any one of CLASS 221, 261, 321, 322, 360 or consent of Department. L CLASS 463 Topics in Roman History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: CLASS 282 or 283 or consent of Department. L CLASS 464 Introduction to Roman Civil Law Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Traces the development of the Roman system of civil law while examining the reasoning of Roman jurists. L CLASS 473 Topics in Classical Archaeology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Any one of CLASS 354, 355, 356, 358 or consent of Department. L CLASS 475 Techniques of Classical Field Archaeology Œ3-6 (variable) (variable, 0-10L-0). The techniques of survey, excavation and

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CIV E 749 Advanced Topics in Water Resources Engineering Œ3.5 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-1). Related Lab experiments.

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recording in Classical Archaeology. Prerequisites: Students must be either Classics majors or in a Classics graduate program. Note: Offered only for fieldwork in the archaeology of the Greek and Roman world and restricted to those participating in a fieldwork program sponsored by the Department. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. L CLASS 476 Advanced Field Techniques in Classical Archaeology Œ3-6 (variable) (variable, 0-10L-0). Advanced field application of Classical Archaeological Theory. Prerequisites: CLASS 475 or equivalent. Note: Offered only for fieldwork in the archaeology of the Greek and Roman world and restricted to those participating in a fieldwork program sponsored by the Department. Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. L CLASS 478 Topics in Roman Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). In-depth study of aspects of Roman art. Prerequisite: CLASS 355 or 356 or consent of Department L CLASS 480 Topics in the Archaeology of the Roman Provinces Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: CLASS 282, 283 or 355 or consent of Department. CLASS 481 Topics in Greek History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: CLASS 280 or consent of Department. CLASS 498 Individual Study of Literary Problems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Any one of CLASS 221, 261, 321, 322, or consent of Department. L CLASS 499 Individual Study of Historical and Archaeological Problems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. CLASS 500 Fourth-Year Honors Tutorial Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department.

Graduate Courses CLASS 501 Research Methods and Resources in Classics Œ1 (fi 2) (first term, 0-1s-0). CLASS 502 Directed Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). This is a credit/fail course. Not open to students in the non-thesis program. CLASS 505 Topics in the Culture and Society of Greco-Roman Antiquity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Consent of Department. CLASS 515 Topics in the Archaeology of Greece Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. CLASS 516 Topics in the Archaeology of the Roman Provinces Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. CLASS 522 Studies in Ancient History Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. CLASS 530 Topics in the Literature of Greco-Roman Antiquity Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Consent of Department. CLASS 578 Roman Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). CLASS 599 Individual Study Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Department. Repeatable. CLASS 601 Studies in Classical Archaeology I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. CLASS 602 Studies in Classical Archaeology II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Requires payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. CLASS 900 Directed Research Project Œ3-9 (variable) (either term, unassigned).

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Communications and Technology, COMM Faculty of Extension

Graduate Courses The most current Course Listing is available on Bear Tracks. 

www.ualberta.ca

For more information email [email protected], (780) 492-1538.

visit www.mact.ca or phone

COMM 501 Applied Research in Communications and Technology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Introduction to quantitative and qualitative approaches for conducting research into technology-mediated communications. Guides students in their topic selection and development for their culminating project. Restricted to MACT students, normally in the second year. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 501 and COMM 501. Prerequisite: COMM 502 and COMM 503 or consent of the Department. COMM 502 Human Communication Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, 3-0-0). Survey of classic theories and emerging perspectives in communication studies. Emphasizes the development of skills for analyzing and understanding communication in context. Restricted to MACT students, normally in the first year. Offered during the Spring Institute. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 502 and COMM 502. COMM 503 Social Impact of Digital Communications Œ3 (fi 6) (Spring/Summer, 3-0-0). This course explores the social impact of digital communications, with a specific focus on new and emerging social media and networks. Course themes cover a broad range of topics on the history and development of digital communications including social networks, virtual communities, and participatory culture. This course also touches on legal, ethical, and practical dimensions of digital communications as they relate to a range of personal and professional contexts. Restricted to MACT students, normally in the first year. Offered during the Spring Institute. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 503 and COMM 503. COMM 504 Organizational Communications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). This course deals with both internal communications (formal and informal) within an organization, and external communications (public relations, media relations, print and multimedia communications). Brief survey of the field of organizational analysis, with focus on marketing, clear language writing, rhetoric, public speaking, and writing for new media (e.g. hypertext). Restricted to MACT students. Course delivered by asynchronous Internet communication. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 504 and COMM 504. Prerequisites: COMM 502 and COMM 503 or consent of the Department. COMM 505 Using and Managing Communications Technologies Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Covers historical issues associated with the rise of selected communications technologies and considers the management issues of competitive strategy, organizational structure, and software/hardware selection as these may be applied to communications technologies in the organization. Restricted to MACT students, normally in the first year. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 505 and COMM 505. COMM 506 Using and Managing Communications Networks Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines the concept of a network as both an organizational form and an organizational resource. Explores the decision-making options that are created by the establishment of organizational networks. Restricted to MACT students, normally in the second year. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 506 and COMM 506. Prerequisites: COMM 502 and COMM 503 or consent of the Department. COMM 507 Knowledge Management and Communications Technologies Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 3-0-0). Explores managing knowledge from an organizational perspective. Covers knowledge-management technologies and tools, as well as emerging issues and trends. Restricted to MACT students, normally in the second year. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 507 and COMM 507. Prerequisites: COMM 505 or consent of the Department. COMM 508 Culminating Project Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, unassigned). Under supervision, students undertake a project that addresses some practical problem, issue, or objective related to communications and technology. Restricted to MACT students. Course delivered by asynchronous Internet communication. Not available to students admitted to the program after May 2010. COMM 511 Topics in Research Methods Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, unassigned). Introduction to approaches for conducting research into technology-mediated communications, with an emphasis on qualitative methods. Students may not receive credit for both COMM 501 and COMM 511. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication, in the classroom, or as a tutorial. L COMM 550 Introduction to Electronic Commerce Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). An introduction to the concepts, technologies, and functions of electronic commerce. Considers the organizational implications of electronic commerce as a broad shift in how transactions are completed in the marketplace. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 555 and COMM 550.

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L COMM 552 Intellectual Property: The Copyright Component Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). An introduction to intellectual property with emphasis on Canadian copyright law as it applies to the development of multimedia projects. Examines the protection provided by trademarks, patents, and copyright for such media as digital photographs, logos, and inventions. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 552 and EXT 597 titled Intellectual Property: The Copyright Component and COMM 552. L COMM 553 Facilitating Communication and Understanding Through Utilization-Based Evaluation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). Senior seminar course examining the use of evaluation within various organizational contexts, with an emphasis on survey and focus-group methods. Student activities include development of an evaluation plan. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 553 and EXT 597 titled Facilitating Communications and Understanding through Utilization-Focused Evaluation and COMM 553. COMM 590 Conference Course in Communications and Technology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). Offered by asynchronous Internet communication, in the classroom, or as a tutorial. L COMM 597 Topics in Communications and Technology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). An elective course on selected topics in communications and technology. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. COMM 598 Directed Study in Communications and Technology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). An elective course to be completed under the direction of a faculty member. Requires the approval of the Director. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. COMM 900 Directed Research Project Œ6 (fi 12) (two term, unassigned). Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. Restricted to MACT students. Students may not receive credit for both COMM 508 and COMM 900.

231.84

Community Service-Learning, CSL Office of Interdisciplinary Studies Faculty of Arts

Undergraduate Courses CSL 100 An Introduction to Community Engagement Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An interdisciplinary introduction to community and civic engagement for students interested in preparing the groundwork for undertaking further experiential educational opportunities (e.g., Internships, Study Abroad, CSL). CSL 300 Theory and Practice in Community Service-Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An in-depth exploration of theories and practices of civic engagement and community change for students who have already completed a course with a CSL component and who wish to extend their volunteer experience. Prerequisite: Completion of a course with a CSL component or consent of instructor. Note: For information about courses in programs and departments across the Faculty of Arts that offer a CSL component, see the link on the CSL website, www.csl.ualberta.ca CSL 350 Selected Topics in Community Service-Learning Œ1-6 (variable) (variable, unassigned). Content varies from year to year. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. This course may require payment of additional student instructional support fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. CSL 360 Community Service-Learning Practicum Œ1-6 (variable) (variable, unassigned). Course content varies from year to year but will include a significant service component. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Corequisite: CSL 350 or other approved course. This course may require payment of an additional miscellaneous fee. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar. CSL 480 Individual Study in Community Service-Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned). Individual study opportunity on topics for which

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no specific course is currently offered. Prerequisites: Consent of Community Service - Learning Director, consent of instructor, and completion of a 3 credit course with a CSL component.

Graduate Courses CSL 550 Selected Topics in Community Service-Learning Œ1-6 (variable) (variable, unassigned). Content varies from year to year. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. This course may require payment of an additional miscellaneous fee. CSL 560 Community Service-Learning Practicum Œ1-6 (variable) (variable, unassigned). Course content varies from year to year but will include a significant community-based project component. Topics and credit value announced prior to registration period. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Corequisite: CSL 550 or other approved course. This course may require payment of an additional miscellaneous fee.

231.85

Comparative Literature, C LIT Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies Faculty of Arts

Notes (1) Courses in Comparative Literature teach a number of literature’s from and international perspective with the help of translations as necessary. (2) See the following sections for listings of other Office of Interdisciplinary programs. Humanities Computing (HUCO): Interdisciplinary (INT  D) Faculty of Arts Courses; Middle Eastern and African Studies (MEAS); Religious Studies (RELIG); Science, Technology and Society (STS) and Writing Studies (WRS).

Undergraduate Courses C LIT 101 World Literature I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to major works of the world’s literary heritage, presented in their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Covers the period from the beginnings of literary civilizations until the 17th century. Not open to students with C LIT 100. C LIT 102 World Literature II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to major works of the world’s literary heritage, presented in their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Covers the period from the 17th century through the present day. Not open to students with credit in C LIT 100. O C LIT 206 History of Literary Theory I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of theories of literature, from Plato through 20th century New Criticism. O C LIT 207 History of Literary Theory II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Major recent and contemporary theoretical schools, including structuralism, poststructuralism, reader response, hermeneutics, feminism, queer theory, Marxism, and postcolonialism. C LIT 210 Cyberliterature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to the relations between literature and online textuality. C LIT 220 Mythology and Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines how world mythologies have been given literary expression, both in ancient texts and modern reworkings. O C LIT 228 Literature, Popular Culture, and the Visual Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Poetics of such popular genres as crime fiction, spy fiction, the horror story, etc., and their relation to mainstream literature and culture. O C LIT 230 Scandalous Fictions Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The importance of scandal both to the reception of particular literary works, and to literary history in general. O C LIT 242 Science Fiction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An introduction to science fiction as an international genre and a survey of works and trends O C LIT 243 Fairy Tales and Folk Tales Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of European fairy tales and an introduction to critical and theoretical approaches to the folk tale in general and the fairy tale in particular. C LIT 260 Marginalized Literatures Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Examines how and why literary works have been excluded from official literary canons.

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L COMM 551 Understanding Computing Projects: Application, Design, Project Management Issues for Communication Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, unassigned). An introduction to the fundamental concepts of computing projects and project design assumptions. Intended to assist communications professionals in making decisions in managing computing software, database and Internet-related projects. Offered by asynchronous Internet communication. Students may not receive credit for both EXT 551 and COMM 551.

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O C LIT 266 Women and World Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An examination of major works of world literature by women from antiquity to the present. C LIT 290 Literature Reimagined Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Variable content. This course aims to introduce students to new ways of thinking about literature, and about its relations with other disciplines or society at large. O C LIT 297 Special Topics in Comparative Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). C LIT 301 Pre-Modern Literature of the European Tradition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of European literary tradition from the Biblical and Graeco-Roman heritage to the Renaissance. Not open to students with credit in C LIT 201. C LIT 302 Modern Literature of the European Tradition Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of the Western literary tradition from the Renaissance to the present day. Not open to students with credit in C LIT 202. C LIT 347 Elements of Genre Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Variable content. A detailed survey of the main features of one given genre, either narrative fiction, poetry, or drama. Not open to students who have completed C LIT 344, 345 or 346. O C LIT 352 Literature and the Other Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Throughout history, literature had close relations with the other arts (such as painting and sculpture, music and theatre): more recently these relations extended to cinema television, and other media. Each year, the course will emphasize one of these relations, in an interdisciplinary perspective which stresses contacts and commonalities, but also the specific differences of art forms and the media. O C LIT 358 Great Themes of Literature and Art Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The international and interdisciplinary study of selected international mythical and legendary themes and motifs, such as Faust and Don Juan, their origin, and their literary and artistic developments. O C LIT 363 Inter-American Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Relations among the literature, culture, history, and politics of the Americas. O C LIT 372 Comparative Studies in Canadian Prose Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Study of narrative and other forms of Canadian prose, chiefly French and English, examined on a comparative basis within an international framework. O C LIT 440 Comparative Studies in Popular Culture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An international historical and typological analysis of selected topics in popular literature and media, their changing status in society and culture, as well as their interaction with canonized forms of literature and the arts. L C LIT 448 Studies in Critical Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An advanced study of a particular critical theory. Topics may include Feminism, Marxism, Post-Colonialism. L C LIT 460 Fundamentals of Comparative Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Disciplinary issues, approaches and methodologies in Comparative Literature as they differ from those of national literatures. L C LIT 464 Studies in Literary Genres Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An advanced study of ‘genre’ (e.g. the novel) in an international and a particular historical context. O C LIT 465 Literature and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). International comparative studies of the interrelationship of literature and society. L C LIT 474 Studies in the Relationship of Literature and the Visual Arts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A cross-cultural study of the interrelations between art and literature. L C LIT 480 Directed Reading in Comparative Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: consent of the Program Coordinator. L C LIT 497 Special Topics in Comparative Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). L C LIT 499 Honors Tutorial and Essay Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Preparation of the Honors Essay.

Graduate Courses L C LIT 501 Studies in World Literature I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An advanced level survey of major works of world literature from antiquity to the 17th century. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of one language other than English.

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L C LIT 502 Studies in World Literature II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). An advanced-level survey of major works of world literatures and literary movements from 18th century to 21st century. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of one language other than English. L C LIT 511 History of Literary Theory I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A historical survey of literary theory from Plato to the New Criticism. Reading knowledge of one language other than English. L C LIT 512 History of Literary Theory II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). A survey of contemporary critical theory with emphasis on major theoretical schools after the New Criticism (20th-21st Centuries). Reading knowledge of one language other than English. L C LIT 521 Directed Reading Course I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Program Coordinator. L C LIT 522 Directed Reading Course II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Program Coordinator. L C LIT 560 Theories of Comparative Literature Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of one language other than English. L C LIT 585 Studies in Forms and Genres Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of one language other than English. L C LIT 610 Special Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of one language other than English. L C LIT 696 Seminar Course Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of two languages other than English. L C LIT 697 Special Reading Course I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Program Coordinator. L C LIT 698 Special Reading Course II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3s-0). Prerequisite: consent of Program Coordinator. C LIT 900 Directed Research Project Œ3 (fi 6) (variable, unassigned).

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Computer Engineering, CMPE Division of Computer Engineering, Departments of Computing Science; Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculties of Engineering and Science

The following courses were renumbered effective 2012-2013: Old New Old New CMPE 300 ECE 320 CMPE 440 ECE 493 CMPE 310 ECE 321 CMPE 449 ECE 449 CMPE 320 ECE 322 CMPE 480 ECE 410 CMPE 382 ECE 311 CMPE 487 ECE 487 CMPE 401 ECE 315 CMPE 488 ECE 413 CMPE 410 ECE 421 CMPE 490 ECE 492 CMPE 420 ECE 422 CMPE 498 ECE 406 CMPE 425 ECE 412 CMPE 499 ECE 407

Undergraduate Courses CMPE 402 C/C++ Programming for Engineers Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Introduction to the C/C++ programming language and object-oriented software design. Models of software development. Fundamental principles of software engineering. Procedure-oriented versus object-oriented software design. Built-in and user-defined data types. Abstract data types and objects. Basic control structures and input/output in C/C++. Functions, parameter passing mechanisms, and function overloading. Arrays and pointers. Classes and data abstraction. Operator overloading. Class hierarchies, inheritance, virtual functions, and polymorphism. Function and class templates. Exception handling. Generic programming and the C++ Standard Template Library. Prerequisite: ENCMP 100 or equivalent. Note: Cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in CMPUT 201. CMPE 450 Nanoscale System Design Project Œ4 (fi 8) (either term, 1-0-6). Design and verification of high-performance digital systems that integrate nanoscale devices onto a single solid-state substrate or assembly. System-level specification, design and verification; design re-use strategies and alternatives; and the application of practical defect and errortolerance techniques. Students work in teams. Restricted to students in the Nanoscale System Design Option. CMPE 485 Embedded Systems Œ3.8 (fi 8) (either term, 3-0-3/2). Applications of embedded systems and challenges

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University of Alberta

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231.87

Computing Science, CMPUT Department of Computing Science Faculty of Science

Notes (1) There are many routes to the study of Computing Science. Students should seek advice from a department advisor or visit our website at www.cs.ualberta. ca/courses. (2) The department of Computing Science does not allow audits in any of its laboratory courses. (3) Special sections of CMPUT 196, 197, 198, 199, 296, 297, 298, 299, 396, 397, 398, 399, 496, 497, 498, 499 may have different prerequisites. Please check the specific course descriptions as posted by the Department of Computing Science.

Undergraduate Courses O CMPUT 101 Introduction to Computing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An introduction to fundamental concepts in computing science, including state, abstraction, composition, and representation. Introduction to algorithms, logic, circuits, machine architecture and other topics in elementary computing science. This course cannot be taken for credit if credit has been obtained in CMPUT 114, 174 or SCI 100. See Note (1) above. O CMPUT 174 Introduction to the Foundations of Computation I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). CMPUT 174 and 175 use a problem-driven approach to introduce the fundamental ideas of Computing Science. Emphasis is on the underlying process behind the solution, independent of programming language or style. Basic notions of state, control flow, data structures, recursion, modularization, and testing are introduced through solving simple problems in a variety of domains such as text analysis, map navigation, game search, simulation, and cryptography. Students learn to program by reading and modifying existing programs as well as writing new ones. No prior programming experience is necessary. Prerequisite: Math 30 or 30-1. See Note (1) above. O CMPUT 175 Introduction to the Foundations of Computation II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). A continuation of CMPUT 174, revisiting topics of greater depth and complexity. More sophisticated notions such as objects, functional programming, time and memory consumption, and user interface building are explored. Upon completion of this two course sequence, students from any discipline should be able to build programs to solve basic problems in their area, and will be prepared to take more advanced Computing Science courses. Prerequisite: CMPUT 174 or SCI 100. CMPUT 201 Practical Programming Methodology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to the principles, methods, tools, and practices of the professional programmer. The lectures focus on the fundamental principles of software engineering based on abstract data types and their implementations. The laboratories offer an intensive apprenticeship to the aspiring software developer. Students use C and C++ and software development tools of the UNIX environment. Prerequisite: CMPUT 115 or 175. CMPUT 204 Algorithms I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0). The first of two courses on algorithm design and analysis, with emphasis on fundamentals of searching, sorting, and graph algorithms. Examples include divide and conquer, dynamic programming, greedy methods, backtracking, and local search methods, together with analysis techniques to estimate program efficiency. Prerequisites: CMPUT 115 or 175, CMPUT 272; MATH 113, 114, or 117 or SCI 100. CMPUT 206 Introduction to Digital Image Processing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An introduction to basic digital image processing theory, and the tools that make advanced image manipulation possible for ordinary users. Image processing is important in many applications: editing and processing photographs, special effects for movies, drawing animated characters starting with photographs, analyzing and enhancing images captured by the mars rover or the Hubble telescope, an detecting suspects from surveillance cameras. Image processing concepts are introduced using tools like Photoshop and GIMP. Exposure to simple image processing programming with JAVA and Mathlab. This course is preparation for more advanced courses in the Digital Media area. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Computing Science course, plus knowledge of first-year level Math, Stat; and introductory JAVA, C, or similar programming experience; or consent of Instructor or SCI 100. Open to students in the Faculty of Arts, Engineering and Sciences, others require permission of the instructor.

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CMPUT 210 Codes, Codemakers, Codebreakers: An Introduction to Cryptography Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An historical introduction to cryptography intended for a general audience. The development of codes and code-breaking from military espionage in ancient Greece to deciphering hieroglyphics via the Rosetta stone to modern computer ciphers. Includes frequency analysis, one-time-pad security, and public key cryptography. Prerequisites: Any 100 level course. CMPUT 229 Computer Organization and Architecture I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). General introduction to number representation, architecture and organization concepts of von Neumann machines, assembly level programming, exception handling, peripheral programming, floating-point computations and memory management. Prerequisite: CMPUT 115 or 175. Corequisite: CMPUT 201 or 274. Credit may be obtained in only one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212. CMPUT 250 Computers and Games Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). An interdisciplinary course for students in Science, Arts, and other faculties. The focus is on games as interactive entertainment, their role in society, and how they are made. Teams composed of students with diverse backgrounds (e.g. English, Art and Design, and Computing Science) follow the entire creative process: from concept, through pitch, to delivery, of a short narrative-based game using a commercial game engine. To achieve the required mix of backgrounds and experience, students must apply for admission to this course. Prerequisites: Second-year standing. See the Computing Science web site for more details at www.cs.ualberta.ca/courses O CMPUT 272 Formal Systems and Logic in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-3s-0). An introduction to the tools of set theory, logic, and induction, and their use in the practice of reasoning about algorithms and programs. Basic set theory. The notion of a function. Counting. Propositional and predicate logic and their proof systems. Inductive definitions and proofs by induction. Program specification and correctness. Prerequisite: Any 100-level CMPUT course or SCI 100. CMPUT 274 Introduction to Tangible Computing I Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). This is part 1 of a 2 sequence intensive problembased introduction to Computing Science. In part 1, the key concepts of procedural programming, basic algorithm design and analysis (lists, queues, trees, sorting, searching), and reactive interfacing with the world are learned by solving a series of problems using the Arduino platform and C/C++. The use of a resource-limited processor with no operating system opens up the inner workings of computing. Development is done using the Linux operating system with the exposed compiler tool chain. Prerequisites: No specific programming experience or discrete-math background is assumed. Math 30 or 31. Note: this course is taught in studio-style, where lectures and labs are blended into 3 hour sessions, twice a week. Enrollment is limited by the capacity of the combined lecture/lab facilities. CMPUT 275 Introduction to Tangible Computing II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-6L-0). This is part 2 of a 2 sequence intensive introduction to Computing Science. Part 2 expands to add object-oriented programming, a higher level language (Python), and more complex algorithms and data structures such as shortest paths in graphs; caching, memoization, and dynamic programming; client-server style computing; recursion; and limited distributed of computation tasks between the Arduino platform and the traditional desktop in order to explore design tradeoffs. Prerequisite: CMPUT 274. Note: this course is taught in studiostyle, where lectures and labs are blended into 3 hour sessions, twice a week. Enrollment is limited by the capacity of the combined lecture/lab facilities. CMPUT 291 Introduction to File and Database Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Basic concepts in computer data organization and information processing; entity-relationship model; relational model; SQL and other relational query languages; storage architecture; physical organization of data; access methods for relational data. Programming experience (e.g. Java or Python) is required for the course project. Prerequisite: one of CMPUT 115, 175 or 275. CMPUT 296 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 297 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 299 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 300 Computers and Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-0). Social, ethical, professional, economic, and legal issues in the development and deployment of computer technology in society. Prerequisites: CMPUT course or SCI 100 , and any 200-level course. CMPUT 301 Introduction to Software Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Object-oriented design and analysis, with interactive applications as the primary example. Topics include: software process; revision control; Unified Modeling Language (UML); requirements; software architecture, design patterns, frameworks, design guidelines; unit testing; refactoring; software tools. Prerequisite: CMPUT 201 or 275.

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of embedded systems design; embedded processors, embedded reconfigurable hardware, embedded software; specification, modeling, design and verification of embedded systems; real time systems; construction of event-driven systems; performance issues; practical examples. Corequisites: CMPE 401, CMPUT 379.

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CMPUT 302 Introduction to Human Computer Interaction Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). A complementary course to introductory software engineering focused on a user-centered approach to software design. The main themes are how humans interact with physical and information environments, and how to design software with human’s information needs and their cognitive capacities in mind. Topics include the user-centered design cycle, and evaluation methods for discovering usability problems in interface design. Prerequisite: CMPUT 301. CMPUT 304 Algorithms II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The second course of a two-course sequence on algorithm design. Emphasis on principles of algorithm design. Categories of algorithms such as divide-and-conquer, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming; analysis of algorithms; limits of algorithm design; NP-completeness; heuristic algorithms. Prerequisites: CMPUT 204 or 275; one of STAT 141, 151, 235 or 265; one of MATH 225, 227, 228 or consent of Instructor. CMPUT 306 Image Processing: Algorithms and Applications Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction, history, and applications; scanning and quantization; visual perception; output devices; pattern recognition; feature extraction, decision theory, classification rules; data representation and formats; image enhancement and restoration; edge detection, segmentation and texture; correlation and registration. Prerequisites: CMPUT 201 or 275; one of CMPUT 340, CMPUT 418 or equivalent knowledge; MATH 214 and STAT 252 or 266. Credit may be obtained in only one of CMPUT 306 or EE BE 540. CMPUT 307 3D Graphics and Animation with 3DS Max Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Interdisciplinary introduction to Graphics and Animation through the use of the 3D Studio Max package. Graphics and Animation have industrial applications in advertising, movies, games and TV. Interdisciplinary teams will work together on practical applications of graphics and animations. For example, students can work on a project to enhance sculpting skills using a database of 3D models. Prerequisite: Any second or higher-level undergraduate student, with some math, computer programming and image processing background, or permission of the instructor. CMPUT 313 Computer Networks Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to computer communication networks. Protocols for error and flow control. Wired and wireless medium access protocols. Routing and congestion control. Internet architecture and protocols. Multimedia transmission. Recent advances in networking. Prerequisites: CMPUT 201 and 204 or 275; one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212 and STAT 252 or 266. CMPUT 325 Non-Procedural Programming Languages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). A study of the theory, run-time structure, and implementation of selected non-procedural programming languages. Languages will be selected from the domains of functional, and logic-based languages. Prerequisites: CMPUT 201 and 204 or 275; one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212, and MATH 125. CMPUT 329 Computer Organization and Architecture II Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). CMOS technology, digital circuits, combinational logic, sequential logic, memory technologies, programmable logic devices, control logic design, register transfer logic, CPU design, hardware description languages. Prerequisite: one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212. Credit may be obtained in only one of CMPUT 329, E  E 280 or ECE 210. CMPUT 333 Security in a Networked World Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Authentication protocols, passwords, shared and public key cryptography, network protocol and network services security, firewalls, malicious code, vulnerability identification, intrusion detection, wireless security. Prerequisite: CMPUT 201 or 275. CMPUT 340 Introduction to Numerical Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). Computer arithmetic and errors. The study of computational methods for solving problems in linear algebra, non-linear equations, optimization, interpolation and approximation, and integration. This course will provide a basic foundation in numerical methods that supports further study in machine learning; computer graphics, vision and multimedia; robotics; and other topics in Science and Engineering. Prerequisites: CMPUT 204 or 275; MATH 125, 214; one of STAT 141, 151, 235 or 265. CMPUT 350 Advanced Games Programming Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). This course focuses on state-of-the-art AI and graphics programming for video games. Part 1 introduces C++, the language of choice for video game engines, emphasizing efficiency, safety, the Standard Template Library, and OpenGL. Part 2 on real time strategy deals with efficient pathfinding algorithms, planning, and scripting AI systems. Student projects give hands-on experience directly applicable to the video games industry. Prerequisite: CMPUT 201 or 275. May not be offered every year. CMPUT 366 Intelligent Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to artificial intelligence focusing on techniques for building intelligent software systems and agents. Topics include search and problem-solving techniques, knowledge representation and reasoning, reasoning and acting under uncertainty, machine learning and neural networks. Recent applications such as planning and scheduling, diagnosis, decision support

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systems, and data mining. Prerequisites: CMPUT 204 or 275; one of STAT 141, 151, 235 or 265. CMPUT 379 Operating System Concepts Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Processes: process state transitions; operations on processes; interrupt processing; parallel processing; multiprocessor considerations; resource allocation; critical sections and events; semaphores; deadlock: avoidance, detection, and recovery; memory management; virtual memory; paging and segmentation; page replacement strategies; working sets; demand paging; scheduling: levels, objectives, and criteria; scheduling algorithms; file system functions; file organization; space allocation; elements of operating systems security. Prerequisites: CMPUT 201 and 204 or 275; one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212. CMPUT 391 Database Management Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Database design and normalization theory, transaction management, query processing and optimization; support for special data types such as multimedia, spatial data, and XML documents, support for complex applications and data analysis such as data mining, data warehousing, and information retrieval. Prerequisites: CMPUT 204 or 275, and CMPUT 291. CMPUT 396 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 398 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 399 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 400 Industrial Internship Practicum Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 0-3s-0). Required by all students who have just completed a Computing Science Industrial Internship Program. Must be completed during the first academic term following return to full-time studies. Note: A Grade of F to A+ will be determined by the student’s job performance as evaluated by the employer, by the student’s performance in the completion of an internship practicum report, and by the student’s ability to learn from the experiences of the internship as demonstrated in an oral presentation. Prerequisite: WKEXP 956, 957 or 958. CMPUT 401 Software Process and Product Management Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). All phases of software development are reviewed from a process perspective. Best practices in software project and product development and management are introduced. Architectural and technological impacts on management. Group projects require specification and initial design or redesign of a software system. Prerequisites: CMPUT 301. CMPUT 402 Software Quality Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Software quality issues, metrics, verification, validation, and testing. Students working in project groups are required to complete the implementation of a system or significant subsystem and undertake unit, integration and acceptance testing. Industry standard assessment methods such as CMM or SPICE are introduced. Prerequisite: CMPUT 401. CMPUT 403 Practical Algorithmics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). The essence of computing science is in solving problems by computation. It may take anywhere from several minutes to several years from the initial posing of a problem specification to finally getting a working program. This course is interested in problems that can be solved within at most several hours by well prepared people. Prerequisites: Restricted to students participating in the programming contest. Any 300 level course, and consent of the instructor. CMPUT 410 Web-Based Information Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Overview of Web technologies and applications. This course is project based and addresses issues such as web-based applications and databases design and implementation, XML data exchange and modeling, application component integration over the Web, security mechanisms, and Web Mining for intelligent web-based applications. Prerequisite: CMPUT 301 and 391 or consent of Instructor. CMPUT 411 Introduction to Computer Graphics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). 2-D and 3-D transformation; 3-D modeling and viewing; illumination models and shading methods; texture mapping; ray tracing. Prerequisites: CMPUT 204 or 275, 301; one of CMPUT 340, 418 or equivalent knowledge, and MATH 214. Credit may be obtained in only one of CMPUT 311 and 411. CMPUT 412 Experimental Mobile Robotics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). A project-based course dealing with the design and implementation of mobile robots to accomplish specific tasks. Students work in groups and are introduced to concepts in sensor technologies, sensor data processing, motion control based on feedback and real-time programming. Prerequisites: CMPUT 201 and 204, or 275; one of CMPUT 340, 418 or equivalent knowledge; MATH 214 and STAT 252 or 266. CMPUT 414 Introduction to Multimedia Technology Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Intro to basic principles and algorithms used in

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CMPUT 415 Compiler Design Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Compilers, interpreters, lexical analysis, syntax analysis, syntax directed translation, code generation, code optimization. Prerequisites: one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212, and a 300-level Computing Science course or consent of Instructor. CMPUT 418 Numerical Methods 1: Numerical Linear Algebra and NonLinear Equations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). Basic numerical concepts: representations, accuracy and stability. Linear equations: Existence and uniqueness, problem transformations. Factorizations: LU, QR, SVD and Eigen values, vectors. Various applications including data-fitting using polynomials and other bases. Non-linear equations and optimization: Existence, uniqueness, sensitivity, conditioning, convergence rates; methods: 1-D and n-D search methods including Bisection, Newton, Gauss-Newton, Broyden, Levenberg-Marquart. Trust region methods and homotopy embeddings. Short introduction to numerical differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite: one of MATH 101, 115 or 118 and one of MATH 102, 125 or 127. CMPUT 419 Numerical Methods 2: Computational Differential Equations Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-1s-3). Survey of classical methods for numerical quadrature, differentiation and integration of differential equations. Existence, uniqueness and conditioning of solutions. Discrete function systems: Global polynomials, trigonometric bases, bases with local support/splines. L_2 projection and error analysis of discrete function approximations. Galerkin’s method. Archetype differential equations, their solution using Galerkin Finite Element methods, and error analysis: Two point boundary value problems (BVP), scalar initial value problems (IVP), systems of IVP, variational methods. Partial Differential Equations (PDE): Poisson, heat, wave, stationary convection-diffusion, elliptic eigenvalue problems. Abstraction: Lax-Milgram theorem, abstract FEM, stability. Prerequisites: one of MATH 102, 125 or 127 and one of MATH 209, 214 or 217. Recommended Corequisites: one of MATH 201 or 334. CMPUT 428 Computer Vision Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Introduction to the geometry and photometry of the 3D to 2D image formation process for the purpose of computing scene properties from camera images. Computing and analyzing motion in image sequences. Recognition of objects (what) and spatial relationships (where) from images and tracking of these in video sequences. Prerequisites: CMPUT 201 or 275; one of CMPUT 340, 418 or equivalent knowledge; one of MATH 101, 115 or 118, and one of MATH 102, 125 or 127. CMPUT 429 Computer Systems and Architecture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). A discussion of computer system design concepts with stress on modern ideas that have shaped the high-performance architecture of contemporary systems. Instruction sets, pipelining, instruction-level parallelism, register reuse, branch prediction, CPU control, and related concepts. Memory technologies, caches, I/O, high-performance backplanes and buses. Prerequisite: CMPUT 201 or 275; one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212. Credit may be obtained in only one of CMPUT 429 or CMPE 382. CMPUT 466 Machine Learning Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). Learning is essential for many real-world tasks, including adaptive control, recognition, diagnosis, forecasting and data-mining. This course covers a variety of learning scenarios (supervised, unsupervised and partially supervised), as well as foundational methods for regression, classification, dimensionality reduction and clustering. Modeling techniques such as kernels, Gaussian processes and probabilistic graphical models will typically be introduced. It will also provide the formal foundations for understanding when learning is possible and practical. Prerequisite: one of CMPUT 340, 418 or equivalent knowledge; one of STAT 141, 151, 235 or 265; or consent of Instructor. CMPUT 470 Computational Neuroscience Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3L-0). This is an interdisciplinary course covering areas in Computing Science, Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering. It covers three main areas. How do biological systems represent and process information at the level of single neurons? How is this information processed at the level of small neural networks? How this information is used to control body movements. Given the interdisciplinary nature of this course, we will ensure that students first learn the fundamental concepts of other the disciplines before they are applied. Prerequisites: one of PHYSL 372, PMCOL 371, PEDS 302, CMPUT 340, or consent of instructor. CMPUT 474 Formal Languages, Automata, and Computability Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). Formal grammars; relationship between grammars and automata; regular expressions; finite state machines; pushdown automata; Turing machines; computability; the halting problem; time and space complexity.

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Prerequisite: CMPUT 204 or 275, one of CMPUT 229, E  E 380 or ECE 212 and one of MATH 225, 227, or 228 or consent of the instructor. CMPUT 481 Parallel and Distributed Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to parallel programming, parallel and distributed systems, and high-performance computing in science and engineering. Both shared-memory parallel computers and distributed-memory multicomputers (e.g., clusters) will be studied. Aspects of the practice of, and (some) research issues in, parallelism will be covered. There will be an emphasis on thread programming, data-parallel programming, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: CMPUT 201, CMPUT 379, or permission of the instructor. May not be offered every year. CMPUT 495 Honors Seminar Œ0 (fi 1) (either term, 0-1s-0). This weekly seminar brings students, researchers, and practitioners together to examine a variety of topics, both foundational and leading edge. Content varies over successive offerings of the course. Required of all Honors Computing Science students during each Fall/Winter semester of their degree program. Prerequisite: Restricted to Honors Computing Science students, or consent of the instructor. CMPUT 496 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 497 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 498 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above. CMPUT 499 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). See Note (3) above.

Graduate Courses CMPUT 501 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). CMPUT 502 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). CMPUT 510 Topics in Computational Neuroscience Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3L-0). CMPUT 511 Topics In Computer Graphics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). CMPUT 530 Topics in Computer Architecture Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). CMPUT 551 Topics in Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-3). CMPUT 603 Teaching and Research Methods Œ3 (fi 6) (first term, 2-1s-0). A description of computing science research, with emphasis on research methodology. Includes techniques and conventions that are employed in various sub-areas of computing science, both for doing research and presenting results. Strategies and information for being an effective teaching assistant are also presented. Required for all graduate students. CMPUT 604 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 605 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 606 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 607 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 609 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 610 Topics in Computer Graphics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 611 Advanced Computer Graphics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 613 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 615 Topics in Image Processing and Vision Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 616 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 617 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).

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C Course Listings

multimedia systems. Students obtain hands-on experience in issues relating to multimedia data representation, compression, processing, and retrieval. Topics include sound transmission, music streaming, 2-D and 3-D graphics, image and video transmission, networking, human perceptual issues associated to multimedia technologies. Prerequisite: CMPUT 302 or 306; one of CMPUT 340, 418 or equivalent knowledge; knowledge of second year level MATH/STAT; JAVA, C, or equivalent programming or consent of Instructor.

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618 CMPUT 620 Topics in Programming Languages Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 621 Constraint Programming Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 631 Robotics Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 640 Topics in Computer Networks Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 642 Topics in Computer Networks Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 643 Topics In Computer Networks Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 644 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 650 Topics in Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 651 Topics in Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 652 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 654 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 655 Topics in Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 656 Topics in Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 658 Topics in Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 659 Topics in Artificial Intelligence Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 660 Topics in Software Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 662 Software Specification and Verification Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 663 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 664 Topics in Software Engineering Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 670 Topics in the Theory of Computation Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 672 Algorithmic Graph Theory Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 674 Topics in Combinatorial Computing Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 675 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 680 Topics in Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0).

CMPUT 681 Topics in Parallel and Distributed Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 690 Topics in Databases Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 692 Modern Database Management Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 693 Topics in Database Systems Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 694 Topics in Databases Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 697 Topics in Computing Science Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 3-0-0). CMPUT 701 Essay in Computing Science I Œ6 (fi 12) (either term, 0-1s-5). A major essay on an agreed topic.

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Dance, DANCE Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation

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Note: See also INT  D 439 for a course which is offered by more than one Department or Faculty and which may be taken as an option or as a course in this discipline.

Undergraduate Courses DANCE 200 The Spectrum of Dance in Society Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-2). The theory and practice of dance as a human physical activity. Focus will be on the aesthetic, expressive, rhythmical dimensions of movement in a culture’s artistic and social life. The study will include movement content, techniques, improvisation, composition and performance in a variety of dance forms including modern/creative, social, jazz, and folk dance. DANCE 340 Modern Dance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3L-0). The study of creative dance techniques, improvisation, composition, and performance through theory and practical experience. DANCE 345 Modern Dance Techniques Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3L-0). Development of personal movement skills in a variety of modern dance techniques combined with knowledge of movement and dance principles. Prerequisite: DAC 160 or 165, or DANCE 200 or 340, or equivalent, or consent of Faculty. DANCE 350 International Folk Dance Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 0-3L-0). The study of folk dances in selected cultures through theory and practical experience. Theory will focus on costume, music, history, geography, and other elements which influence the dances. DANCE 431 Study of Dance for Children Œ3 (fi 6) (either term, 1-0-2). Children’s dance from the perspec